All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Principles of Biology I (Formerly 81.111)

Description

Introduces topics such as the chemical and physical basis of life, its evolution, diversity, distribution, and interrelationships of life forms. The central theme of genetic replication, translation, expression, and selection will be emphasized as a unifying principle which determines and integrates structure and function at the cellular, individual population, and community levels of organization. Designed for those students who intend to pursue career options in the biological sciences, biotechnology or related areas such as medicine, biomedical research, radiological sciences or environmental sciences. It is the first-semester course of a two-semester sequence.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: BIOL.1170L Experimental Biology I and Anti-Req: BIOL.1220 and BIOL.2100 and LIFE.1000 and LIFE.1010.

Principles of Biology II (Formerly 81.112)

Description

Serves as a continuation of the 81.111/81.112 sequence for those students who intend to pursue career options in the biological sciences or related professional areas such as medicine, biomedical research or environmental sciences. Molecular energy exchange in organisms (photosynthesis and respiratory metabolism), the common functional needs of support, locomotion, nutrition, internal communication and the maintenance of homeostasis are considered. Control and regulation of organisms at levels beyond the individual are considered through discussions of population and community ecology.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: BIOL.1180L Experimental Biology II.

Freshman Seminar in Biology (Formerly 81.116)

Description

This course is designed to acclimate incoming students to their new University environment. Students will learn about the Biology program, its faculty and staff members, University resources, and other information useful for success.

Experimental Biology I (Formerly 81.117)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: BIOL.1110 Principles of Biology I.

Experimental Biology II (Formerly 81.118)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Biology for Health Sciences (Formerly 81.122)

Description

Develops a basic understanding of biological topics relevant to students in the health sciences. Course will introduce students to biochemistry, cell biology, cellular respiration, cell replication, genetics, inheritance and molecular biology. Introduction to prions, viruses, prokaryotic and eukaryotic biology will also be covered.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.1240 Biology for Health Sciences Lab, and Exercise Physiology Majors Only; Anti-Req: BIOL.1110 and BIOL.2100 and LIFE.1000 and LIFE.1010.

Biology for Health Sciences Lab (Formerly 81.124)

Description

Develops a basic understanding of biological topics relevant to students in the health sciences. Course will introduce students to biochemistry, cell biology, cellular respiration, cell replication, genetics, inheritance and molecular biology, Introduction to prions, viruses, prokayotic and eukaryotic biology will also be covered.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: BIOL.1220 Biology for Health Sciences.

Curricula Practical Training

Description

Curricula Practical Training

General Microbiology (Formerly 81.201)

Description

A study of the general properties of bacteria and viruses (anatomy, physiology, genetics,metabolism, cultivation, and growth); discussions include major microbial infections in man (etiologic agent, antibiotics and chemotherapy) and an examination of the role of the microbes in the environment.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, BIOL 1120 Principles of Biology II.

General Microbiology Laboratory (Formerly 81.203)

Description

A series of laboratory exercises covering basic qualitative and quantitative techniques commonly employed in a microbiology laboratory.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.201 General Microbiology.

Biology for Engineers (Formerly 81.210)

Description

Develops a basic understanding of the science of biology for engineering students, including and introduction to biochemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, genomics, molecular biology, cell growth, and nutrition. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic biology will be covered.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.2120L Biology for Engineers Lab. Anit-Req: BIOL.1110 and BIOL.1220 and LIFE.1000 and LIFE.1010.

Biology for Engineers Laboratory (Formerly 81.212)

Description

This laboratory course will build on BIOL.2100. It will provide an introduction to several basic biological techniques and approaches used in biological engineering laboratories.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.2100 Biology for Engineers.

Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology (Formerly 81.220)

Description

This course will cove basic topics in cell and molecular biology, including structures of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids, structure of DNA and it replication and repair, transcription, and cell-cell communication. The molecular biology of cells and the regulation of cellular processes will be emphasized.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: C- or better in BIOL-1110 Principles of Biology l.

