All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Sociology (Formerly 48.101)

Description

Serves as the basic course in sociology. Emphasis is directed at the ways in which social institutions such as government, schools, the economy, social class, and the family develop and influence our lives. It is concerned not only with presenting various ways to understand our relationship to society but also with ways to change it. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Social Anthropology (Formerly 48.102)

Description

Using the comparative approach to society, this course examines several distinct cultures as a means of understanding both the universal constants and the variations in human societies.

A Novel Approach to Sociology (Formerly 48.111)

Description

Examines major sociological themes through analysis of literature, primarily major works of fiction.

Sociology Goes to the Movies (Formerly 48.112)

Description

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to survey primary sociological texts and view films, offer commentary on and analysis of social behavior.

Social Problems (Formerly 48.115)

Description

This entry level course uses the core concept of social problems to introduce basic social science reasoning-how social scientist define research questions, develop systematic methods to study them, gather evidence, search for pattern, in link findings to existent knowledge,. Cases provide opportunities to discuss how private problems develop into public issue, illustrating sociology as a discipline that evolves in response to social conflicts and inequalities. The course also meets General Education requirements for Ethics and Diversity.

Foundations of Social Analysis (Formerly 48.201)

Description

This intermediate-level class deepens students' analytical skills beyond intro level preparing for more abstract work in Theory and Methods courses. It also prepares students for more complex integration of theory, methods and issue content in 300 level courses. This course will attend to developing students' ability to recognize, and write social science research papers.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology; Sociology majors.

Public Sociology (Formerly 48.205)

Description

Public sociology includes sociological initiatives targeting non-university audiences and serving the public good. This course will 1) introduce and critique the various conceptualizations of public sociology linking them to broad schools of sociological theory; 2) explore alternative field models and methods, preparing students for field projects in future semesters; and 3) expose students to sociological practitioners and practices compatible with the mission of the university and department. From a liberal arts perspective, the course stresses critical thinking and communication skills.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Food (Formerly 48.210)

Description

This course is about Sociology of food exploring the connection between food, society and culture. Our food choices are influenced by age, gender, ethnicity, class and religion. History of food and methods of food production contribute to understanding of social relations among individuals and social changes in society. This course will examine 1. role of food in society, culture and change, 2. changes in food production from simple to complex societies and 3. problems associated with new systems of food production locally and globally.

Sociology of American Education (Formerly 48.303/SOCI.3030)

Description

Course introduces students to ongoing debates in the field of Sociology regarding the American educational system, its structures and functions and how it relates to issues of inequality by race, class and gender. Students are expected to explore, examine and evaluate the current issues relating to the system of education in the United States.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Cultures of the World (Formerly 48.212)

Description

Focuses on a different country or region each time it is given. Students examine the traditional culture, recent history, economic development, class structure, and international relations of the area covered.

Sociology of Immigration (Formerly 48.307/SOCI.3070)

Description

The United States is frequently described as a country with a proud history of immigration. As a result, citizens and residents of the U.S. often identify their home as a nation of people who make up a melting pot country. While useful and insightful, the melting pot metaphor requires comparison with additional explanations of immigration and immigrant experiences. In order to provide deeper comprehension of the topic matter, this course offers sociological examination of immigration processes, laws, and debates. Three areas compose the main portion of class content: historical accounts and theories, legislation, and the social, economical, and political experiences of immigrants.

Sociology of Sports (Formerly 48.340/SOCI.3400)

Description

Examines the history of modern sports at the amateur and professional levels and international competition. The impact of race, sex, economics, and politics on the institution of sports will also be examined.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Peacemaking Alternatives (Formerly 48.215)

Description

Examines various positive alternatives to war and violence, including disarmament, nonviolence, conflict resolution, and the United Nations. Students do volunteer work with an activist agency or interview an activist. The course stresses the historical and contemporary role of peace movements and allied social-change movements such as feminism, civil rights and environmentalism.

Sociology of War and Peace (Formerly 48.216)

Description

The purpose of this course is to examine critically the social forces that contribute to war, war's social consequences, and the possibilities for creating a more peaceful world.

Social Movements (Formerly 48.382/SOCI.3820)

Description

Considers organized action undertaken to alter the social position of a group. Organization, techniques of action, motivation of participants, and group ideologies are studied. Materials from historical, social, psychological, and sociological sources are used.

Self-Assessment and Career Development (Formerly 48.220)

Description

Studies the meaning of work in our society. Class participants will assess their own life experiences and develop plans to integrate interests, values, and abilities into meaningful and realistic life/work options.

Prerequisites

Jr. or Sr. status only.

