All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (Formerly 16.100)

Description

This introductory course is designed to expose students to many of the new developments in Electrical Engineering, especially those on-going in the Department. It will also provide information about co-op opportunities and career planning, while also allowing faculty in the Department to describe their courses and answer questions

Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (Formerly 25/16.107)

Description

This course is divided into two parts in which students focus on core skills to help them thrive in electrical and computer engineering. The first half of the course focuses on application programming in Matlab where students learn basics of Programming, Digital Signal Processing, and Data Analysis. In the second part of the course students program a micro-controller and learn about the function of basic electronic components. Students learn to use basic test equipment such as an Oscilloscope, Function Generator, Volt Meter. This course is project and lab based.

Curricula Practical Training

Description

Curricula Practical Training

Circuit Theory I (Formerly 16.201)

Description

Terminal characteristics of ideal elements, active and passive. Ohm's law and Kirchoff's laws. Introduction to network topology, independent variable, loop and nodal analysis with matrix methods. Definition and consequences of linearity. Superposition theorem. Concept of excitation and response. Passive equivalent circuits. Thevenin's and Norton's theorems. Ideal inductance and capacitance, volt-ampere characteristics, energy relations, graphical differentiation and integration. First order transients; initial conditions, natural response, and natural frequencies. Network response to unit step function and unit impulse. Second order transients: RLC circuits, natural frequencies and the complex-frequency s-plane. Pre-Requisite: 92.132 Calculus II with a grade of 'C' or better. Co-Requisite: 16.207 or 16.212 Basic EE Lab

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH 1320 Calculus ll, and ENGN/EECE 1070/1080 Introduction to Engineering l, and Co-req: EECE 2070 Basic Electrical Engineering Lab l, Grade of C or better in MATH 1320.

Circuit Theory II (Formerly 16.202)

Description

Discusses the sinusoidal forcing function, complex numbers, phasors, sinusoidal steady-state conditions, impedance, average real power, reactive power and rms values, exponential forcing function, poles and zeros in the s-plane, concept of the system function and its use in determining the forced response and resonance, reactance cancellation and concept of s-plane vectors. The course also covers Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, superposition, reciprocity, and maximum power in the frequency domain, impedance and admittance. Introduction to matrices and their use in circuit analysis, magnetic coupling, mutual inductance, and ideal transformer. Engineering Science (100%).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: C- or better in EECE 2010 Circuit Theory I; Co-Req: EECE 2080 Basic EE Lab II.

Basic Electrical Engineering Laboratory I (Formerly 16.207)

Description

Experimental work designed to verify theory and to acquaint students with electrical measurement techniques: experiments on meters, bridges, and oscilloscopes. Experiments are correlated with course 16.201 and concern: resistive measurements, Kirchhoff's laws, network theorems, conservation of power and maximum power transfer, inductance and capacitance, and first and second-order transients, operational amplifiers.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: EECE.2010 Circuit Theory I.

Basic Electrical Engineering Lab II (Formerly 16.208)

Description

Presents experimental work designed to emphasize electrical measurement techniques of linear systems with time-varying signals. Waveform measurements with dc and ac meters as well as advanced use of the oscilloscope are also discussed. Experiments are integrated with course 16.202. Experiments cover: Kirchhoff's laws for phasors, bode plots, magnitude and phase measurements of impedance, network theorems, frequency response, resonance, inductance, maximum power transfer, and MATLAB techniques. Engineering Science (50%); Engineering Design (50%).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 2070 Basic EE Lab I; Co-Req: EECE 2020 Circuit Theory II.

Fundamentals of Electricity I (Formerly 16.211/213)

Description

Serves as an introduction to direct current and alternating current analysis of electric circuits, with emphasis on energy and power. Covers design and use of multi-range voltmeters, ammeters, and ohmmeters, the use of bridges and oscilloscopes, phasor analysis of AC circuits, Trigonometric Fourier series, BODE plots, transformers, relays, solenoids, mechanical analogs and magnetic analogs with the application of Fourier and BODE techniques. Students will also be introduced to DC and AC motors and generators, residential circuits, equipment protection, and introduction to digital logic including minimization techniques. Availability and cost of instruments and components is stressed throughout this course. Not for EE majors. Engineering Science (100%).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II with a grade of 'C' or better.

Fundamentals of Electricity Laboratory (Formerly 16.212)

Description

Lab for 16.211 Fundamentals of Electricity. See course description for 16.211. Not for EE majors.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: EECE 2110 Fund of Electricity; Pre-Req: PHYS 1410 Physics I.

