All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Psychological Science (Formerly 47.101)

Description

An introduction course that focuses on application of the scientific method to major areas of psychology: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental and physical health. The course addresses the importance of social and cultural diversity, ethics, variations in human functioning, and applications to life and social action both within these areas and integrated across them. The research basis for knowledge in the field is emphasized.

Professional Development in Psychology (Formerly 47.201)

Description

This course in intended for psychology majors to explore pathways to success as an undergraduate in psychology, especially including information about psychology as an empirical science, and careers and graduate school in psychology. Opportunities for research and service learning will be discussed. The course is required for all students who are planning to apply to one of the Concentrations in Psychology. (Prerequisite: 9 credits of coursework in Psychology)

Social Psychology (Formerly 47.209)

Description

Presents an introduction to the study of social behavior in interpersonal relationships, groups, organizations, and the community: Diversity in regard to groups of peoples, cultures, and views is emphasized. Topics include non-verbal communication, social attraction, attitudes and attitude change, group dynamics, prejudice, labeling, stereotyping, interpersonal influence, and applications to social problems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Psychology of Personality (Formerly 47.232)

Description

Serves as an introduction to the study of human personality including such topics as self- concept, anxiety and adjustment, and achievement motivation. Psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive, and behavioral theories of personality are stressed with consideration of the interplay between theory and research.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Community Psychology (Formerly 47.255)

Description

Surveys the nature and practice of community psychology, including principles of community organization and change as seen in such areas as education, mental health, the workplace, health care, justice system, corrections and social services. Students may participate in field research or projects in the community, and classroom work will include discussion of the field experiences of the participants. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Child and Adolescent Development (Formerly 47.260)

Description

The study of childhood and adolescence. The course begins with an overview of major theoretical perspectives, research methods, and ethical issues in human development. Based on a chronological approach, the course covers prenatal development and birth, infancy, childhood and adolescence, and the transition to adulthood.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Research I: Methods (Formerly 47.269)

Description

An introductory course on the fundamentals of empirical research in psychological science. Instruction will promote understanding and competence in the basic vocabulary of psychological research, addressing information literacy, measurement, reliability, and validity in observed variables and unobserved constructs. Students will learn critical components of experimental, quasi-experimental, and correlational designs, as well as the basics of descriptive statistics, hypothesis and statistical testing, and matching design to analysis strategies. Students will demonstrate this knowledge through he preparation of a research proposal. Finally, this course will provide students a strong basis from which to pursue advanced coursework in a variety of methodological approaches to psychological research. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Abnormal Psychology (Formerly 47.272)

Description

Presents an introduction to the study of various patterns of mental, behavioral, and personality disorders with consideration of issues of diagnosis, etiology, and treatment in terms of contemporary theory, research, and practice.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Brain, Mind & Behavior (Formerly 47.273)

Description

Surveys issues and topics dealing with the physiological and evolutionary bases of behavior. Biological systems and processes that influence behavior are considered, with particular emphasis on brain mechanisms. Recent discoveries in the neurosciences will be presented. Methods of research are reviewed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Theories of Learning (Formerly 47.276)

Description

Traces the development of theories of learning from earlier global theories to more recent and more specific ones. Behavioral, cognitive, and physiological approaches are compared. Current issues of importance in the study of learning also are stressed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Sensation and Perception (Formerly 47.277)

Description

The course focuses on human sensations and perceptions. Students will examine how people know the objects and events of the world through hearing, seeing, smelling, tasting, moving, and touching. Students will also examine the foundations of experiences which correspond to independent measures of the world (veridical) and those which do not (illusory).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Cognitive Psychology (Formerly 47.278)

Description

Examines the psychological bases of verbal and visual reasoning, logical and creative thought-processes, and linguistic and conceptual behaviors. The nature and limits of knowledge and creative expression are discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Psychology and Law (Formerly 47.305)

Description

this course is an introduction to many topics representing major fields of study within psychology and law. Topics may include: eyewitness testimony, lie detection, jury selection, child protection, forensic interviews, and the death penalty. In this course, students will be exposed to the diversity of interests among legal psychologists as well as innovative and important ideas, theories, and scientific research findings. Through readings, the study of actual cases, and presentations from guest speakers, students will gain more understanding of how psychologists study and contribute to the legal system.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Industrial/Organizational Psychology (Formerly 47.308)

