All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Asian American Studies

Description

This course provides students with an overview of the multidisciplinary field of Asian American Studies from two distinct disciplines. The course begins with the history of Asian American Studies and the methods used to advance the field. Next, various aspects of the Asian American experience, such as gender and sexuality, are examined. Students also participate in service learning in partnership with Asian-serving community organizations in and around Lowell, MA. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1010 or 1020 College Writing I or II or (42.103 Col Writing I-Internatl or ENGL 1110 College Writing I ESL) or HONR.1100.

Values and Creative Thinking (formerly 59.101)

Description

Values and Creative Thinking is a course designed specifically for freshmen. Throughout the semester you will be asked to examine your personal value system and how it relates to your education. The purpose of this course is to help you identify those individual qualities that you can use to achieve your highest academic potential. Specifically, this course is intended to help you develop greater self-awareness and confidence; creative and critical thinking skills; career planning skills designed to help you understand the full spectrum of available careers; an understanding of different computer technologies and multimedia techniques; an awareness of the role of values in determining your experiences and perspectives; problem solving and group decision making skills relating to issues that affect the quality of your life.

First Year Experience Seminar (Formerly 59.109)

Description

The First-Year Seminar is designed to help first year students get their college careers off to a good start. Students will be provided with an introduction to key concepts that will help them succeed as university students, including: information literacy and technology, strategies for transition to college and success, time management, healthy and safe life-styles, financial management, and an introduction to on-campus resources, such as those provided by Career Services, the Centers for Learning, and other campus programs. Seminars are arranged by students' program of study

Lowell as Text

Description

First year seminar for students interested in exploring Lowell, past and present, and using the city to investigate various other issues beyond local.

Career Planning Seminar

Description

The Career Planning Seminar is designed to provide students with the necessary structure, resources, and support to facilitate their career development and the pursuit of career goals. Through a variety of interactive teaching methodologies and assignments, students will participate in a sequence of learning activities including self-assessment, career exploration, and the job search process. The latter will include resume and cover letter writing, the online search, professional networking, and strategic interviewing. The goal of the course is to assist each student in developing a sound plan of action in pursuing their career objectives.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010 College Writing I, and ENGL.1020 College Writing II or HONR.1100, and open to all FAHSS majors.

Innovation Project

Description

This one credit course is designed to award academic credit for students who are engaged in a project associated with any of the Difference Maker competitions. In the College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, the annual Creative Venture Competition engages students in a project that creates a new product, program or service that addresses a societal need. Credit is awarded upon completion of all requirements of the competition. Since there is no in class requirement, and each project is different, a Project Description, rather than a syllabus is submitted.

Foundations in Liberal Studies (Formerly 59.213)

Description

The Foundations course is a required course for all BLA majors. The course examines the value and importance of drawing on various academic disciplines to understand issues that are too complex to be addressed effectively using any single discipline. Using a case study approach, the course will explore how the elements of various environment, governance, peace and conflict, etc. Upon completing the course, the student will be able to view the courses in his/her two BLA Concentrations from an interdisciplinary perspective by observing how elements of a give discipline can contribute to the understanding of global problems. These skills will be applied in the BLA Capstone course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BLA Maj & ENGL.1010 or 1020 College Writing 1 or 2, or HONR.1100 or equivalent.

Designing the Future World (Formerly 57.220)

Description

All purposeful human activity involves design. Every day we are surrounded by the products of design processes--buildings, cars, entertainment, corporations, schools, even laws and regulations. They make our lives easier in many ways, but they may also create significant social and environmental problems. In the past, designers often did not consider the impact of their deigns on society, or ignored the negative consequences. Our culture and legal system usually permitted, or even encouraged, this irresponsibility. Today, a small group of scholars, businessmen and women, and activists are rethinking how we design the things around us, with the goal of addressing the most pressing social and environmental issues. This class will introduce students to some of these issues, the people who are confronting them, and the ways in which all of us can contribute to designing a better Future World. With a series of hands on projects, coupled with readings and other resources, students will work to design aspects of the future. In the process you will learn about possible solutions to complex, important problems, but also learn valuable life skills such as problem framing, problem solving, critical thinking, active learning, communication, and simple construction methods. No previous experience is required-only curiosity and eagerness to learn.

Washington Center Term (Formerly 59.370)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Environmental Studies Practicum (Formerly 59.396)

Description

This course is the service learning capstone for the Environmental Studies Minor (soon to be created, after approval of this course). It emphasizes the cross-disciplinary examination of contemporary environmental issues, starting from the premise that they are multi-dimensional - biophysical, cultural, economic, ethical, historical, technical, etc. It requires only a few class meetings and otherwise involves students in work with local and regional environmental agencies and organizations. This service work is meant to encourage students to make connections between theory and practice, as well as to expand the conceptual and practical tool kit they need to understand environmental controversies and work toward sustainability.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 46.175 Intro to Environmental Studies.

BLA Capstone (Formerly 59.413)

Description

Student enrolled in the BLA program complete the BLA Capstone course during their senior year. This course features a semester-long interdisciplinary project, using knowledge gained from the students' two BLA concentrations, as well as any minors, as applicable. Students enrolled on-campus may choose to complete an original research study, creative art project (i,e., writing, film, music, drawing, etc.), or a problem-focused community action project. Online students choose to do either an original research project or a creative art project. Projects are completed in consultation with the instructor of the BLA Capstone course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: FAHS 2130 Foundations in Liberal Studies, and (ENGL 1020 College Writing ll or HONR.1100)

Directed Studies - Intercollegiate FAHSS (Formerly 59.491)

Description

Directed Studies - Intercollegiate FAHSS

Directed Study in Peer Tutoring (Formerly 59.496)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Directed Studies: Environment and Society

Description

An individual supervised research project relative to issues of the environment and society. Thematic or methodological issues must result in a significant research paper.