Sociology of Disability (Formerly 48.225)

Description

This course is organized around several key questions that are used to study the concepts of disability and ability from a variety of sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives. Specifically, the course explores representations of disability in popular culture and medical discourses to discuss disability and ability as social constructs. By looking at various literary and cultural representations, this course investigates constructions of the disabled and abled body, how this becomes politicized, and the implications of these constructions.

Sociology of the Family (Formerly 48.231)

Description

Studies the nature of the family in contemporary society, with particular emphasis on the family in America. What functions does the family perform in modern society? How is it changing? How do these changes affect our lives?

Race and Ethnicity (Formerly 48.234)

Description

This course locates and studies the sociological dynamics of race and ethnic relations in the United States as it pertains to all groups. The course material presents theories and models that explain periods of conflict and cooperation between diverse sets of people. While providing some historical background, the course focuses primarily on recent and contemporary situations.

Sociological Approaches to the Environment (Formerly 48.236)

Description

Focusing on case studies of recent and pending environmental disasters, this course will trace how political, social, economic and cultural arrangements and choices contribute to environmental catastrophes and their resolution. In order to identify possibilities for agency, students will play several environmental games in which they will assume roles in the global economy, governmental and civil society to identify possibilities for agency. As a final project, students will describe a recent disaster identifying both structures that create environmental stresses and the options that might exist for structural changes. The project is intended to develop both critical thinking and communication skills.

Sociology of Gender (Formerly 48.240)

Description

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of gender studies. A variety of topics are presented, such as gender stratification, work and family, sexual identities, media representations of women and men, women's movement, and violence against women. Feminist theories and methods are also introduced.

Introduction to Labor Studies (Formerly 48.245)

Description

This foundational course has two overarching learning objectives: (1) to give students basic empirical knowledge and analytical tools to understand the context of work in the United States at the dawn of the twenty-first century and (2) to give students an understanding of how labour unions work, what has been their impact historically, and what their role is in contemporary society. The course will be explicitly interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from history, sociology, economics, political science, and psychology to offer and introduction to understanding work and labor through and analytic lens. In addition, the course will include a service-learning component in collaboration with the UML Labor Education Program.

Sociology of Deviance (Formerly 48.255)

Description

Analysis of how social institutions define and respond to various forms of social deviance, from individual mental illness to gang violence to illegal acts by governments and corporations. Attention will be paid to the construction and management of deviant identities, the role played by social status, and the social importance of institutions of social control.

Political Sociology (Formerly 48.256)

Description

Focuses on the development and use of power in modern society. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of American political institutions to economic institutions, to social class, and to supporting ideologies.

Self and Society (Formerly 48.270)

Description

An examination of the relationship between individuals and the social world around them. The course examines the underlying structures that pattern human interaction. Topics include the social construction of the self, the construction of social reality, and the sociology of emotions, among others.

Sociology of the Gun (Formerly 48.276)

Description

This course examines the social impact of guns on the American psyche, from deer hunters and intergenerational family bonds to street gangs and broken families, from collectors and recreational users to hospital trauma. Self-defense issues are discussed within the context of the Second Amendment. The conflict between pro-gun and anti-gun special interest groups and the evolution of an American gun culture will be studied.

Drugs and Society (Formerly 48.280)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the cultural and poplitical qualities of drugs in society. The course provides a historical and cross-cultural overview of the use of organic and simple processed substances, as well as a history of drug policy in the United States.

Sociology of Human Rights (Formerly 48.301)

Description

Examines the politically divergent definitions of rights and freedoms. Attention will be paid to the activities of international human rights organizations to the human rights policies of the major powers. Various current human rights issues will be examined. Case histories may include the Soviet Union, Northern Ireland, South Africa, Afro-Americans, Armenians and Palestinians.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Seminar on Homelessness: Lowell and Mumbai

Description

This course will focus on understanding housing insecurity by looking closely at what it means to be homeless in two very different cities, located across the world from each other: Lowell, USA and Mumbai, India. In doing so, we will use this comparison to highlight the root causes of homelessness within a global context, including how certain social situations, policies and innovations may exacerbate and /or improve this situation. Simultaneously, students will gain a first-hand understanding of homelessness in Lowell through performing 3-4 hours of service per week at a local shelter and/or drop-in center.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Honors College or Sociology Major or Sociology Additional Major or permission of instructor.