Description

An introduction to the application of psychological principles and methods to the work domain. Students will develop an understanding of the individual, social, and environmental factors as they relate to organizational performance. Intended as an introduction to the field of Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology, topics include personnel selection and evaluation, training and development, attitudes and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, diversity, organizational structure and climate, and job design and working conditions.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Learning and Behavior (Formerly 47.312)

Description

Examines various methods and techniques suitable for the modification of human behavior, based on the principles and findings of experimental studies of animal and human behavior. Considers how such methods can be used in education, mental health and corrections, and self-directed personal change.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Dynamics of Interpersonal Relations (Formerly 47.328)

Description

Presents an analysis of psychological dynamics in interpersonal behavior, emphasizing such topics as interpersonal communication, self-disclosure, personal styles of interaction and techniques of change. The primary focus is on the behavior of the students themselves.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 General Psychology; Junior or Senior level.

History of Psychology (Formerly 47.332)

Description

Examines the historical roots of psychology from the pre-scientific psychologies of the ancient Greeks to the twentieth century schools of the introspectionists, the Gestalt psychologists, and psychoanalysts. Historical resolutions of recurring issues are contrasted with modern resolutions.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Psychology of Consciousness (Formerly 47.333)

Description

Introduces students to psychological theories and studies of the mind-body dualism, mind-brain identity, and the emergence of mind. Studies of psychosomatic disease and healing imagery, sleep and hypnosis, "subconscious" perception and "extra sensory" perception, multiple personalities and "split brain" patients are discussed. The questions of animal awareness and computer consciousness are also considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Psychology and Women (Formerly 47.335)

Description

Considers such topics as: the psychology of sex differences; biological bases of psychological sex differences; the nature of female sexuality; clinical theory and practice concerning women; women as mental patients and mental health consumers; implications for psychology and for women's status.

Prerequisites

Junior Level, or Permission of Instructor.

Culture and Psychology (Formerly 47.336)

Description

Provides an analysis to the impact of culture, socio-historical, and social influences on psychological processes and outcomes. Students will also learn about techniques for studying the influence of culture including cross-cultural methods and population-specific methods. Through careful analysis of research literature, this class will examine a variety of contexts within the U.S. and internationally. Topics will include identity development, immigration, acculturation, socialization, and social interactions among groups.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Health Psychology (Formerly 47.345)

Description

An examination of psychological aspects of human health, both physical and mental, and the processes of adjustment and growth. Consideration is given to the interplay of health and illness with emphasis on psychological methods of overcoming and preventing illness and of enhancing physical and emotional well-being.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Human Sexuality (Formerly 47.351)

Description

Addresses the biological, psychosocial, and attitudinal aspects of human sexuality through lectures, discussions, films from a variety of perspectives.

Prerequisites

Junior Level, or Permission of Instructor.

Psychological Testing (Formerly 47.352)

Description

A survey of major tests and techniques used to assess cognitive abilities, personality and vocational interests; an introduction to the various professional settings in which testing and assessment methods are used (e.g. school/education, mental health, rehabilitation, employment and personnel selection, criminal justice). Students learn to administer, score, and interpret specific tests and learn how to develop a case study or report based on test data and related information.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Sport and Exercise Psychology (Formerly 47.355)

Description

The course will cover topics such as motivation, arousal and anxiety in performance, performance enhancement, youth sport and family interactions, leadership, cooperation and competition, team cohesion, gender issues, exercise and mental health, and psychological factors in injury prevention and rehabilitation.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Adult Development and Aging (Formerly 47.360)

Description

Begins with an overview of recent theoretical perspectives on adult development and aging. In chronological sequence, it presents the stages of adulthood and concludes with death and dying. Topics covered include personal, family, and vocational development through adulthood, gender pattern differences, and the impact of changing demographics, including the lengthening of the life span.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology and PSYC 2600 Child & Adolescent Development.

Developmental Psychopathology (Formerly 47.361)

Description

Examines behavior problems of childhood and adolescence across developmental transitions with a focus on the interaction of risk and protective factors in the child and his or her social context (e.g., family, school, friendships). Problems such as depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, ADHD, learning disabilities, and the consequences of trauma and maltreatment are addressed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology and PSYC 2600 Child & Adolescent Development.

