All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom, Part I

Description

This course introduces students to what it means to teach in an inclusive elementary classroom. Students will be introduced to designing standards-based lesson plans and measurable learning outcomes. Additionally, they will begin to learn the importance of both formative and summative assessment. Students will learn and practice classroom management techniques to create a safe and effective learning community. Students will also be introduced to effective strategies for differentiation of instruction to make learning accessible to all students.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom, Part 2

Description

This course is a continuation of the Part I course. Students will continue to explore and practice teaching in an inclusive elementary classroom. They will work on refining curriculum development skills including designing a unit and standards-based lesson plans with clearly-aligned assessments and measurable learning outcomes. Students will refine and practice classroom management techniques to create a safe and effective learning community that promotes democratic practices and is an example of a culturally responsive classroom. Students will also be practice and refine effective strategies for differentiation of instruction to make learning accessible to all students.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.1000 Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom, Part I.

Foundations of Reading

Description

This course focuses on the psychological bases of reading process, stages in development of reading ability and the sequence of reading skill acquisition. Topics covered will include the nature of oral language development, the reading process, and the relationship between reading, writing speaking, listening, visualizing and visually representing. Students will study models of literacy instruction, and the theoretical and practical reasons undergirding those models. The use of diagnostic strategies for knowing the learners' literacy performance and strategies for remediation will be examined. The format of the course will be primarily lecture, discussion, small group activities and presentations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Introduction to Moderate Disabilities

Description

This foundational course consists of two major components. The first provides candidates with a comprehensive examination of special education laws and legislation and the characteristics of students with moderate disabilities. The second component provides and overview of instructional models that have empirical support for their effectiveness in teaching students with moderate disabilities. Candidates also gain exposure to IEP writing and lesson planning.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.1000 Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom, Part 1, and EDUC.1500 Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom, Part 2.

Education Assessment of Students with Moderate D

Description

This course is designed to provide candidates with a framework for understanding the process of assessing students with moderate, high-incidence disabilities. Candidates focus on all aspects of the evaluation process from the point of pre-referral to identification and re-evaluation, with an emphasis on administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting on formal and informal educational assessments. Emphasis is on the interpretation of assessment data for the purposes of making eligibility decisions and establishing individualized Education Program annual goals, objectives, instructional strategies, and placement decisions.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.2100 Introduction to Moderate Disabilities.

Teaching Elementary Social Studies in the Inclusive

Description

Teaching Elementary Social Studies prepares teacher candidates to help the younger learner gain knowledge about past and present human experiences as well as to develop the skills necessary to process and apply information. It also prepares the younger learner to develop democratic values and attitudes by providing opportunities for social participation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Understanding Family and Community Engagement

Description

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to key concepts of family and community engagement. Students will utilize readings, discussions, and hands-on activities to examine their understanding of the role that families and communities play in the educational lives of students. They will learn community-based relational approaches and design on family or community engagement strategy to utilize in their classrooms. The course will also explore how social networks and school structures impact the development of meaningful relationship between teachers, families, and community members.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.2000 Foundations of Reading, and EDUC.2100 Introduction to Moderate Disabilities.

Early Literacy Community Experience I (Formerly 02.301)

Description

This is Part One of a two semester course that focuses on experiential learning associated with the Jumpstart Program. The course provides students in the education minor with the necessary skills for working with children in early childhood community agencies. Topics based on the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards which include child development, family and community, assessment, teaching and learning, literacy development, and professionalism will be the focus of the course.

Early Literacy Community Experience II (Formerly 02.302)

Description

This is Part Two of a two semester course that enhances the experiential learning of students in the education minor participating in the Jumpstart Program. Building on the knowledge base of the first semester, the course allows students to deepen their understanding of the social, emotional and behavioral needs of children in early childhood settings and reflect on how they have integrated what they learned during the experience.

Methods of Teaching Students with Moderate Disabilities

Description

This course focuses on practices to support teaching and learning of students with persistent academic and behavior difficulties. Consisting of four interrelated components, core topics addressed in the course include: (1) Effective classroom management to enhance appropriate behavior, prevent problem behavior, and support students at-risk for and with behavior difficulties; (2) Evidence-based instructional design principles, explicit teaching procedures, and interventions for improving access to the general curriculum and specifically for promoting student capacity for decoding, vocabulary use, fluency, and comprehension; (3) Assistive technology use to support instruction and accessibility; and (4) Collaboration with colleagues and families.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.2100 Introduction to Moderate Disabilities, and EDUC.2200 Educational Assessment of Students with Moderate D.