Fundamentals of Sound Recording (Formerly 16.214)

Description

Similar to 16.211 but tailored for Sound Recording Technology students only

Prerequisites

Sound Recording Technology majors; Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

ECE Application Programming (Formerly 16.216)

Description

Introduces C programming for engineers. Covers fundamentals of procedural programming with applications in electrical and Computer engineering and embedded systems. Topics include variables, expressions and statements, console input/output, modularization and functions, arrays, pointers and strings algorithms, structures, and file input/output. Introduces working with C at the bit manipulation level. Laboratories include designing and programming engineering applications.

History of Radio (Formerly 16.233)

Description

Intended primarily for students majoring in the liberal arts. The course develops the theory of electricity from an historical perspective. Sufficient background in circuit theory, resonance, field theory and radio waves is given to provide an understanding of the principles of radio from its antecedents in the nineteenth century through the invention of the transistor in the mid twentieth century. The fundamental contributions of, for example Volta, Oersted, Morse, Maxwell, Faraday, Hertz, Lodge, and Marconi are considered. In the present century the technical advances of such figures as de Forest, Fleming, Fessenden, Armstrong and Shockley are studied. The growth, regulation and culture of American broadcasting are also central to the course. Laboratory work is required and students may use this course toward fulfilling the General Education (science/experimental component) requirement of the University. Not open to students in the College of Engineering.

Introduction to Data Communication Networks

Description

This course is designed to convey the essentials of data communication and networking. This includes an understanding of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI), TCP/IP and Internet models. It covers various protocols and architectures of interconnection technologies. Several concepts will be discussed that will enable students to apply the basic concepts of data communication and networking technology in many practical situations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE.1070 Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering, and MATH.1310 Calculus I, and PHYS.1410 Physics I.

Logic Design (Formerly 16.265)

Description

Number systems and binary codes. Boolean algebra. Canonical and fundamental forms of Boolean functions. Function expansion and its applications to digital circuit design. Minimization of Boolean functions by Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps. Two-level and multi-level digital circuits. Decoder, encoders, multiplexers, and de-multiplexers. Latches and flip-flops. Registers and counters. Analysis and synthesis of synchronous sequential circuits. Design of more complex circuits: data-path and control circuits. This course includes a laboratory component in which students apply the design principles learned in lectures to the design of combinational circuits, synchronous sequential circuits, and a serial arithmetic processor.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH 1320 Calculus ll, with a grade of "C" or better, or COMP 1020 Computing ll.

Electronics I Lab (Formerly 16.311)

Description

Laboratory experiments coordinated with the subject matter of 16.365. Characteristics and use of electronic instrumentation for making measurements on electronic circuits. Methods of designing and characterizing diode and transistor circuits. Analysis of performance characteristics of digital and linear semiconductor circuits, including logic elements and amplifiers. Design and construction of circuits using monolithic op amps.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: EECE.3650 Electronics I.

Electronics II Laboratory (Formerly 16.312)

Description

Laboratory experiments coordinated with the subject matter of 16.366. High-frequency characteristics of transistors and transistor amplifiers. Feedback in electronic circuits. Electronic oscillators. Differential amplifiers. Properties of linear IC operational amplifiers and their application in amplifier circuits and waveform generation circuits. Linear circuit design and analysis.

Prerequisites

Co-req: EECE.3660 Electronics ll.

Microprocessors Systems Design I (Formerly 16.317)

Description

Introduction to microprocessors, Uses assembly language to develop a foundation on the hardware which executes a program. Memory and I/O interface design and programming. Design and operation of computer systems. Study of microprocessor and its basic support components, including detailed schematics, timing and functional analysis of their interactions. Laboratories directly related to microprocessor functions and its interfaces (e.g. memory subsystem, I/O devices and coprocessors).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ECE Application Programming, and EECE 2650 Logic Design.