Psychology of Developmental Disabilities (Formerly 47.362)

Description

This course exaines a range of developmental disabilities, their etiology, consideration of underlying brain function, assessment procedures, and current diagnostic, treatment and educational approaches. In addition, the impact of disability on individuals and the families of those affected, cultural and social aspects of disability, and current practices in service provision will be considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology and PSYC 2600 Child & Adolescent Development.

Introduction to Disability Studies (Formerly 47.363)

Description

This course provides students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds with the opportunity to examine their own mental model(attitudes/values/ assumptions) of disability. It includes an overview of the nature of intellectual disability and other disabilities and it provides opportunities to explore and understand the historical social response to disability. Students will look at a range of strategies for providing support and intervention and they will learn about how to effect change through a variety of strategies, including advocacy.

Prerequisites

Pre Req: PSYC.1010, General Psychology; student may not enroll if already has credit for 59.363.

Psychology of Decision-Making

Description

We spend billions of dollars every year to address issues caused by poor decisions: jurors convict innocent defendants, employees do not adequately contribute to retirement accounts, young adults smoke cigarettes, etc. Why do people make irrational decisions? This course will provide a comprehensive overview of decision making with an emphasis on applying psychological theory and research to tackle issues in the areas of law, economics, health, etc. Students will learn theoretical concepts to improve their own decision-making as well as help them to positively influence the decisions of others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Research II: Statistics (Formerly 47.369)

Description

An intermediate level course building on competence in quantitative reasoning skills and the fundamentals of research methods, and focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics and their application and interpretation. The course will include basic computational approaches; the primary goal is for students to develop the ability to articulate and apply statistical concepts, and communicate statistical results. The course includes topics in basic inferential statistics from z-scores up to and including chi-square and factorial ANOVA. Students will learn to use a database and conduct statistical analyses using standard software packages. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods with 'C' or better.

Comparative Psychology: Animal Behavior (Formerly 47.372)

Description

Comparative psychology is a discipline that explores the behavior of animals, both human and non-human, using evolutionary theory as a unifying principle. The contributions of evolutionary pressures, genetics, development, learning, and social influence will be explored in variety of animal species and cross-species comparisons made where appropriate. Specific topics covered will include causes and development of behavior, control and organization of behavior, behavioral adaptations, mating systems and reproduction, parental care, defensive behaviors, aggression, foraging, communication, and animal cognition. Students will be required to take a fieldtrip during the course of the semester.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Research III: Laboratory (Formerly 47.375)

Description

An advanced course in which students design and carry out an empirical research project from start to finish, resulting in an individually written research report using APA style and an oral presentation. The primary goal is for students to experience discovery by completing an original study that reasonably extends the prior research literature. Topics may vary, reflecting the interests of the instructor. Students will perform literature reviews; formulate a research question; operationalize variables; develop research designs; obtained ethical review and approval; and collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of the research process in assessments that may include assignments, quizzes, or exams. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.3690 Research II with 'C' or better; Junior/ Senior level and completed 15 credits in Psychology.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Selected Topics.

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as racism, diversity, empowerment, and social change in the contest of social and community life. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Racism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is racism. In this course we will investigate roots of racism, kinds of racism, reasons for perpetuation of racism, possible solutions to ending racism. Many believer that racism is a thing of the past. Yet, research shows that many of us are unconsciously racist and hurt communities of color without any malicious intent. We will explore our own posting in terms of racism. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Immigration

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is immigration, a very important issue in the United States and around the world. In this seminar we will study the complex process of migration from a community social psychological point of view. Motivations, expectations, acculturation, immigrant status, deportations, policy and more will be covered. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Prevent Youth Violence

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is youth violence, which continues to be a major public health concern in the United States. Preventing youth violence is an important component of creating peaceful and safe neighborhoods and just communities. In this course, we will use ecological and multicultural perspectives to understand different types of youth violence, the contexts in which they occur, and intervention strategies to address the violence. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Bridging Differences

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course explores dilemmas that can emerge when working to bridge diverse groups in community-based work. The seminar will be organized around narratives that address multiple dimensions of diversity including race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, and religion. Too often, guidelines for addressing very complex diversity dynamics are presented as neatly packaged lists of recommendations. However, it is within the stories of the challenges and dilemmas that the complexity of the political, historical, social, and psychological dynamics of diversity are most evident. Students will explore examples of everyday diversity challenges and utilize psychological theories to better understand how the challenges can be shaped by struggles over limited resources, deep historical conflicts between groups, privilege dynamics, intragroup dynamics, organizational cultural norms, and/or other issues. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar: Personality (Formerly 47.472)