Experimental Methods in Biology (Formerly 81.233)

Description

This is a project-based course designed to introduce students to the methods of general biological laboratory research. Techniques will be introduced in the context of interrelated experiments during a semester-long project. Techniques will include, but are not limited to: making solutions, pipetting, using sterile technique, gel electrophoresis, DNA transformations, minipreps, and other molecular and microscopic methods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 1170L Experimental Biology I and BIOL 1180L Experimental Biology II.

Genetics (Formerly 81.235)

Description

The theories of both classical and molecular genetics are explored with emphasis on the experimental evidence which has laid the foundation for contemporary understanding of genetics, included is the nature of the genetic material, gene action, genetic recombination, gene regulation, gene interaction, the production and inheritance of genetic phenotypes, chromosomal mechanics, and the behavior of genes in populations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: C- or better in BIOL-1110 Principles of Biology l, and Co-req: BIOL.2370 Problems in Genetics.

Problems in Genetics (Formerly 81.237)

Description

Techniques of genetic analysis using molecular, prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. There is an emphasis on problem solving and statistical methods.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.235 Genetics

Evolution, Ecology and Conservation (Formerly 81.240)

Description

Over 5 million species thrive in amazingly diverse habitats on Earth ranging from the extreme freezing cold of the poles to the lush warmth of the tropics. How did this fantastic diversity arise on our earth? How are these species intimately interconnected with one another, their communities and their ecosystem? How can we save this remarkable biodiversity from extinction? This course will address these key questions by examining the fundamental concepts of evolution, ecology and conservation biology. Students will be expected to attend a discussion section in which they will examine case studies and primary scientific literature.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: C- or better in both BIOL.1110 Principles of Biology l, and BIOL.1120 Principles of Biology ll.

Physiology (Formerly 81.252)

Description

Presents a comprehensive study of the fundamental mechanisms governing mammalian physiology. The role of cell physiology in determining systemic functions and coordinating biological control systems will be emphasized. Maintenance of homeostasis will be discussed in terms of biochemical, cytological, anatomical, and physical principles.

Directed Research Experience II (Formerly 81.300)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Microbiology (Formerly 81.301)

Description

General properties of bacteria and viruses including anatomy, physiology, genetics, metabolism, cultivation, growth, control and their role in the ecosystems, and industry.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL.1110/1120 Principles of Biology I & II and CHEM.1210 Chemistry I or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II or CHEM.1350 Honors Chemistry.

Microbiology Laboratory (Formerly 81.303)

Description

A series of laboratory exercises covering basic qualitative and quantitative techniques commonly employed in a microbiology laboratory including sterile technique, microscopy, enrichment and isolation, and prevention.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.301 Microbiology

Introduction to Bioinformatics

Description

An introduction to the field of bioinformatics with some hands-on exploration of applications. Specific areas include scientific archives and information retrieval, genome organization, comparative genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, structural bioinformatics, and systems biology. This course also imparts basic computational skills in data retrieval form the databases in molecular and structural biology.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, BIOL 1120 Principles of Biology II.

Introduction to Bioinformatics

Description

An introduction to the field of bioinformatics with some hands-on exploration of applications. Specific areas include scientific archives and information retrieval, genome organization, comparative genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, structural bioinformatics, and systems biology. This course also imparts basic computational skills in data retrieval from the databases in molecular and structural biology.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, BIOL 1120 Principles of Biology II.

Invertebrate Zoology (Formerly 81.306)

Description

A survey of the phyla of invertebrate animals. Discussions include their physiology, development, morphology, behavior, ecology and adaptations. Corequisite: 81.308

Invertebrate Zoology Lab (Formerly 81.308)

Description

A broad spectrum of living and preserved specimens are studied in the laboratory with regard to both structure and function. Corequisite 81.306

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.3060 Invertebrate Zoology.

Principles of Ecology (Formerly 81.315)

Description

A series of lectures concerned with the interrelationships of organisms with their abiotic environment with emphasis on the New England area. Selected current topics will supplement the text.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.112 Principles of Biology II.

Principles of Ecology Laboratory (Formerly 81.317)

Description

A series of laboratory exercises to supplement and illustrate lectures of 81.315. Field trips are an integral part of the course involving sampling and analysis of such ecosystem components as water, soil, invertebrate fauna and characteristic flora of various habitats. Directed readings, quizzes, practical exam and oral presentation of a research topic are integral parts of the course.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.315 Principles of Ecology.