Data Structures (Formerly 16.322)

Description

Covers algorithms and their performance analysis, data structures, abstraction, and encapsulation. Introduces structures and their physical storage representation. Studies stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, graphs, heaps, priority queues, and hashing. Discusses efficient sorting (quicksort and heapsort) and introduces experimental analysis of algorithms as applied to engineering applications. Examines several design issues, including selection of structures based on what operations need to be optimized (insertion, deletion, traversal, searching, sorting, evaluation), encapsulation of algorithms using class and template techniques, and how and when to use recursion (versus explicit stack-based techniques). Laboratories include programming of data structures in C++ and Java applied to Engineering.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.2160 ECE Application Programming

Electromechanics (Formerly 16.355)

Description

Alternating current circuits, three phase circuits, basics of electromagnetic field theory, magnetic circuits, inductance, electromechanical energy conversion. Ideal transformer, iron-core transformer, voltage regulation, efficiency equivalent circuits, and three phase transformers. Induction machine construction, equivalent circuit, torque speed characteristics, and single phase motors. Synchronous machine construction, equivalent circuits, power relationships phasor diagrams, and synchronous motors. Direct current machines construction, types, efficiency, power flow diagram, and external characteristics.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.2020 Circuit Theory II.

Engineering Electromagnetics I (Formerly 16.360)

Description

Waves and Phasors, Transmission lines as Distributed Circuits, Smith Chart Calculations, Impedance Matching, Transients on Transmission Lines, Vector Analysis,Electrostatics and Capacitance, Steady current flow in conductors and Resistance, Magnetostatics and Inductance.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 2020 Circuit Theory II and PHYS 1440 Physics II.

Signals and Systems I (Formerly 16.362)

Description

A study of various continuous voltage/current time functions and their applications to linear time-invariant electrical systems. Review of pertinent topics from 16.202, such as system functions, S-plane concepts and complete responses. Step, ramp and impulse responses of linear circuits. Sifting integrals. Types of analog filter responses. Designs for Butterworth and Chebishev filters. Fourier Analysis, Fourier Transforms, Convolution, Laplace Transforms, Parseval's Theorem. A large portion (30-40%) is devoted to teaching the students communication skills and the use of MATLAB for solving homework problems. A MATLAB based text is assigned to the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 2020 Circuit Theory II and MATH 2360 Eng Differential Equations.

Introduction to Probability and Random Processes (Formerly 16.363)

Description

This course employing probabilistic methods of signal and system analysis (an extension of 16.362) considers the random nature of the world faced by electrical engineers. The course addresses the issues of the nature and characterization of random events, especially noise and its effect on systems. The course is divided into three parts, 1) Introduction to discrete and continuous probability 2) Introduction to statistical methods and 3) random signals and noise and the response of linear systems to random signals. There will be frequent use of Monte-Carlo simulation techniques on the computer to allow students to verify theory and to learn the important technique of simulation. Applications of theory to manufacturing and reliability, noise analysis, spectral analysis, data communication, data collection, and system design will be presented. Prerequisite: 16.362

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II with 'C' or better.

Engineering Mathematics (Formerly 16.364)

Description

Complex number, Argand plane, derivatives of complex numbers, limits and continuity, derivative and Cauchy Riemann conditions, analytic functions, integration in the complex plane, Cauchy's integral formula, infinite series for complex variables. Taylor series, Laurent series, residue theory, evaluation of integrals around indented contours. Linear vector spaces, matrices and determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 2360 Eng Differential Equations.

Electronics I (Formerly 16.365)

Description

A brief introduction to solid-state physics, leading to discussion of physical characteristics of p-n junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors: active, saturated, and cutoff models of bipolar transistors and triode, constant current, and cutoff models of MOSFETs. Circuit models for diodes, and diode applications. Circuit models for transistors, and transistor applications in bipolar and MOS digital circuits and low-frequency amplifier circuits. Analysis of digital circuits and linear circuits based on application of circuit models of devices and circuit theory.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE 2020 Circuit Theory ll, and PHYS 1440 Physics ll, and Co-req: EECE 3110 Electronics l Lab.

Electronics II (Formerly 16.366)

Description

A continuation of 16.365 with discussion of differential amplifiers, operation amplifiers and op amp applications, transistor amplifiers at very high frequencies; direct-coupled and band pass amplifiers; small and large signal amplifiers; feedback amplifiers and oscillators. Active filters, wave form generation circuits including Schmitt trigger, multiplexers, and A/D and D/A converters. Circuit design employing integrated circuit operational amplifiers and discrete devices. Circuit analysis using SPICE. An electronic design project constitutes a major part of the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: C- or better in EECE 3650 Electronics I; Co-Req: EECE 3120 Electronics Lab II.

Capstone Proposal (Formerly 16.399)

Description

This course discusses and presents the non-technical tools and procedures for bringing a potential product from the idea or basic concept stage through final design and to market. Fundamentals of market research, product safety and liability concerns, necessary technical communication skills. Economic concerns, patent, application procedures, design procedures and people skills necessary to be part of an engineering team.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE 3120 Electronics Lab II, EECE 3170 Microprocessors I,and EECE 3660 Electronics II and Senior Level.