Description

Focuses on a variety of theoretical conceptualizations of the productive personality, psychodiagnostic tools and techniques and case histories. Students develop and enhance their professional skills with respect to presentation of self, writing, and psychological diagnostic techniques.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology (Formerly 47.473)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as social aspects of health and illness; inequalities in education; the impact of globalization; attitude formation and prejudice; and psychology of sex roles. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Social (In)justice

Description

An advances seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is social injustice, its causes, manifestations, explanations, and social psychological theories that help us understand them. We will explore how and why social injustice prevails in today's world full of resources; why small number of people own majority of world's wealth; why some countries are poorer than others. We will study our own standpoints and where they come from and we will work on possible remedies that could lead to a more just world.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Achievement Motivation

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course will cover psychological theory and research on the various factors that explain people's motivation to achieve and their performance in different domains. These factors include emotions, needs, personality, efficiency, group membership, identity, goal type, and context. Course goals include honing students' ability to understand, critique, write about, and discuss theoretical and empirical papers within psychology. Students will also develop their skills in generating testable hypotheses. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: the Mind-Body Perspective in Communication

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on the role communication processes (including Intra-Personal, interpersonal, and Mediated-Communication) play in a variety of health related contexts, effects, and processes. Included will be: Self-regulation theories; placebo and nocebo effects; unconscious processes; biofeedback effects and mechanisms; hypnosis; imagery; pain management; emotion regulation; well-being; and the ability to consciously influence autonomic processes such as the immune and endocrine systems. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Health Campaigns

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will review the stat of the science and art of effective medial health campaigns in light o how they are developed, delivered, and evaluated. Seminar participants will discuss and critically analyze campaigns relative to their effects on health-related awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Workplace Diversity

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Over the course of our lives, many of us will be working in organizations that include diverse workers, and thus it is important to understand the issues that shape interpersonal and system dynamics within such settings. In this seminar, we review theories and research relevant to how race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disability dynamics affect workplace systems. Classes will be highly interactive and discussion-oriented as students learn about the challenges diverse organizations face in fostering positive working relationships and about strategies adopted to enhance the effectiveness of the diverse workplace. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Psychology of Sustainability

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. In this course we will explore unequal distribution of resources and power and the culture of consumerism in all parts of the world, including the United States. Once people are aware can make informed choices about what and why and how much they buy, about the companies that produce and sell the products and the political views they support. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology (Formerly 47.474)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as psychology of the family and parent-child relations; infant development; adjustment during adulthood; and death and dying. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Adolescent Identity

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will explore the phenomenon of adolescent identity development, beginning with Erik Erikson's seminal work on the subject and continuing through contemporary treatments. We will examine development of identity from extended consciousness, a sense of autobiographical self (1-2 years), to a theory of mind (4-5 years), conception of a personal fable (10-14 years), and the emergence of full life stories (17-25 years). Specific issues of focus will include ethnic, social class, and gender role identity development, identity crises and resolutions, and representations of relationships with family, friends, school, and work. Students will write and analyze their own life stories, as well as lead discussions, and prepare a research paper. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Psychology of Education

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar takes an intensive look at the psychology of education and of learning. We will read about theories of education, research on learning, and study some historical and current trends in both formal education (school) and informal learning environments (hobby subcultures, museums,camps, etc). Readings will include both historical examples (John Dewey, Jane Addams, Paolo Friere) and schooling systems, and policymakers in higher education. In addition to reading, class discussion, and engaging hands on exercises, students will plan and deliver a term-length creative project on the psychology of learning and education. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Role of Trauma in Child Development

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Trauma is a relatively common experience of childhood. Far too many children and youth in the US are witnesses to domestic violence and victims of abuse, neglect, and other violent crimes. Worldwide, millions of children have been disabled, injured, orphaned, or recruited as child soldiers in armed conflicts. When natural disasters strike, children are often among those affected most severely. How do these experiences influence subsequent growth and development? This seminar examines the role of trauma in child development form an ecological perspective with a focus on neurophysiological, affective, and relational systems. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology (Formerly 47.475)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as health psychology and behavioral medicine; the nature and causes of or interventions for specific psychological disorders (e.g.,autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia); the community mental health movement; clinical methods of assessment. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Women's Health