Mathematics and Problem Solving in the Inclusive E

Description

There is a renewed focus in creating math learning environments in the elementary classroom where students are continuously involved in problem solving. In fact, one of the main goals in elementary math is to provide children with the experiences and support to use a variety of strategies to solve real-world problems. This course will help preservice teachers understand how children with different strengths learn math so the can develop, create, implement, and assess lessons and units that align with the Massachusetts Math Common Core State Standards.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Language and Writing Development

Description

This course focuses on the theories of language development and the relationship of language learning to the development of writing. Major themes of the course include theoretical frameworks, instructional, and curricular issues underpinning of language and writing development of young children and the need of designing language and writing instruction sensitive to the diverse backgrounds of children. Students will examine the major aspects of language and writing development such as cognition, texts, context, culture, and gender, etc. Specifically, students will examine important issues related to assessment and instruction in the teaching of writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Teaching Science through Inquiry in the inclusive

Description

In this course, students will do what scientist do: have a chance to ask and answer questions about the world around us, collect data in a variety of ways and use data to help investigate the world. Students will explore how carefully coaching children to learn the skills that scientists use can build their developing science literacy. Students will work in pairs and, with a mentor teacher in a local school, plan, implement, and assess a science unit. Using high-quality science kits, teaching pairs will focus on a different set of science teaching skills each week. The course instructor and mentor teacher will observe and provide verbal and written-feedback each week. Must take 1 undergraduate laboratory science course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Educational Psychology (Formerly 01.371)

Description

An introduction to the study of human learning, this course covers topics such as efficiency in learning, testing, the psychology of learning, and theories of learning. For undergraduates only.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology or SOCI 1010 Intro to Sociology; and Sophomores, Juniors, or Seniors.

Teaching and Learning with Technology (Formerly 01.373)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Language, Literacy and Culture (Formerly 01.384)

Description

The course examines the role that socio-cultural and socio-political contexts play in children's literacy development, with particular focus on English Language Learners (ELLs). The course is designed to help students understand the complex and dynamic worlds of diverse learners represented in twenty-first century classrooms. Students will learn new and effective approaches to teaching and learning that provides struggling learners, especially English Language Learners a fair and equitable chance to succeed in the learning contexts.

Understanding Education (Formerly 01.391)

Description

The aim of the course is to assist students to build knowledge about educational structures and roles in diverse settings as they consider how education could figure as a calling. Using a broad range of inquiry methodologies and technologies, students will explore areas of self-selected interest in formal educational settings (K-12 or higher education) or informal educational settings (community or health settings, policy, etc.). These explorations will culminate in case presentations in the form of digital stories, in which students will share their findings and discuss future goals in the area of education.

Sheltered English Instruction

Description

This course will prepare students with the knowledge and skills to effectively shelter content instruction to ensure that English Learners (ELs) can access grade level curricula, succeed academically and "contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy" (MA DESE, 2016). This is a service-learning course. Students will be required to spend 15 hours in schools supporting the instruction of ELs and incorporating the skills and strategies that they learn in this course. This course has three overarching goals that are directly aligned with the MA DESE approved course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: EDUC.4100 Pre-practicum.

Exploring Teaching (Formerly 01.401)

Description

This course is for third and fourth year undergraduates who are considering teaching as a career. Focusing on students, teachers, classrooms and schools, the course will provide an overview of the historical, philosophical, legal and societal influences that shape education today. Field work in an elementary, middle or high school will be an integral component of the course.

Understanding Child Development in a Diverse Society (Formerly 01.503)

Description

Examines the major theoretical frameworks of child development and how cultural differences affect development and learning. Focus is on helping students make responsive and culturally relevant pedagogical decisions.

Children with Disabilities in the Classroom (Formerly 01.505)

Description

This course examines the nature of cognitive emotional, developmental, sensory, and physical disabilities that compromise student capacity to make adequate academic progress without special intervention. Legal and ethical responsibilities of the educator in inclusive classroom settings and as an active member of a multidisciplinary learning team are emphasized.

Pre-practicum

Description

The pre-practicum focuses on what it means to be a teacher, as well as the content, dispositions and skills necessary to succeed in the teaching profession. Throughout the pre-practicum, learning about the teaching comes through a variety of opportunities: (1) Structured and focused observations in schools of different demographics; (2) Teaching experiences; (3) Participation in professional seminars on diverse educational topics; (4) Engagement with different types of school professionals around educational topics; (5) Reflection on coursework with a field experience component that bridges the gap between academic knowledge and practitioner knowledge.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.2100 Introduction to Moderate Disabilities, and EDUC.2200 Educational Assessment of Students with Moderate D, and EDUC.2500 Teachin Elementary Social Studies in the Inclusive, and EDUC.2000 Foundations of Reading.