Engineering Topics (Formerly 16.400)

Description

This course introduces to the seniors developing the capstone proposal important concepts such as economics, environmental, sustainability, manufacturability, ethical, health, safety ,social and political constraints and how these are related to the overall engineering processes. These will be used as an integral part of their capstone projects.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 16.399 Capstone Proposal.

Microwave Engineering (Formerly 16.403)

Description

An introductory course in the analysis and design of passive microwave circuits beginning with a review of time-varying electromagnetic field concepts and transmission lines. Smith Chart problems; single and double stub matching; impedance transformer design; maximally flat and Chebyshev transformers; microstrip transmission lines, slot lines, coplanar lines; rectangular and circular waveguides; waveguide windows and their use in impedance matching; design of directional couplers; features of weak and strong couplings; microwave filter design; characteristics of low-pass, high-pass, band-pass, band-stop filter designs; two-port network representation of junctions; Z and Y parameters, ABCD parameters, scattering matrix; microwave measurements; measurement of VSWR, complex impedance, dielectric constant, attenuation, and power. A design project constitutes a major part of the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.4610 Emag Theory II.

Directed Studies (Formerly 16.409)

Description

Provides an opportunity for qualified Electrical Engineering students to investigate specific areas of interest. The actual project undertaken may be software or hardware oriented. The most important characteristics of the projects are that the end results represent independent study, that they are research and development oriented, and that they are accomplished in an engineering environment. Design reviews and progress reports are expected for each project. A final formal report to be permanently filed in the EE Department is required for each project. Engineering Design (100%).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3550 Electromechanics,EECE 3600 Emag Theory I, EECE 3620 Signals & Systems I, EECE 3650 Electronics I,and EECE 3660 Electronics II.

Directed Studies (Formerly 16.410)

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for qualified Electrical Engineering students to investigate specific areas of interest. The actual project undertaken may be software or hardware oriented. The most important characteristics of the projects are that the end results represent independent study and that they are research and development oriented, and that they are accomplished in an engineering environment. Design reviews and progress reports are expected for each project. A final formal report to be permanently filed in the EE Department is required for each project.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3550 Electromechanics,EECE 3600 Emag Theory I,EECE 3620 Signals & Systems I,EECE 3650 Electronics I, and EECE 3660 Electronics II.

Medical Diagnostic Imaging (Formerly 16.411)

Description

This course covers the physics and electrical engineering aspects of how signals are acquired from which images will be formed, and the principal methods by which the signals are processed to form useful medical diagnostic images. Modalities studied include: x-rays, ultra-sound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The principles of signal processing via Fourier transform will be reviewed. Noise and other artifacts that degrade the medical diagnostic of images are considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.362 Signals & Systems I.

Directed Studies (Formerly 16.412)

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for qualified Electrical Engineering students to investigate specific areas of interest. The actual project undertaken may be software or hardware oriented. The most important characteristics of the projects are that the end results represent independent study and that they are research and development oriented, and that they are accomplished in an engineering environment. Design reviews and progress reports are expected for each project. A final formal report to be permanently filed in the EE Department is required for each project.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3550 Electromechanics,EECE 3600 Emag Theory I, EECE 3620 Signals & Systems I, EECE 3650 Electronics I,and EECE 3660 Electronics II.

Linear Feedback System (Formerly 16.413)

Description

Concepts of feedback; open loop and closed loop systems. Feedback in electrical and mechanical systems. Mathematical models of systems and linear approximations. Transfer functions of linear systems, block diagrams and signal flow graphs. Sensitivity, control of transient response, disturbance signals. Time domain performance: steady state errors, performance indices. Stability related to s-plane location of the roots of the characteristic equation. Routh-Hurwitz criterion. Graphical analysis techniques: root locus, frequency response as polar plot and Bode diagrams. Closed loop frequency response. A control system design project is included in the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 3620 Signals & Systems I and EECE 3640 Engineering Math.

Integrated Power Systems (Formerly 16.414/514)

Description

Power System Operations and Electricity Markets provide a comprehensive overview to understand and meet the challenges of the new competitive highly deregulated power industry. The course presents new methods for power systems operations in a unified integrated framework combining the business and technical aspects of the restructured power industry. An outlook on power policy models, regulation, reliability, and economics is attentively reviewed. The course lay the groundwork for the coming era of unbundling, open access,, power marketing, self-generation, and regional transmission operations.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.2020 Circuit Theory II.

