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Quantitative Literacy (QL)

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Cost Accounting (Formerly ACCT/60.321)

Description

An examination of the manufacturing function from the view of the cost accountant. Managerial control of the elements of product costs will be studied with an emphasis on cost accumulation systems both historical and estimated. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ACCT.3010 Intermediate Accounting, or ACCT.3100 Corporate Financial Reporting I, with a "C" or better.

Physical Chemistry I (Formerly 84.344)

Description

Covers basic physical chemical topics: laws of thermodynamics, solutions, chemical and phase equilibria, electrochemistry, kinetics, atomic, and molecular structure. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 2310 Calculus III, CHEM 1220 Chemistry II, PHYS 1410 Physics I; Co-Req CHEM 3460L Physical Chem Lab I or Chemical Engineering (BS) or Chemistry (BS).

Unit Operations Laboratory (Formerly 10.315)

Description

Students perform laboratory base experimental analyses in fluid flow and heat transfer and fluid flow and heat transfer unit operations processes common in Chemical Engineering practice. The course is team based and students are expected to develop and improve in their ability to work and interact in a group environment. Written and oral reports are required. Safety in both lad and industrial practice are emphasized. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEN.2020 Energy Balance and Introduction to Thermodynamics, and CHEN.3030 Fluid Mechanics, and ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Analysis of Algorithms (Formerly 91.404)

Description

Development of more sophisticated ideas in data type and structure, with an introduction to the connection between data structures and the algorithms they support. Data abstraction. Controlled access structures. Trees, lists, stacks, queues, graphs, arrays, hash tables. Algorithm design strategies such as divide and conquer. Elementary techniques for analysis; asymptotic analysis, recursion equations, estimation methods, elementary combinatorial arguments. Examination of problem areas such as searching and sorting, and the indicated representations and algorithms. The student will use the techniques learned in this course and in previous courses to solve a number of logically complex programming problems using pseudocode, with an emphasis on establishing algorithmic correctness and estimating time and space complexity.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: COMP 1020 Computing II, MATH 3220 Discrete Structures ll and MATH 3860 Probability & Statistics I.

Principles of Microeconomics (Formerly 49.201)

Description

Studies the principles of production and exchange. An introduction to demand, supply, pricing, and output under alternative market structures. Derived demand and resource markets are introduced. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Labor Economics (Formerly 49.302)

Description

An introduction to the economic analysis of behaviors and institutions in the labor market: labor supply and participation, labor demand by firms, wage determination under different institutional settings, and gender, race or ethnicity as determinants of different labor market outcomes. The course presents microeconomic models, empirical findings and their public policy implications on topics such as minimum wage, affirmative action, social insurance programs, workplace safety, and subsidized day care.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics).

Microeconomic Theory (Formerly 49.303)

Description

Provides an advanced examination of price and production theory and the theory of the consumer and the firm.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ECON.2010 Economics I, and MATH.1220 Management Calculus, or MATH.1310 Calculus I, or MATH.1320 Calculus II, or MATH.2310 Calculus III.

Electronics I (Formerly 16.365)

Description

A brief introduction to solid-state physics, leading to discussion of physical characteristics of p-n junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field-effect transistors: active, saturated, and cutoff models of bipolar transistors and triode, constant current, and cutoff models of MOSFETs. Circuit models for diodes, and diode applications. Circuit models for transistors, and transistor applications in bipolar and MOS digital circuits and low-frequency amplifier circuits. Analysis of digital circuits and linear circuits based on application of circuit models of devices and circuit theory.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE 2020 Circuit Theory ll, and PHYS 1440 Physics ll, and Co-req: EECE 3110 Electronics l Lab.

Engineering Capstone Design Project (Formerly 25.401)

Description

Integrative design experience in engineering. Students work on multi-disciplinary teams and apply their engineering problem-solving skills on open-ended, real-world projects Projects may be service-oriented in concept and teams may include members from other Departments and Colleges. Emphasis on communication, team-work, report-writing, oral presentations, This course may be used as a Technical elective for all Engineering Departments. Alternatively, this course may be used as a substitute for the culminating Capstone course in Electrical and Computer Engineering (16.499), Mechanical Engineering (22.423) and Plastics Engineering (26.416). Prerequisite: senior status & permission of instructor.

Prerequisites

Level Senior Standing.