Elementary Education Practicum I

Description

This is the first practicum undertaken by teacher candidates and represents the first 75 hours of their required 300 hour practicum Teacher candidates will spend on day each week for a full semester, working in a regular classroom setting. During the 75 hours, they will be supervised by a Supervising Practitioner and Program Supervisor.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.4000 Sheltered English Instruction, and EDUC.4100 Pre-practicum.

Elementary Education Practicum II

Description

Elementary Education Practicum II is a continuation of practicum I in the same setting and requires completion of 225 hours of teaching in a Massachusetts Public School under the supervision of a school-based Supervising Practitioner and a university Program Supervisor. The teacher candidate must assume responsibility for teaching for a minimum of 100 hours during the practicum. Candidates are required to attend a bi-weekly seminar at the Graduate School of Education throughout the practicum and successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance (CAP).

Prerequisites

Pre-req; EDUC.4200 Elementary Education Practicum I.

Special Education Practicum

Description

The Special Education Practicum is required for a teaching license in special education at the PreK-8 level. The practicum requires 300 hours working, under the direction of the special education teacher (supervising practitioner) and a university program supervisor. The teacher candidate must assume responsibility for teaching for a minimum of 100 hours during the practicum. Candidates are required to attend a bi-weekly seminar at the Graduate School of Education throughout the practicum and successfully complete the Candidate Assessment of Performance (CAP).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.4000 Sheltered English Instruction, and EDUC.4100 Pre-practicum, and EDUC.4200 Elementary Education Practicum I, and EDUC.4300 Elementary Education Practicum II.

Methods of Teaching (Formerly 02.443)

Description

Examines the methods of teaching students with moderate disabilities. Topics include curriculum (including the Massachusetts frameworks), IEPs, and instructional modifications appropriate for students with special needs.

Clinical Seminar

Description

The clinical seminar occurs in conjunction with the elementary and special education practicum. Each seminar session addresses a different section of the Candidate Assessment of Performance (CAP) required for teacher licensure in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The seminar also provides the opportunity for teacher candidates to share experiences with peers and faculty. The seminar prepares candidates for their first teaching interviews by providing the services of the University┬┐s career services who will focus on resume and cover letter writing and by creating opportunities for mock interviews with partner district principals, assistant principals and special education directors

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EDUC.4000 Sheltered English Instruction, and EDUC.4200 Elementary Education Practicum I, and Co-req: EDUC.4300 Elementary Education Practicum II, and EDUC.4400 Special Education Practicum.

STEP 1: Inquiry Approaches to Teaching (Formerly UTL.101)

Description

This course provides students with an introduction to teaching in order for them to explore a career as a middle or high school math or science teacher. During the courses, students pairs teach math and/or science lessons in a local elementary school classroom and receive feedback from a mentor teacher. Additionally, students are introduced to the theory and practice that is necessary to design and deliver excellent instruction. This course is the first step for those students interested in exploring the STEM TEACHING MINOR with UTeach UMass Lowell.

Prerequisites

Math, Science & Engineering Majors only.

STEP 2: Inquiry Based Lesson Design (Formerly UTL.102)

Description

Students who are exploring teaching as a career become familiar with the middle school setting by observing and discussing the middle school environment, and by teaching several lessons in a middle school classroom. They build upon and practice lesson design skills that were developed in Step 1 and also become familiar with excellent science and mathematics curricula for the middle school setting.

Prerequisites

Pre-req UTCH.1010 Step1: Inquiry Approach Teach., Math, Science and Engineering Majors only.

Introduction to STEM Teaching

Description

This course provides an exploration into STEM teaching as a career, emphasizing inquiry-based approaches to teaching science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Students will build and practice lesson design skills using the 5E lessons planning model. They will become familiar with teaching math and science in middle school classrooms by observing, planning, and teaching lessons in a local school.

Prerequisites

Math, Science & Engineering Majors only. This course is a prerequisite to the STEM Teaching minor.