Wireless Communication (Formerly 16.418)

Description

Cellular systems and design principles, co-channel and adjacent channel interference, mobile radio propagation and determination of large scale path loss, propagation mechanisms like reflection, diffraction and scattering, outdoor propagation models, Okumura and Hata models, small scale fading and multipath, Doppler shift and effects, statistical models for multipath, digital modulation techniques QPSK, DPSK, GMSK, multiple access techniques, TDMA, FDMA, CDMA, spread spectrum techniques, frequency hopped systems, wireless systems and worldwide standards.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE 3600 Engineering Electromagnetics I, and EECE 3620 Signals and Systems l.

Real Time Digital Signal Processing (Formerly 16.421)

Description

This course provides an introduction to real-time digital signal processing techniques using the TMS320C3x floating point and TMS320C5x fixed point processors. The architecture, instruction set and software development tools for these processors will be studied via a series of C and assembly language computer projects where real-time adaptive filters, modems, digital control systems and speech recognition systems are implemented.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.362 Signals & Systems I.

Introduction to Solid State Electronics (Formerly 16.423)

Description

A design of semiconductor device and manufacturing technology is linked to the solid state physics principles in this course. Topics covered: The electronic structure of the atom, wave-particle duality of moving electrons. Schrodinger equation for periodic crystalline structure. Band theory of semiconductors. Brillouin zones. Statistics of electrons and holes. Kinetic effects: electrical conductivity, Hall effect, magnetoresistance. Optical properties: photoconductivity, light absorption and emission. Thermal properties including thermal conductivity, thermo EMF, recombination processes and role of defects.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.365 Electronics I or Instructor permission.

Computational Methods for Power System Analysis (Formerly 16.424/524)

Description

The course explores some of the mathematical and simulation tools used for the design, analysis and operation of electric power systems. Computational methods based on linear and nonlinear optimization algorithms are used to solve load flow problems, to analyze and characterize system faults and contingencies, and to complete economic dispatch of electric power systems. Real case studies and theoretical projects are assigned to implement the techniques learned and to propose recommendations. Different software applications will be used concurrently including ATP, PowerWorld Simulator, Aspen, MatLab with Simulink and Power System Toolbox, PSCAD, etc.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.2020 Circuit Theory II.

Power Systems Stability and Control (Formerly 16.426/526)

Description

Stability definition and cases in power systems. System model for machine angle stability. Small signal and transient stability. Voltage stability phenomenon, its characterization. Small and large signal models for voltage stability analysis. Frequency stability and control. Compensation methods for system voltage regulation including classical and modem methods. Stability of multi-machine system.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.2020 Circuit Theory II.

Advanced VLSI Design Techniques (Formerly 16.427/527)

Description

This course builds on the previous experience with Cadence design tools and covers advanced VLSI design techniques for low power circuits. Topics covered include aspects of the design of low voltage and low power circuits including process technology, device modeling, CMOS circuit design, memory circuits and subsystem design. This will be a research-oriented course based on team projects.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 4690/502 VLSI Design, or Instructor permission.

Alternative Energy Sources (Formerly 16.428)

Description

PV conversion, cell efficiency, cell response, systems and applications. Wind Energy conversion systems: Wind and its characteristics; aerodynamic theory of windmills; wind turbines and generators; wind farms; siting of windmills. Other alternative energy sources: Tidal energy, wave energy, ocean thermal energy conversion, geothermal energy, solar thermal power, satellite power, biofuels. Energy storage: Batteries, fuel cells, hydro pump storage, flywheels, compressed air.

Electric Vehicle Technology (Formerly 16.429)

Description

Electric vehicle VS internal combustion engine vehicle. Electric vehicle (EV) saves the environment. EV design, EV motors, EV batteries, EV battery chargers and charging algorithms, EV instrumentation and EV wiring diagram. Hybrid electric vehicles. Fuel cells. Fuel cell electric vehicles. The course includes independent work.

R F Design (Formerly 16.431)

Description

Two-port network parameters, Smith chart applications for impedance matching, transmission line structures like stripline, microstrip line and coaxial line, filter designs for low-pass, high-pass and band-pass characteristics, amplifier design based on s-parameters, bias network designs, one port and two port oscillator circuits, noise in RF systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.3600 Emag Theory I.