Botany (Formerly 81.320)

Description

Serves as an introduction to the study of the plant kingdom dealing with the structure, function, and diversity of plants with an emphasis on seed plants. The physiology, morphology, and taxonomy of plants is emphasized.

Botany Laboratory (Formerly 81.322)

Description

Emphasizes material covered in 81.320 using field and laboratory exercises.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.320 Botany.

Economic Botany (Formerly 81.324)

Description

Discussions on how humans use plants. Topics will include: Structure and characteristics of woods and their uses in construction of various items, agricultural uses of food plants and spices, poisonous plants, medicinal plants, plants used in religious ritual and plants used as hallucinogens, plants that have altered human history.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, or LIFE 1010 Life Science I.

Comp Vertebrate Anatomy (Formerly 81.342)

Description

This course is designed to provide students a broad understanding of the anatomy of vertebrates with an emphasis on comparison between taxa and their evolutionary significance. Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of anatomical structure and terminology of vertebrates and an understanding of how these structures have evolved from ancestral forms. There will also be some reference to the fields of embryology, histology and paleontology in the course. This course may interest students who might want to go into various animal/human focused fields (e.g. veterinary science, medicine or graduate studies with more organismal focus), and students who simply want a course focused on vertebrates. However, students should note that this course does not focus on human nor veterinary anatomy.This course could also help undergraduates in the General Biology and Ecology Option satisfy free elective requirements.

Comp Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory (Formerly 81.344)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.342 Comp Vertebrate Anatomy.

Development and Evolution

Description

This course will introduce the concepts and methods of the field of evolutionary developmental biology. We will cover gene regulation and evolution. Through primary literature, discussion and presentation, we will explore how genetic changes to developmental processes contribute to evolutionary change.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2200 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology, and BIOL.2400 Evolution, Ecology and Conservation.

Supervised Teaching Biology I (Formerly 81.401)

Description

Through observation, preparation of material and presentation of demonstrations in selected courses offered by the Department of Biological Sciences, the student becomes familiar with the materials and teaching/learning situations in biology.

Supervised Teaching Biology II (Formerly 81.402)

Description

Through observation, preparation of material and presentation of demonstrations in selected courses offered by the Department of Biological Sciences, the student becomes familiar with the materials and teaching/learning situations in biology.

Bioinformatics

Description

Lectures cover the biological and computational basis of approaches to sequence alignment, gene detection, protein structure prediction, phylogenetic inference, analysis of microarray gene expression data, gene mapping and comparative genomics. permission of instructor.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2350 Genetics, and Co-req: BIOL.4070 Bioinformatics Lab.

Environment Microbiology Laboratory (Formerly 81.406)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.404 Enviromental Microbiolgy.

Bioinformatics Laboratory

Description

Computer-based exercises and independent projects designed to showcase the capabilities and limitations of available computational tools used in genome research.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.4050 Bioinformatics.

Photobiology (Formerly 81.409)

Description

Biological process involving light in plants and animals. Topics include mechanisms of light absorption, energy transduction, light reactions in photosynthesis, functions of color in flowering plants, visual systems and structural and pigment coloration in animals, pigmentation in animals affecting camouflage and reproductive strategies. In addition, the genetics involved in responses to light such as photoperiods, cicardian rhythms, and seasonal cycles will be covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BIOL.4190 Biochemistry.

Senior Research Biology (Formerly 81.411)

Description

An individual, directed one-year research program for senior biology majors selected on the basis of previous academic performance at the end of the junior year. A topic will be chosen after consultation with a faculty member. A report of the research in the form of a thesis is required.

Senior Research: Biology (Formerly 81.412)

Description

An individual, directed one-year research program for senior biology majors selected on the basis of previous academic performance at the end of the junior year. A topic will be chosen after consultation with a faculty member. A report of the research in the form of a thesis is required.

Invertebrate Zoology II (Formerly 81.413)

Description

An in depth exploration of the deutorostome phyla with a focus on anatomy, ecology and evolution of the lophophorates, Echinodermata, Chaetognatha, Hemichordata and Chordata. Includes readings from the primary literature.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: BIOL 4150L Invertebrate Zoology Lab II; Pre-Req: BIOL 3060 Invertebrate Zoology.