Knowing and Learning in Math and Science (Formerly UTL.201)

Description

The course starts by imparting the understanding that there is a science to learning and by having students examine ideas of what it means for an individual to know or understand something. This course focuses on several essential questions which enable students to explore how knowing and learning are structured with specific emphasis on mathematics and science. Students will come to understand what it means to know something, how we can understand student thinking and how theories of learning inform instructional decisions; in particular students will explore the idea that learning is a social activity. Students are prompted to reflect on their own ways of looking at various ideas and concepts and to consider alternative perspectives. Students will conduct an analysis of reasoning processes through a clinical interview process, one-on-one with learners engaging in problem solving. This course is required for the STEM TEACHING MINOR.

Prerequisites

Math, Science & Engineering Majors only.

Interactions and Equity (Formerly UTL.202)

Description

This course examines the organization of instructional settings that maximize learning for all. Students will examine gender issues, cultural issues, bilingual education and learning disabilities as they impact learner success. A major portion of the course is a field experience in which students interview high school teachers, observe a high school classroom, then teach three lessons. The purpose of these experiences is to ensure that students recognize the diversity of students and their specific learning needs. This course is required for STEM TEACHING MINOR.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: UTCH.1020 Inquiry-based Lesson Design, or UTCH.1030 Introduction to STEM Teaching, and UTCH.2010 Knowing and Learning in Math and Science, and UTCH.3020 Research Methods. For Math, Science and Engineering majors only.

Perspectives on Mathematics and Science (Formerly UTL.204)

Description

This course examines the history and philosophy of mathematics and science. Students will explore a selection of topics and episodes in the history of science and mathematics recognizing that many gains in knowledge have emerged through struggle, and in spite of resistance from cultural, religious and social structures. Students will learn that ideas in science and mathematics are dynamic and that disagreement can often lead to major breakthroughs. Students must think critically about how K-12 STEM education texts portray the history and philosophy of science and mathematics. This course is required for the STEM TEACHING MINOR.

Prerequisites

Math, Science & Engineering Majors only.

Project-Based Instruction (Formerly UTL.301)

Description

This is a key component of the Minor as it engages students in designing, implementing and employing a project-based curriculum. Students will observe project-based learning in high schools, before creating and leading their own field-based unit. The unit must incorporate major components of project-based learning, namely collaboration, formulating questions, making predictions, designing investigations, collecting and analyzing data, making products and sharing ideas. This course is required for the STEM TEACHING MINOR.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: UTCH.2020 Interactions and Equity, and UTCH.3020 Research Methods, and UTCH.4410 Teaching English Learners-Secondary. For Math, Science and Engineering students in the STEM Teaching Minor.

Research Methods (Formerly UTL.302)

Description

The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of and the ability to use tools that scientists use to solve problems. Students will also learn how scientists communicate their findings and engage in peer-review. Students design and carry out four independent inquiries, which they write up and present in the manner that is common in the scientific community. Students will work in multidisciplinary teams.. The course is divided between class and lab sessions, but is primarily lab-based. The topics of the class sessions are: Curiosity and Scientific Inquiry, Experimental Design and Analysis, Statistics, Modeling, Presenting Scientific Information. Students conduct their inquiries, incorporate statistics to interpret their results and present their scientific work orally. This course is required for the STEM TEACHING MINOR.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: UTCH.1020 Inquiry-based Lesson Design, or UTCH.1030 Introduction to STEM Teaching. For Math, Science and Engineering majors only.

Practicum (Formerly UTL.401)

Description

This is the culminating experience to the STEM Teaching Minor and must be taken for initial teacher licensure. Students are required to spend a minimum of 12 weeks (full time) teaching a STEM subject in a middle or high school classroom and attend a weekly practicum seminar. Candidates are required to have (I) completed the STEM Teaching minor, (II) passed both of the required MTEL examinations and (III) maintained a minimum overall GPA of 2.7.For MATH, Science and Engineering student in the STEM Teaching minor.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: UTCH.3010, and UTCH.2010, and UTCH.2040, and UTCH.3020, and UTCH.4410, (Math and Computer Science Majors: must also have MATH.2100 and MATH.4270).

Teaching Emergent Bilingual Students (Formerly 02.541 & UTL.441)

Description

The purpose of this course is to prepare new secondary teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that the growing population of English learners (ELs) in PK-12 schools can achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources. The course will provide aspiring teachers with practical research-based methods, strategies, and protocols to integrate subject area content, language, and literacy. Successful completion of this course provides SEI (Sheltered English Immersion) endorsement, which is required for teaching in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This is a service learning course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Math, Science and Engineering majors in the STEM Teaching Minor.

Directed Study (Formerly UTL.491)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.