Electronic Materials (Formerly 16.333/EECE.3330)

Description

The production and processing of materials into finished products constitute a large part of the present economy. To prepare students for the use of a variety of traditional and new materials, this course will cover: atomic structure and chemical bonding, crystal geometry and defects, mechanical properties and phase diagrams of metals and alloys, electrrical and optical properties of semiconductors, ceramics, and polymers; brief description of electronic, quantum electronic and photonic devices; benefits and difficulties of materials design with decreasing dimensions from millimeters to micrometers and to nanometers.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH.1320 Calculus II and PHYS.1440 Physics II.

Computational Electromagnetics (Formerly 16.435)

Description

Formulation of electromagnetic problems for computer solution. Variational principles in electromagnetics. Method of moments. Applications in electrostatics, wire antennas, waveguides and cavities. Simple scattering problems. Finite difference methods. Finite element method.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.461 Emag Theory II.

Introduction to Biosensors (Formerly 16.441/541)

Description

This course introduces the theory and design of biosensors and their applications for pathology, pharmacogenetics, public health, food safety civil defense, and environmental monitoring. Optical, electrochemical and mechanical sensing techniques will be discussed.

Power Distribution System (Formerly 16.444)

Description

An intermediate course in analysis and operation of electrical power distribution systems using applied calculus and matrix algebra. Topics include electrical loads characteristics, modeling , metering, customer billing, voltage regulation, voltage levels, and power factor correction. The design and operation of the power distribution system components will be introduced: distribution transformers, distribution substation, distribution networks, and distribution equipment. Prerequisite: 16.355

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.355 Electromechanics.

Analog Devices and Techniques (Formerly 16.445/565)

Description

A survey of analog devices and techniques, concentrating on operational amplifier design and applications. Operational amplifier design is studied to reveal the limitations of real opamps, and to develop a basis for interpreting their specifications. Representative applications are covered, including: simple amplifiers, differential and instrumentation amplifiers, summers, integrators, active filters, nonlinear circuits, and waveform generation circuits. A design project is required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.366 Electronics II.

Advanced Digital System Design (Formerly 16.450)

Description

Design of logic machines. Finite state machines, gate array designs, ALU and 4 bit CPU unit designs, micro-programmed systems. Hardware design of advanced digital circuits using XILINX. Application of probability and statistics for hardware performance, and upgrading hardware systems. Laboratories incorporate specification, top-down design, modeling, implementation and testing of actual advanced digital design systems hardware. Laboratories also include simulation of circuits using VHDL before actual hardware implementation and PLDs programming.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE 2650 Logic Design, EECE 3660 Electronics II, EECE 3120 Electronics II Lab, and EECE 3170 Microprocessor Systems Design I, or permission of Instructor.

Software Engineering (Formerly 16.453)

Description

Introduces software life cycle models, and engineering methods for software design and development. Design and implementation, testing, and maintenance of large software packages in a dynamic environment, and systematic approach to software design with emphasis on portability and ease of modification. Laboratories include a project where some of the software engineering methods (from modeling to testing) are applied in an engineering example.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE 2160 Dig Control Programming and EECE 3220 Data Structures. or Permission of Instructor.

Introduction to Nanoelectronics (Formerly 16.459/559)

Description

This course introduces the use of nanomaterials for electronic devices such as sensors and transistors. Synthesis methods for nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, and 2-D materials such as graphene will be covered. The challenges in incorporating nanomaterials into devices will also be discussed. These methods will be compared to techniques used in the semiconductor industry and what challenges, technically and financially, exist for their widespread adoption will be addressed. Finally, examples of devices that use nanomaterials will be reviewed. The course will have some hands on demonstrations.

Biomedical Instrumentation (Formerly 16.460/560)

Description

A survey of biomedical instrumentation that leads to the analysis of various medical system designs and the related factors involved in medical device innovation. In addition to the technical aspects of system integration of biosensors and physiological transducers there will be coverage of a biodesign innovation process that can translate clinical needs into designs. A significant course component will be project-based prototyping of mobile heath applications. The overall goals of the course are to provide the theoretical background as well as specific requirements for medical device development along with some practical project experience that would thereby enable students to design electrical and computer based medical systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ECE senior/grad or BMEBT student

Engineering Electromagnetics II (Formerly 16.461)

Description

Continuation of Magnetostatics, Maxwell's Equations for Time-varying Fields, plane waves: time-harmonic fields, polarization, current flow in good conductors and skin effect, power density and Poynting vector, wave reflection and transmission; Snell's Law, fiber optics, Brewster angle, radiation and simple antennas, electromagnetic concepts involved in a topical technology in development.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.3600 Emag Theory I.