Invertebrate Zoology Lab II (Formerly 81.415)

Description

The laboratory study of live and preserved specimens of invertebrate animals with a focus on anatomy and functional morphology.

Prerequisites

Co-Req; BIOL 4130 Invertebrate Zoology II, Pre-Req: BIOL 3080L Invertebrate Zoology Lab.

Biochemistry (Formerly 81.419)

Description

Studies the structure and properties of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids which combined with a discussion of elementary enzymology allows for detailed descriptions of several important degradative and biosynthetic pathways, their integration and regulation. Throughout the course, emphasis is on methods and practical application of fundamental information to the solution of problems of current biomedical interest.

Prerequisites

Pre-req CHEM 2220 Organic Chemistry II or CHEM 2230 Organic Chemistry IIB and BIOL 2200 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology or BIOL 2350 Genetics or BIOL 2120L Biology for Engineers.

Biochemistry II (Formerly 81.420)

Description

This course will focus on protein dynamics where students will gain facility with thermodynamics of protein folding/misfolding, catalysis, kinetics and binding equilibria as they apply to proteins and other molecules in biological systems. The central theme of this course is that living systems can be understood in terms of the fundamental principles defining the structure and energetics of biological molecules. Attention will be given to quantitative aspects of enzyme kinetics and molecular binding. Examples of how these principles apply to the understanding and treatment of human disease will be discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.419 Biochemistry.

Biochemistry Techniques (Formerly 81.421)

Description

A series of discussions and "hands on" laboratory exercises emphasizing techniques and use of equipment most commonly employed in biochemicaI-biomedicaI research laboratories. Techniques to be mastered include: cell culture, cell fractionation, enzyme purification, ultracentrifugation, UV-visible spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, various types of chromatography (thin layer, gas, gel exclusion, ion exchange), electrophoresis, liquid scintillation spectrometry, and the safe handling and application of radioisotopes to problems in biochemistry. Wherever possible, the principles presented in 81.419 will be used as a basis for experimentation using the above techniques. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM.2300L Organic Chem Lab IIB, or CHEM.2280L Organic Chem Lab IIA, and BIOL.2330L Experimental Methods in Biology.

Biology of Global Change (Formerly 81.423)

Description

An examination of the role of life processes in controlling the cycling of elements on the surface of the Earth and atmosphere from the molecular to the global level. Students will learn how the different physical components of Earth interact, how these interactions are influenced by life, and how they affect Earth's habitability now and in the future.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.112 Principles of Biology II.

Evolutionary Biology (Formerly 81.426)

Description

Examines the patterns and processes of biological evolution that have led to the diversity of life. Topics covered include the history of evolutionary thought, the evidence for evolution, the generation and maintenance of population-level variation, natural selection, adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, phylogenetics, molecular evolution, the fossil record and extinctions. In addition to lecture and textbook material, students will read and discuss classic and contemporary primary literature from evolutionary biology.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, BIOL 1120 Principles of Biology II.

Molecular Biotechnology: Recombinant Protein Production (Formerly 81.428)

Description

Proteins are major targets of pharmaceuticals, and are themselves increasingly used as therapeuticals. However both basic research and the pharmaceutical industry depends on availability of purified proteins that are often difficult to isolate from native sources. In this lecture course, students will learn basic and advanced theoretical background in expression and purification of recombinant proteins. It will cover a variety of expression systems including prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The course will also address traditional and new methods in recombinant protein purification. Furthermore, students will be introduced to some downstream applications such as crystallization screens and biochemical/biophysical studies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 81.111 Principles of Biology I.

Recombinant Protein Production Techniques (Formerly 81.429 & 81.529)

Description

This course introduces students to the principles and practice of recombinant protein expression and purification's. Proteins are major targets of pharmaceuticals, and are themselves increasingly used as therapeuticals. However both basic research and pharmaceutical industry depends on availability of purified proteins that are often difficult to isolate from native sources. This course will provide both didactic and laboratory instruction. It is comprised of a series of lecture and laboratory exercises, with an emphasis on practical techniques and hands-on experience of recombinant protein purification. The course will cover a variety of expression systems, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and address traditional and new methods in protein purification.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2330L Experimental Methods in Biology, or BIOL 4210L Biochemistry Techniques.