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Physical health and illness do not occur in a vacuum. Rather, they are embedded in a complex and dynamic system. This biological (e.g., disease process), psychological (e.g., mental health status) and social (e.g., culture) factors. Topics will include reproductive health, cardiovascular illness, substance use, and eating behaviors. Sexual orientation, race, socioeconomic status and other issues of diversity will be integrated throughout the semester. Students will learn from reading and discussing scholarly articles and book chapters, critically watching relevant videos, and writing individual literature review papers. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Autism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological disorder that typically appears before the age of three and immediately and profoundly affects a young child's ability to communicate, develop language, form social relationships and respond appropriately to environmental cues. Over the last 15-20 years, autism has received an increasing level of attention in both scientific arenas and the popular press. Most recent estimates are that about 1 in 50 children are affected. This seminar will examine issues in the etiology, characteristics and treatment of autism and related developmental disabilities. The seminar will also explore some of the more prominent theories and controversies surrounding these disorders. Much of the seminar will be focused on a behavioral approach to understanding and treating children with autism and significant intellectual challenges. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology & Behavioral Medicine

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course examines physical health and illness by integrating information about biological processes, psychological characteristics, and social contexts. We will discuss the following topics throughout the course: the roles of personality, emotion, mental health, and human development in physical well-being; the relationship between health psychology and other disciplines such as nursing, anthropology and genetics; the significance of prevention and public policy in physical health; and the ways in which health psychology is important in a variety of health problems, such as heart disease, cancer, and obesity. This i s a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Language Assessment and Intervention in Autism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of behavioral language assessments and empirically validated interventions to improve language and communication for young children with autism and related disabilities. Successful completion of the course will help prepare students for a position as a behavior technician. Students will participate in class discussions, presentations, and application activities throughout the semester. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Autism in Adolescents & Young Adults

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on adolescents and young adults on the "high-functioning" end of the autism spectrum. Students will learn the behavioral and psychological characteristics associated with this population, diagnostic procedures, etiology, consider various interventions for this population, and discuss current controversies in the field. We will also consider the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on individual and their families. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Sexual Offending

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The purpose of this course is to examine current psychological theory and research relating to the causes and consequences of sexual aggression. It is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists. The course is organized topically. We begin by reading and thinking about the social construction of masculinity and femininity (especially through representations in the media) and how these constructions might contribute to sexual aggression. The bulk of the course is devoted to an examination of psychological processes related to victimization and perpetration. The course concludes with a discussion of several special topics and an examination of rape prevention and education. Special topics may include a focus on juvenile and female offenders, specific risk factors for perpetration, campus sexual assault, pedophilia, child maltreatment, pornography, recidivism rates, offender laws, and victim testimonies. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends (Formerly 47.477)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider current trends in psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as contemporary models of addictive behavior; the interaction of psychology and law; existential psychology; psychology of technological change. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Addictions

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The focus of this seminar is on the psychology of addictions. Drawing upon current theory and research, we will look at the nature and causes of the problem behaviors associated with alcohol and drug use. We will also consider whether problems in such areas as shopping, eating, gambling, sex, video games, and the Internet can be understood as forms of addictions. In addition, we will examine the implications of whether or not such addictions should be viewed as diseases, and we will evaluate the relative importance of biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Psychology & Law

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course is an introduction to many topics representing major fields of study within psychology and law. Topics may include: eyewitness testimony, lie detection, jury selection, child protection, forensic interviews, and the death penalty. In this course, students will learn about the diversity of interests among legal findings. The main goal is to provide students with an understanding of relevant theory, empirical findings, and research methodology. Guest speakers will enhance learning. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSYC.3050 Psychology and Law.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Generational Identities and Relations

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on generational identities and intergenerational relations. Generation is an important dimension of human experience in modern societies and a key aspect of self-identity, but it is also linked to tensions and misunderstandings between people of different ages. Specific topics to be addressed include: cultural and historical differences in ideas about generation and cohort; the development of generational identities: generation, mass marketing, and consumerism; the politics of generation and intergenerational tensions; bilateral socialization and positive intergenerational exchange; similarities and differences between Baby Boomers. Gen-X'ers, and Millennials; ageism and age segregation, and; generativity and the future of our planet. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Psychology of Globalization