Finance for Emerging Business Enterprises (Formerly ENTR /64.464)

Description

Course content covers financial aspects of an entrepreneurial venture from its start to a potential sale. Major sources of financing covered in the course include venture capital, private placement, bank credit, and public financing. Other financial concepts covered include organization of the business, financial forecasting, financial analysis, firm valuation and acquisitions.

Prerequisites

Junior Level or Higher or Permission of Instructor.

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans (Formerly 87.202)

Description

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans deals with the atmosphere, and oceans, as well as the important role they play within Earth's vital systems. These interactions will address atmospheric structure, processes, and pollution. It will also address ocean-atmosphere exchange, ocean structure, processes, pollution, and coastal and deep sea sedimentation processes.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.2040L Earth Systems Atmosphere and Oceans Lab, and Kennedy College of Science majors only.

Earth Systems: Geosphere Laboratory (Formerly

Description

The Laboratory component Earth Systems: Geosphere requires the student to make measurements, analyze and plot data, draw conclusions from the data plots, characterize and identify earth materials, and interpret geospatial representations. These skills will follow lecture material and increase understanding through active learning.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.2010 Earth Systems: Geoscience, and Kennedy College of Science majors only.

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans Laboratory (Formerly 87.204)

Description

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans Lab is designed to complement the lecture material from ENVI.2020 - Earth Systems Atmosphere and Oceans. This course, along with the other Earth Systems courses and corresponding labs use a systems-based approach for the topic of Earth and Environmental Science. This laboratory will concentrate on the Atmosphere and Oceanography.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.2020 Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans, and Kennedy College of Science majors only.

Research Methods in Exercise Physiology (Formerly 38.417)

Description

This course involves an in-depth study of current research methods and topics with specific applications to the field of Exercise Physiology. The content includes the sources of data acquisition, research design, testing procedures, and treatment of data. Each student must participate in a senior research project utilizing information gained from the lecture portion of the class. All 1st 2nd and 3rd year course work in the exercise physiology major. All exercise physiology undergraduate courses (number 38) are restricted to EP majors only. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and MATH.2830 Introduction to Statistics.

Financial Management (Formerly FINA/61.301)

Description

Principles of financial management, including working and fixed capital, sources of funds, financial statements, financial planning and capital structure.

Prerequisites

Pre-reqs: ECON 2010 Economics I & ACCT.2010 Acct/Financial; or Business minor and ACCT.2010 Acct/Financial.

Forensic Geology (Formerly 89.215)

Description

This course deals with the application of geological and related principles to the solution of various types of crimes. The course will explore the use of evidence (rocks and minerals, soils, geochemistry, etc.) to identify the source and hence the potential perpetrator of the crime. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Quantitative Reasoning (Formerly 92.111)

Description

An introduction to the mathematics concepts and skills important in modern society, even for non-technical pursuits. The course will emphasize conceptual understanding as well as a facility in performing elementary computations. Topics to be examined will include types of reasoning, problem-solving methods, techniques of estimation, algebraic essentials, and the nature of probability and statistics. No credit in Science or Engineering.

Differential Equations (Formerly 92.234)

Description

Topics include methods of solutions for linear and non-linear first order differential equations, linear second order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, systems of first-order differential equations. Laplace transforms. Numerical methods. Applications to physical systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

Engineering Differential Equations (Formerly 92.236)

Description

Introduction to differential equations with an emphasis on engineering applications. Topics include first-order equations, higher-order linear equations with constant coefficients, and systems of first-order equations. Applications of each topic are introduced and qualitative, analytical, and numerical solution techniques are studied. Laplace transform methods are discussed. The software package MATLAB is used throughout the course for both analytical and numerical calculations.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

Introduction to Statistics (Formerly 92.283)

Description

An introduction to descriptive statistics, graphing and data analysis, probability laws, discrete and continuous probability distributions, correlation and regression, inferential statistics. No credit in Sciences (except Biology and EEAS) or Engineering. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Thermal Fluids Laboratory (Formerly 22.403)

Description

Continuation of Mechanical Engineering Lab I. Focuses on digital data acquisition systems used on mechanical engineering equipment. Students design measurement systems composed of various transducers, their associated signal conditioners and digital data acquisition and recording devices. Statistical methods are emphasized. Experiments require the students to provide calibration and to select appropriate sampling rates and test durations. Systems under test range from simple multisensor laboratory apparatus to actual operating mechanical systems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MECH.3820 Heat Transfer, with a C- or better.