Genomics (Formerly 81.432)

Description

This course surveys the field of genomics, examining current technologies and their biological applications. Lectures cover genome organization, genome sequencing and annotation, functional genomics, evolutionary genomics, transcriptomics. proteomics and the role of bioinformatics in organizing and interpreting genomic data.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2350 Genetics and Co-req: BIOL 4340L Genomics Laboratory.

Genomics Laboratory (Formerly 81.434)

Description

A series of molecular laboratory and computer-based bioinformatics exercises providing practical experience in the collection and analysis of genomic-level data.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2350 Genetics and Co-req: BIOL 4320 Genomics.

Biology and Evolution of Arthropoda (Formerly 81.437)

Description

A detailed examination of phylum Arthropoda from developmental, ecological, genetic, morphological and paleontological perspectives. Specific topics include the relationships of arthropods to protoarthropod-like groups including tardigrades and onychophorans, the evolution of segmentation, and current perspectives on relationships within the phylum.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 3060 Invertebrate Zoology; BIOL 3080L Invertebrate Zoology Lab; BIOL 4260 Evolutionary Biology and Co- req: BIOL 5390L Biology and Evolution of Arthropoda Lab.

Biology and Evolution of Arthropoda Laboratory (Formerly 81.439)

Description

An exploration of protoarthropod and arthropod diversity using live and preserved specimens of the major taxa including Tardigrada, Onychophora, Chelicerata, Crustacea, Myriapoda and Hexapoda. Students will learn to collect, dissect, identify, handle and care for live specimens.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 3060 Invertebrate Zoology; BIOL 3080L Invertebrate Zoology Lab, BIOL 4260 Evolutionary Biology and Co-req: BIOL 5370 Biology and Evolution of Arthropoda.

Advances in Plant Biology (Formerly 81.440)

Description

Examination of a range of topics in plant biology with an emphasis on processes that are unique to plants. The course will focus first on the role of plants in human affairs, and basic plant anatomy, physiology and genetics followed by three or more topics at an advanced level. Typical focus areas may include biosynthesis and regulation of fatty acids, metabolism of aromatic amino acids, studies of pathways leading to the synthesis of useful natural plant products and the genetic manipulation of plants to promote plant improvement.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2350 Genetics and BIOL.4190 Biochemistry I.

Cell Biology (Formerly 81.442)

Description

This course uses the information learned in prerequisite course to cover advanced details in specific areas of cell biology. The course will introduce students to the internal and external dynamics of eukaryotic cells. Students are familiarized with cellular including membrane structure and function, cell adhesion, intercellular communication, signal transduction, the cytoskeleton, chemotaxis, receptor-mediated endocytosis and intracellular trafficking with an eye towards understanding their role in various diseases. Throughout the course, students will also learn about the various methods and experimentation used by researchers including molecular genetics, immunolocalization, pharmacological intervention and intracellular protein localization. Three one-hour lectures.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2350 Genetics, and BIOL.2200 Principles of Cell & Molecular Biology.

Senior Seminar in Biology (Formerly 81.451)

Description

This course instructs students in developing effective writing and speaking skills required for preparation of scientific manuscripts and presentations, and communicating in the scientific world. Students will be required to prepare and present oral presentations and to submit written reports.

Senior Seminar II (Formerly 81.452)

Description

Seminar discussion of selected topics of current research interest. An oral seminar presentation as well as a written report are required of all biology seniors.

Metazoan Parasitology (Formerly 81.457)

Description

An introduction to the diversity of metazoans (animals) that parasitize humans, livestock, other animals (both vertebrate and invertebrate), and plants. Lectures emphasize the morphology, form and function, physiology, systematics, evolution, life cycles and pathogenesis of several major parasitic groups. Formerly: Advanced Invertebrate Zoology.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BIOL 3060 Invertebrate Zoology; Co-Req: BIOL 4590L Metazoan Parasitology Laboratory.