Antenna Theory and Design (Formerly 16.462)

Description

An introduction to properties of individual antennas and arrays of antennas. Retarded potentials, dipoles of arbitrary length, radiation pattern, gain, directivity, radiation resistance. The loop antenna. Effects of the earth. Reciprocity, receiving antennas, effective length and area. Moment methods. Arrays: collinear, broadside, endfire. Array synthesis. Mutual coupling. Log-periodic and Yagi arrays. Radiation from apertures: the waveguide horn antenna, parabolic dish. Antenna noise temperature. Numerical software packages. A design project is required in the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.4610 Emag Theory II.

Special Topics (Formerly 16.467)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Electro-optics & Integrated Optics (Formerly 16.468)

Description

An introduction to physical optics, electro-optics and integrated optics. Topics include: Waves and polarization, optical resonators, optical waveguides, coupling between waveguides, electro-optical properties of crystals, electro-optic modulators, Micro-Optical-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS) Devices and photonic and microwave wireless systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.3600 Emag Theory I.

VLSI Design (Formerly 16.469/502)

Description

Introduction to CMOS circuits including transmission gate, inverter, NAND, NOR gates, MUXEs, latches and registers. MOS transistor theory including threshold voltage and design equations. CMOS inverter's DC and AC characteristics along with noise margins. Circuit characterization and performance estimation including resistance, capacitance, routing capacitance, multiple conductor capacitance, distributed RC capacitance, multiple conductor capacitance, distributed RC capacitance, switching characteristics incorporating analytic delay models, transistor sizing and power dissipation. CMOS circuit and logic design including fan-in, fan-out, gate delays, logic gate layout incorporating standard cell design, gate array layout, and single as well as two-phase clocking. CMOS test methodologies including stuck-at-0, stuck-at-1, fault models, fault coverage, ATPG, fault grading and simulation including scan-based and self test techniques with signature analysis. A project of modest complexity would be designed to be fabricated at MOSIS.

VLSI Fabrication (Formerly 16.470)

Description

Fabrication of resistors, capacitors, p-n junction and Schottky barrier diodes, BJT's and MOS devices and integrated circuits. Topics include: silicon structure, wafer preparation, sequential techniques in microelectronic processing, testing and packaging, yield and clean room environments. MOS structures, crystal defects, Fick's laws of diffusion; oxidation of silicon, photolithography including photoresist, development and stripping. Metallization for conductors, Ion implantation for depletion mode and CMOS transistors for better yield speed, low power dissipation and reliability. Students will fabricate circuits using the DSIPL Laboratory.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.365 Electronics I.

Embedded Real Time Systems (Formerly 16.472)

Description

Designing embedded real-time computer systems. Types of real-time systems, including foreground/background, non-preemptive multitasking, and priority-based pre-emptive multitasking systems. Soft vs. hard real time systems. Task scheduling algorithms and deterministic behavior. Ask synchronization: semaphores, mailboxes and message queues. Robust memory management schemes. Application and design of a real-time kernel. A project is required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE.2160 ECE Application Programming,EECE.3170 Microprocessor Sys Desgn I, EECE.3220 Data Structures.

Power Electronics (Formerly 16.473/515)

Description

A one-semester course with emphasis on the engineering design and performance analysis of power electronics converters. Topics include: power electronics devices (power MOSFETs, power transistors, diodes, silicon controlled rectifiers SCRs, TRIACs, DIACs and Power Darlington Transistors), rectifiers, inverters, ac voltage controllers, dc choppers, cycloconverters, and power supplies. The course includes a project, which requires that the student design and build one of the power electronics converters. A demonstrative laboratory to expose the students to all kinds of projects is part of the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3550 Electromechanics and EECE 3660 Electronics II.

Principles Of Solid State Devices (Formerly 16.474)

Description

Principles of Solid State Devices: Crystal properties and growth of semi-conductors, atoms and electrons, Bohr's model, quantum mechanics, bonding forces and energy bands in solids, charge carriers in semiconductors, drift of carriers in electric and magnetic fields, carrier lifetime and photoconductivity, junctions, forward and reverse bias, reverse bias breakdown (Zener effect), tunnel diodes, photodiodes, LED, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors. A design project is included in the course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 16.365 Electronics I.