Science, Technology and Society (Formerly SOCI.2220)

Description

The complex relationships between science, technology, and society are commonly obscured by a popular belief in the value-neutrality and objectivity of science and technology. Being able to analyze that belief as a myth is necessary in order to engage in critical analysis of the ways in which science, technology and society are mutually constituted. Social inequalities are both built into and perpetuated by science, technology, and engineering. Likewise, science, technology, and engineering shape and are shaped by various societal power relations. This course will provide the analytical tools necessary to understand science, technology, and engineering as fundamentally social enterprises and to understand how they shape society.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Family Law (Formerly 48.305)

Description

Examines some social issues in family law, the changes therein, and the social climate and consequences accompanying these. By using the sociological method of inquiry to examine family law cases, the relationship between law and society as instruments of order and change are exemplified.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Ethnicity in Massachusetts (Formerly 48.310)

Description

Massachusetts is well known for its rich immigrant history and culture. This course examines the social history of and conditions faced by immigrants upon arrival to Massachusetts, the ways they are affected as they settle in communities and their social and cultural impact locally and state-wide. Selected ethnic groups/communities are examined to understand the common processes and experiences as well as differences among them.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociological Perspective on Communication & Social Change (Formerly 48.311)

Description

Most social interactions and interventions involve communication. Thus, communication patterns present critical issues for sociological inquiry. This course introduces communication as a central yet often ignored element of social life. It surveys existing communication theories, then focuses on models used by marginalized populations in efforts to democratize communication systems. Finally, it introduces tools for communication strategizing. As a final product students will conduct a frame analysis of a current social topic. From a general liberal arts perspective, the course will stress critical thinking and writing skills.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Youth and Society (Formerly 48.316)

Description

Youth (or adolescence) constitutes a historically and socially constructed stage of the life course between childhood and adulthood. Since the early twentieth century, society's view of this life period has been ambivalent, at once glorifying the age of youth while also fretting over the problems that youth face. This course takes a sociological view of the study of youth/adolescence with particular attention to: (1) how this stage of the life course intersects with race, gender, immigration status and sexuality; (2) how society has responded to youth over time through a range of youth-serving organizations and media representations; and (3) how youth have responded as agents in their own public representations and development.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Genocide (Formerly 48.317)

Description

The deliberate destruction of an ethnic group is an historical event and a social process. This course addresses such questions as: Why do genocides occur? Why do people become genocide perpetrators? How do genocides affect survivors and their offspring? How can genocide be prevented? Focus is on Native American, Armenian and Jewish experiences and recent cases of ethnic cleansing.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Community Service (Formerly 48.320)

Description

Course uses fieldwork approach to understand social problems and to discipline study and career pursuit in the area of public service.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Social Theory I (Formerly 48.321)

Description

This course offers a critical examination of major classical sociological theories. It emphasizes the relationship between the individual and society and the competing pressures for social order and social conflict.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 48.101 Intro to Sociology, and Sophomore level or higher, and Sociology Majors only or Permission of Instructor.

Social Theory II (Formerly 48.322)

Description

This course offers a critical examination of major contemporary sociological theories, including critical theory, neo-Marxism, critical race theory, feminist theory, and postmodernism.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI 1010 Intro to Sociology and SOCI 3210 Social Theory I.

Global Conflicts (Formerly 48.325)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Fast Food, Hot Planet: Sociological Approaches (Formerly 48.330)

Description

With an eye on climate change sustainability, this course maps the social and historical dimensions of crisis and inequalities of food production and distribution. In addition to exploring food security's relation to sustainable food production, students will strengthen critical thinking, writing, and library research skills.

Sociology of Intimacies and Sexualities

Description

In this course, students will investigate the relationship between society and sexualities, including: social categorizations of sex, gender, and sexuality; social and cultural representations of intimacy and sexuality; and social and institutional control of sexualities and sexual behavior and practice. Students will read theoretical and methodological works from the field of sexualities studies, including sociological, feminist, post-colonial, and queer theorists. By the end of the course, students will be able to articulate a sociological perspective on intimacy and sexualities.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Wealth, Status and Power (Formerly 48.341)

Description

Focuses on the phenomenon of social class distinctions with particular emphasis on social class in America. The approach is both historical and sociological.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Urban Sociology (Formerly 48.345)

Description

Deals with issues related to the quality of life in American cities. Students taking this course may engage in research projects on the city of Lowell and the role of the University of Massachusetts Lowell within that city.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

The Sociology of Health and Health Care (Formerly 48.351)

Description

With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. Health Care system is undergoing a radical change as profound as any in U.S. history including those for minority and woman's rights. A large segment of the population has struggled to obtain even basic health care coverage. The changes taking place are analyzed in a historical and comparative context by examining health care in other countries. Special attention is given to understanding the professions in medicine and the role medical professions have had in shaping medical care. At the micro level, the course examines evolving health care provider/patient relationships to better understand the level of control patients can exert over their health care decisions.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Latinos/as in the United States

Description

By 2060, Latinos are forecast to comprise over 28 percent of the US population. While the presentation of Latinos/as in public discourse often frames them a recently arrived immigrants, Spanish-speaking peoples in the US have a long and rich history. This course focuses a sociological lens on the historical and contemporary experiences of a community whose emergence requires deep analysis. Emphasis is placed on immigration policy, demographic shifts, labor market discrimination and bilingual education.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Black Experience in American Life (Formerly 48.355)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