Metazoan Parasitology Laboratory (Formerly 81.459)

Description

The purpose of the laboratory is to provide students an opportunity to identify and work with a variety of parasites that we discuss in lecture. We will work with preserved specimens, slide material, necropsies, and live specimens. Students will learn how to identify parasites and understand how they affect host biology.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.4570 Metazoan Parasitology.

Stem Cell Biology (Formerly 81.460)

Description

The molecular and genetic characteristics of stem cells and their developmental potential will be explored. Lectures and readings will cover the development of embryonic, fetal and adult stem cells, and will examine their use in treating human disorders receiving widesread attention, including neurodegenerative diseases, heart disease, spinal cord injury and leukemia. The ethical, legal and social implications of stem cell research will also be discussed. Additional library investigation and a term paper or seminar will be required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BIOL 3350 Principles of Genetics or BIOL 2350 Genetics.

Cardiovascular Physiology (Formerly 81.462)

Description

This course will focus on human cardiovascular physiology in normal and diseased states. The objective of Cardiovascular Physiology is to reinforce the concept that the cardiovascular system can be understood in terms fundamental biophysical and cellular physiological principles. Quantitative aspects will be reinforces with problem sets in the accompanying lab course 81.463. Key concepts in the course will be placed in a medical context showing the underlying physiological concepts that lead to disease states such as; altered blood pressure, heart failure, valvular disease and arrhythmias.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.4190 Biochemistry, and BIOL 2520 Physiology, or BIOL 5520 Quantitative Physiology, or HSCI 1020 Human Anatomy & Physiology ll, and Co-req: BIOL 4630L Cardiovascular Physiology Lab.

Cardiovascular Physiology Lab (Formerly 81.463)

Description

Cardiovascular Physiology Lab is designed to supplement Cardiovascular Physiology 81.462. The objective of the course is to teach cardiovascular system function using problems sets as well as clinical and pathophysiological examples.

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.4620 Cardiovascular Physiology.

Molecular Biology (Formerly 81.467)

Description

A study of the principles and specialized techniques of cloning, purifying, and manipulating recombinant DNA molecules.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2350 Genetics or BIOL 3350 Principles of Genetics and BIOL 4190 Biochemistry.

Molecular Techniques (Formerly 81.469)

Description

Laboratory experiments and independent projects designed to illustrate current techniques and instrumentation used in genetic engineering. Included are restriction mapping, cloning, plasmid purification, blot hybridization, PCR, and DNA sequencing. Students are introduced to computer software utilized for DNA sequence analysis and manipulation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2350 Genetics, BIOL 4190 Biochemistry, and BIOL 4210L Biochemistry Techniques.

Virology (Formerly 81.472)

Description

A study of bacterial, animal, and plant viruses, including viral structure, modes of replication, biochemistry of the infected cell, genetic properties, and viral oncogenesis. Emphasis is on viruscell interaction at the molecular level.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2350 Genetics, and BIOL.2200 Principles of Cell & Molecular Biology.

Cell Culture (Formerly 81.476)

Description

A series of lecture and laboratory exercises that will focus on the in vitro culture and analysis of multiple cell type commonly used in biomedical research laboratories. The lecture component will review methodologies used to establish immortalized cell lines, medium component for specific cell types, and techniques for genetically manipulating and analyzing cell lines. The laboratory exercises will emphasize the mastery of sterile techniques used to grow both established cell line and primary cultures, and molecular tools used for introducing recombinant genes and for analyzing cell growth and differentiation.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: BIOL 4420 or BIOL 4600 or BIOL 4670, and BIOL 4210L or BIOL 5210L Biochemistry Techniques.

Developmental Biology

Description

This course covers the current understanding of the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that regulate animal development. Variation in developmental processes, including those involved in evolutionary change as well as disease, are discussed. Specific topics include: fertilization, determination of cell fate and differentiation. establishment of body plans, cell migration, organogenesis, morphogenesis, stem cells, and regeneration.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2200 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology, and Co-req: BIOL.4810L Developmental Biology Lab.