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. We know that we are part of a global world and that many of the things we buy and consume are produced in other countries. But what do we know of how they are made: Do we understand that there may be hidden costs in the price we pay for goods at the supermarket, in a coffee shop: Understanding the nature of globalization and its consequences is critical for us to be effective citizens in the world. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Cognitive Psychology (Formerly 47.478)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in cognitive psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as attention and memory; mental imagery; decision-making; language; applications of cognitive psychology to education. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Cognitive Psychology: Educational Applications

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in cognitive psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar is designed to give you an in-depth look into the impact of cognitive psychology on education. We will look at basic processes, including those of attention, memory, and motivation, starting first from basic theoretical principles. We will then read papers that have taken these theoretical principles as a starting point and applied them to real-life issues in education, such as exam performance and students' self-evaluations of their own performance. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSYC.2780 Cognitive Psychology.

Seminar in Behavioral Psychology

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in behavioral psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as conceptual issues in behavioral psychology; applied behavior analysis; and the applications of behavioral psychology to education, language, symbolic behavior, and attention. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSY.2760 Theories of Learning, or PSYC.3120 Learning and Behavior.

Concentration Practicum I (Formerly 47.480)

Description

This is the first course in a two-course sequence that accompanies that required field placement for undergraduate psychology majors who are registered in a concentration. Practicum I must be taken before Practicum II. The accompanying field placement may either be a research or a service practicum. This is a general course, which will fulfill the requirement for students in any concentration. The course will focus integrating student placement experiences with relevant empirical literature. Topics will draw on the research literature to frame the placement experience and will include working in diverse environments, becoming aware of organizational structures, responding to work related stress, and understanding how the science of psychology applies to the placement. Students will also integrate their placement experiences with the empirical literature from their respective concentrations by identifying and reviewing empirical work that addresses some aspect of their practicum.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.2010 Professional Development in P, and a 'C' or better in PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and Junior Standing.

Concentration Practicum II (Formerly 47.481)

Description

This is the second course in the two-course sequence that accompanies the required field placement for undergraduate psychology majors who are registered in a concentration. This course can only be taken after the successful completion of PSYC.4800 Concentration Practicum I, in the previous term. The field placement may either be a research or a service practicum. This is a general course, which will fulfill the requirement for students in any concentration. The second course will focus developing a research paper that integrates the empirical literature with the placement experience. The course will continue to focus on topics including working in diverse environments, working within organizations, responding to work related stress, understanding how the science of psychology applies to the placement, and writing informally and formally about placement experiences.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.4800 Concentration Practicum I, with a grade of "B" or better.

Community Service Learning (1, 2, or 3 credits) (Formerly 47.486/586)

Description

Students will take an applied role in the community where they will have the opportunity to provide some form of meaningful service to individuals, groups or communities. Students will meet regularly with a designated faculty member on campus to consider their experiences in the context of current psychological thought. In some instances, the commitment to community service may extend over the course of a full year. Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. 1, 2 or 3 credits. This course may be repeated but no more than 12 credits total from any combination of PSYC.4860, PSYC.4880 and PSYC.4910 may be counted toward the degree.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Research Service Learning (Formerly 47.488)

Description

Students will take an applied role in faculty supervised research where they will provide a meaningful contribution to a research program or particular study. Students will meet regularly with a designated faculty member to discuss the research process and rationale for relevant components of the project including literature review, research design, procedures, data collection, entry, and analysis. In some instances the commitment to research may extend over the course of a full year. Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory, 1, 2, or 3 credits. This course may be repeated but no more than 12 credits total from any combination of psyc.4860, PSYC.4880, and PSYC.4910 may be counted toward the degree.

Directed Study: Psychology (Formerly 47.491)

Description

Through frequent consultation with the instructor, the student carries out the investigation of a particularly specialized area of interest. This course may be repeated, but no more than 12 credits from any combination of PSYC.486, PSYC.488, and PSYC.491 may be counted toward the degree.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Practicum in Psychology (Formerly 47.496)

Description

A program of practical experience for Psychology majors only. Specific requirements vary, but the Practicum experience enables Junior and Senior level students to work and study in a variety of areas related to psychological practice and research (mental health agencies, community agencies and groups, work settings, schools, prisons, group homes, etc.). Students meet regularly as a class on campus with the designated instructor to discuss their experiences and to learn more about the settings in which psychologists practice and the challenges that psychologists confront. Practicum may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. (Field Placement Required)

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology; and Junior or Senior level.