The Sociology of Religion (Formerly 48.357)

Description

An investigation of religious institutions and experiences. Emphasis is placed on the influence of religion on social change.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Non-Violence (Formerly 48.360)

Description

An analysis of non-violent efforts to achieve social change through demonstrations, civil disobedience, etc. Movements led by Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and others are examined.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Law (Formerly 48.361)

Description

The course examines the role of social forces in defining the law. Topics include the legal profession, white-collar crime, and the importance of race, class and gender in the criminal justice system.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Social Welfare Policy (Formerly 48.362)

Description

The course examines the development of social welfare policy in the United States as well as alternative strategies for social welfare provision. Particular attention is paid to the role of race/ethnicity, class, and gender in the formation of social welfare policy.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Work (Formerly 48.371)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Sociology of Mass Media (Formerly 48.380)

Description

Examines ownership and control patterns of electronic and print media and their impact on media content and censorship.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Research I Quan. Methods (Formerly 48.402)

Description

An introduction to methods of social research, with emphasis on quantitative research methods. Presents basic statistical techniques used in social research as well as the computer software used for analyzing social science data. For majors only.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Research II Qual. Methods (Formerly 48.403)

Description

Qualitative research methods. Discusses various strategies employed by qualitative researchers with special emphasis on field research. For majors only. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Learning from the Field (Formerly 48.404)

Description

Provides students with the opportunity to directly observe and participate in the operation of a social service organization.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Feminist Methodologies (Formerly 48.405)

Description

Despite the recent growth of feminist methodologies, there is no one way of doing feminist methodologies. The growing body of literature in this area addresses the distinctive challenges and strengths of doing this research. Gender Studies scholars especially seek to question the framing of a study, managing of emotions, and ethical dilemmas. We will explore feminist strategies for creating, implementing, and analyzing a project that is grounded in the everyday lives of people while situating them in a social, political, and economic context. We will explore the interdisciplinary intersections where these challenges push at the boundaries of the disciplines of your major field of study. We will also investigate how to use as variety of qualitative approaches while doing a feminist project and the ways in which feminism can enlighten understandings of "traditional" qualitative methods.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Social Policy and Inequalities

Description

This course will prepare students to analyze social policies in the United States and Massachusetts from a sociological perspective by providing them with the relevant historical background, conceptual tools, and research and interpretation skills. The course will identity key features of policy development, implementation and evaluation and interrogate the underlying patterns of inequalities at each stage. The course will analyze historical and contemporary case studies of policies such as those related to poverty and income inequality; affirmative action; education; workforce development and employment; inequalities related to gender and sexualities; immigration; healthcare and disabilities; and families and youth.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Seminar on the Family (Formerly 48.421)

Description

Study of the family structures and gender roles in various human societies. Prerequisites: 48.101 plus either 48.231 or 48.241.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Seminar on Global Society (Formerly 48.469)

Description

Considers the spread of industrial society globally. Emphasizes economic, political and cultural changes in various parts of the world and in the USA.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Seminar on Ethnic Communities (Formerly 48.472)

Description

This course examines a variety of issues, problems and prospects immigrants experience as they attempt to "make it in America". Immigrant America is increasingly ethnically diverse and this course focuses on the factors underlying migration and the ethnic communities migrants settle into with the aim to understand the cultural and contextual basis of their lives, their success and challenges.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Seminar on Conflict Resolution (Formerly 48.475)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Internship I (Formerly 48.484)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Directed Studies in Sociology (Formerly 48.491)

Description

The student, through regular and frequent consultation with an instructor, develops a course of directed reading in sociology and defines a problem for individual research. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Directed Studies: Sociology (Formerly 48.492)

Description

A one-credit, short course available only to qualified seniors. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Thesis in Sociology (Formerly 48.495)

Description

A program of study which affords the advanced student with an additional opportunity to pursue a previously explored problem in greater depth or to initiate a new study. The purpose is to sharpen and refine techniques for scholarly research and presentation in the student's major discipline. Prerequisites: demonstrated proficiency in an area selected for directed study and permission of instructor.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

Practicum Experience (Formerly 48.496)

Description

A program of on-campus and/or off-campus experience for sociology majors and minors only. Specific requirements vary depending upon department policies and the nature of the program undertaken by the student. The intent of the practicum experience is to provide an occasion for investigation of a community, social, cultural, or artistic area and for applying techniques of problem solving and/or skills that are appropriate to the student's major discipline. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Students are graded satisfactory and unsatisfactory. The practicum experiences may not be substituted for a required course in the major. Prerequisite: permission of Chairperson.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.