Developmental Biology Lab

Description

This course provides hands on experience in current methods and model systems used to investigate questions in developmental biology. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of embryonic systems, including intensively studied genetic model systems (e.g.C. elegans, zebrafish, mouse) and others with well-established experimental attributes (e.g. Chick, sea urchin). Analytical and experimental techniques used to explore invertebrate and vertebrate development include embryological manipulation, molecular and cell biology approaches. Conceptual topics include cell specification and differentiation, pattern formation, morphogenesis, and comparative embryology. This lab supplements the Developmental Biology lecture (BIOL.4800).

Prerequisites

Co-req: BIOL.4800 Developmental Biology.

Cancer Biology (Formerly 81.482)

Description

A study of the genes and proteins implicated in the cause of human cancer and discussion of the complex behaviors of cancer cells that differ from their normal counterparts in human tissue. Lectures and original research papers will be used.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.220 Principles of Cell & Molecular Biology

Comparative Vertebrate Embryology

Description

A comparative study of vertebrate embryological development focusing on the morphological development (e.g., Differentiation of tissues, organs, and systems) of vertebrates. Evolutionary relationships of the classes of vertebrates will be investigated through their anatomy. This course builds on concepts taught in Developmental Biology, providing more detailed analysis of tissue development in a comparative context.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2350 Genetics, and BIOL.2200 Principles of Cell & Molecular Biology.

Structural Biology (Formerly 81.488)

Description

Structural basis of the molecular biology of cells and the regulation of cellular processes will be discussed. This course will cover the fundamental knowledge about protein, nucleic acid and membrane structure in relation to central systems in biology. Topics to be discussed include structural enzymology, macromolecular assemblies for replication transcription, translation, membrane proteins, signal transduction, cell motility and transport, cell-cell interactions, the immune system, and virus structure.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BIOL.4190 Biochemistry.

Practical Protein Crystallography (Formerly 81.589 & 81.489)

Description

This course provides grounding in the principles and practice of protein x-ray crystallography. The course will be unique in format and provide both didactic and laboratory instruction. It is comprised of a series of lecture and laboratory exercises, with an emphasis on practical techniques and hands-on experience of modern protein crystallography. The course will cover the fundamental knowledge about x-ray physics, instrumentation and geometrical diffraction, protein crystallization, macromolecular data collection and processing, phase estimation and improvement, model building and refinement, and model assessment. Student will also be given a recently published structural paper for writhing a report on the subject.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2330L Experimental Methods in Biology, or BIOL 4210L Biochemistry Techniques.

Human Neurobiology (Formerly 81.490 & 81.590)

Description

A study of cellular and systems neurobiology with a focus on how these relate to human health and disease. Particular attention will be given to illustrating functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the human CNS using investigations into the pathogenic mechanisms of a variety of human neurodegenerative diseases including epilepsy, Alzheimer's Disease, Huntington's Disease, ALS among others. Note: Graduate level enrollees will be responsible for additional reading and writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: 81.419 Biochemistry.

Senior Project: Biology (Formerly 81.491)

Description

Individual, directed one semester research project taken in the fall and/or spring. Presentation of an acceptable project plan at the time of registration is required. A project report is required.

Senior Project: Biology (Formerly 81.492)

Description

Individual, directed one semester research project taken in the fall and/or spring. Presentation of an acceptable project plan at the time of registration is required. A project report is required.

Immunology (Formerly 81.493 & 81.593)

Description

A study of the nature of the immune response with sections on antibody structure, function and production; antigen-antibody reactions; immunogenetics; and immune regulation, protection and injury.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BIOL 1110 Principles of Biology I, BIOL 1170L Experimental Biology I, BIOL 1120 Principles of Biology II, and BIOL 1180L Experimental Biology II

Immunology Laboratory (Formerly 81.495 & 81.595)

Description

A series of basic laboratory exercises dealing with the preparation, isolation and characterization of antigens, antibodies and effector cells.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.493 Immunology.

Practicum Experience (Formerly 81.496)

Description

On-campus and/or off-campus experiences are developed by the student in consultation with a member of the student's major department. Specific requirements will vary depending upon department policies and the nature of the program undertaken by the student. The intent of the practicum experience is to provide an occasion for investigation of a scientific area and for applying techniques of problem solving and/or skills which are appropriate to the student's major discipline. The practicum experience may not be substituted for a required course in the major.