Microprocessor Systems II & Embedded Systems (Formerly 16.480)

Description

Continuation of 16.317. CPU architecture, memory interfaces and management, coprocessor interfaces, bus concepts, bus arbitration techniques, serial I/O devices, DMA, interrupt control devices. Including Design, construction, and testing of dedicated microprocessor systems (static and real-time). Hardware limitations of the single-chip system. Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3110 Electronics I Lab, EECE 3170 Microprocessor Sys Desgn I, and EECE 3650 Electronics I.

Operating Systems (Formerly 16.481)

Description

Covers the components, design, implementation, and internal operations of computer operating systems. Topics include basic structure of operating systems, Kernel, user interface, I/O device management, device drivers, process environment, concurrent processes and synchronization, inter-process communication, process scheduling, memory management, deadlock management and resolution, and file system structures. laboratories include examples of components design of a real operating systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE.2160 ECE Application Programming,EECE.3170 Microprocessor Sys Desgn I, EECE.3220 Data Structures.

Computer Architecture and Design (Formerly 16.482)

Description

Structure of computers, past and present: first, second, third and fourth generation. Combinatorial and sequential circuits. Programmable logic arrays. Processor design: information formats, instruction formats, arithmetic operations and parallel processing. Hardwired and microprogrammed control units. Virtual, sequential and cache memories. Input-output systems, communication and bus control. Multiple CPU systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3170 Microprocessor Sys Desgn I,EECE 2650 Intro Logic Design.

Network Design: Principles, Protocols & Applications (Formerly 16.483)

Description

Covers design and implementation of network software that transforms raw hardware into a richly functional communication system. Real networks (such as the Internet, ATM, Ethernet, Token Ring) will be used as examples. Presents the different harmonizing functions needed for the interconnection of many heterogeneous computer networks. Internet protocols, such as UDP, TCP, IP, ARP, BGP and IGMP, are used as examples to demonstrate how internetworking is realized. Applications such as electronic mail and the WWW are studied.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE.3220 Data Structures.

Computer Vision and Digital Image Processing (Formerly 16.484)

Description

Introduces the principles and the fundamental techniques for Image Processing and Computer Vision. Topics include programming aspects of vision, image formation and representation, multi-scale analysis, boundary detection, texture analysis, shape from shading, object modeling, stereo-vision, motion and optical flow, shape description and objects recognition (classification), and hardware design of video cards. AI techniques for Computer Vision are also covered. Laboratories include real applications from industry and the latest research areas.

Prerequisites

Pre-req; EECE 2160 ECE Application Programming, and EECE 3620 Signals and Systems or Permission of Instructor.

Computer Aided Engineering I Lab (Formerly 16.485)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Fiber Optic Communication (Formerly 16.490)

Description

Optical fiber; waveguide modes, multimode vs single mode; bandwidth and data rates; fiber losses; splices, couplers, connectors, taps and gratings; optical transmitters; optical receivers; high speed optoelectronic devices; optical link design; broadband switching; single wavelength systems (FDDI, SONET, ATM); coherent transmission; wavelength division multiplexing and CDMA; fiber amplifiers.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: EECE 3600 Emag Theory I, EECE 3620 Signals & Systems I or Instructor permission.

Industrial Experience (Formerly 16.491)

Description

This three credit course is for co-op or industrial experience. It may be taken three times and the co-op internship should be for at least 500 hours in order to be eligible for credit. Only 3 credits may be used toward the BSEng in CpE or EE degree. Registration for this course is conditional on the approval of the Department Co-op coordinator. A grade of Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory is given.

Industrial Experience II (Formerly 16.492)

Description

Industrial work experience by permission of coordinator only.

Industrial Experience III (Formerly 16.493)

Description

This three credit course is for co-op or industrial experience. It may be taken three times and the co-op internship should be for at least 500 hours in order to be eligible for credit. Only 3 credits may be used toward the BSEng in CpE or EE degree. Registration for this course is conditional on the approval of the Department Co-op coordinator. A grade of Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory is given. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

Capstone Project (Formerly 16.499)

Description

The purpose of the Capstone Project is to provide the student with a design experience which resembles entry level engineering assignments. It is expected that the project encompass a minimum of three technical areas within the CpE or EE discipline, and include some aspects of each step in the development of a marketable product i.e. Research, Design & Development, Manufacture, Marketing & Service. A formal technical report must be submitted prior to the submission of a course grade. Prerequisite 16.399 and 16.400

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: EECE.3990Capstone Proposal.