Directed Study: Biological Science (Formerly 81.497)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Directed Study: Biology (Formerly 81.498)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Directed Study: Biology (Formerly 81.499)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Introduction to Biology (Formerly 83.100)

Description

Presents environmental and organismal structural interrelationships and relates these to the chemical evolutionary basis of life. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences.

Prerequisites

Anti-Req: BIOL.1110 and BIOL.1220 and BIOL.2100 and LIFE.1010.

Life Science I (Formerly 83.101)

Description

Presents environmental and organismal structural interrelationships and relates these to the chemical evolutionary basis of life. Suitable as a Natural Science Elective for a degree in the Division of Sciences.

Prerequisites

Anti-Req: LIFE.1000 and BIOL.1110 and BIOL.1220 and BIOL.2100.

Life Science II (Formerly 83.102)

Description

Emphasis is on systems structure and function. The cellular organization of plants and animals leads into physiological processes of higher organisms with great emphasis on humans. Among topics considered are nutrition and digestion, cellular metabolism, circulation, respiration, excretion, nervous and skeletal-muscular systems. Also considered are the chemical interactions of these systems with immunity, hormonal and reproductive processes. Suitable as a Natural Science Elective for a degree in the Division of Sciences.

Life Science I Laboratory (Formerly 83.103)

Description

Concerned with experimentation and interpretation of some of the concepts of Life Science I. Suitable as a Natural Science Elective for a degree in the Division of Sciences.

Prerequisites

Pre/Co-Req: LIFE.1010 Life Science I.

Life Science II Laboratory (Formerly 83.104)

Description

Involved with experimentation and interpretation of some of the concepts of Life Science II. Suitable as a Natural Science Elective for a degree in the Division of Sciences.

Introduction to Biology Lab (Formerly 83.105)

Description

Introduction to Biology Laboratory is a co-requisite course for the Introduction to Biology online lecture course - 83.100. The two courses together fulfill a GenEd Science requirement. The lab course can be taken concurrently with the lecture course or subsequent to it. Weekly labs correspond directly with the chapter assignments provided by the 83.100 instructors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: LIFE.1000 Intro to Biology; not for Biology majors.

Human Biology (Formerly 83.106)

Description

Human Biology is designed to be an accelerated online summer course for non-science majors. This course will cover the major organ systems of the human body (cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, excretory, etc.), how they function and the disorders that arise when these systems don't function as they were intended.

Microbes and Society: Good, Bad and Ugly (Formerly 83.110)

Description

Examines historical aspects of microbial interactions with human society, including the use of microbes in food production, agriculture, biotechnology, industry and environmental preservation; explores bioterrorism, the problem of antibiotic resistance and surveys some historical and contemporary microbial diseases.

Nutrition and Disease (Formerly 83.123)

Description

Serves as an interdisciplinary survey course for students not majoring in biology, which deals with human nutrition as it relates to various chronic disease states. Methods of detection and treatment of the disorders are considered as well as general concepts of health promotion/disease prevention based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Specific topics covered include the role of nutrition in: heart disease, diabetes, cancer, obesity, alcoholism, and eating disorders. Not suitable for credits toward any degree in the Division of Sciences.

Plants and Human Society (Formerly 83.125)

Description

This course is designed primarily to fulfill the science elective requirement for the non-science major. Its purpose is to provide the undergraduate student who is not majoring in the biological sciences with an introduction to the study of plants and their importance in our everyday world. The importance of plants in agriculture, medicine and industry will be emphasized. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences.

Plants & Human Society Lab (Formerly 83.127)

Description

Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: 83.125 Plants & Human Society.

Life Science 1000 level elective (Formerly 83.199)

Description

Life Science 1000 level elective.

Human Ecology (Formerly 83.214)

Description

Designed to reveal and discuss the increasing problems of overpopulation in regard to environmental deterioration, living space, limits of natural resources and the adverse effects of human alteration on destruction of the natural ecosystem. The implications of current literature and news items will be emphasized. Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences.

Histology (Formerly 83.327)

Description

Not suitable for credit towards any degree in the Division of Sciences.