Data Communications and Networks (Formerly 63.404, MIST 304)

Description

A comprehensive overview of concepts and practice in Business Data Communications and Networking. Explores the principles and applications of data communications in organizations from familiar applications into the more technical aspects of telecom architecture. Analyzes the various types of telecom networks, and how they are designed and configured, including issues involving the management and decision-making process within the telecom department. Students provided with hands-on network administration and configuration experience with a LAN administrator. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MIST.2010 Mgmt Information Systems, or Instructor permission.

Marketing Analytics (Formerly MKTG 411/62.411/62.312)

Description

Course number was formerly 62.312. Focuses on marketing strategies and tactics. Emphasis is given on research methods and applications for strategy building and implementation. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MKTG.2010 Marketing Principles; preference Marketing concentrators; COM filter courses.

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation (Formerly 36.361)

Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of clinical chemistry laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis is placed on theoretical concepts, instrument components and design, calibration and troubleshooting of modern instrumentation, and analytical methodologies in the clinical laboratory. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative applications of instrumental techniques are covered. Computer applications are included where appropriate. The following spectroscopic instruments are studied: ultraviolet, visible and infra red absorption, fluorescence, turbidimetry and nephelometry, reflectance, flame emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods of analysis are reviewed, including potentiometric techniques, voltammetry and coulometry. Chromatographic instrumentation and methods are discussed, such as column and thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2520 Physiological Chemistry II, or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, or CHEM.1120 General Chemistry II, and Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences(BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation Laboratory (Formerly 36.363)

Description

The course is designed to provide an introduction to clinical laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis is placed on theoretical concepts, instrument components, and troubleshooting of modern instrumentation and analytical methodologies routinely used in the fields of Clinical Laboratory and Nutritional Sciences. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative applications of each instrumental technique are covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2520 Physiological Chemistry II, or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, or CHEM.1120 General Chemistry II, and Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences(BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Community-Focused Health and Policy (Formerly 33.320)

Description

This course provides a foundation to community health nursing with the community, family and individual as Client. This course presents an overview of the US health care delivery system with an emphasis on the role of government in healthcare, Medicaid, and current efforts at healthcare reform.

Community Health and Health Policy (Formerly 33.412)

Description

This course analyzes the development of policy and its impact on the health of populations. Students apply epidemiology and community health science to population-based nursing practice. Students identify a community health problem that can be addressed through health promotion activities.

Introduction to Logic and Critical Reasoning (Formerly 45.202)

Description

Studies the methods used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. This course will aim at developing (1) an ability to express one's ideas clearly and concisely; (2) an increased skill in defining one's terms; and(3) a capacity to formulate arguments vigorously and to scrutinize them critically. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Exploring the Universe (Formerly 95.121)

Description

Addresses topics that include: Planet Earth, its structure, plate tectonics, greenhouse effect, ozone layer, craters and dinosaurs; our satellite Moon;other planets; our star Sun and its energy source; other stars, the HR diagram and stellar evolution, white dwarfs, neutron stars, supernovae, black holes; our galaxy, the Milky Way, its structure; other galaxies; the universe, its structures and expansion; evolution of galaxies, quasars, cosmology, the Big Bang and Unification of the forces of nature. Satisfies Gen Ed science requirements for non-science majors. Does not satisfy science requirements for Science majors but may be used as a free elective by Science majors.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: PHYS.1210 Lab for Exploring the Universe; Anti-Req: ENVI.1150 Astronomy.

Advanced Experimental Physics Laboratory I (Formerly 96.393)

Description

Some of the most significant experiments in the history of physics are revisited. Form measuring the universal gravity constant to observing the quantization of light and matter, this laboratory course challenges students' experimental skills and tests their understanding of fundamental concepts. Preparing high quality lab reports and presentations is emphasized.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PHYS.2610L The Physics of Materials & Devices, or PHYS.2450L Physics II lab, with a grade of C- or better and PHYS.2620L Principles of Laboratory Automation with a grade of C- or better.

Nuclear Instrumentation (Formerly 96.406)

Description

This course provides the operating principles and applications of nuclear radiation detection systems, including detector theory, electronic signal processing, and measurement and data reduction techniques. The systems covered include gas-filled detectors (ion chambers, proportional counters, and Geiger-Mueller counters), inorganic and organic scintillators, and high-purity germanium detectors, for the detection of alpha, beta, gamma, and neuron radiation. This course also covers hypothesis testing, detection limits, and detector dead time (offered as 98.506 for graduate credit).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PHYS 2100 Intro Modern Physics and PHYS 2610L The Physics of Materials & Dev or PHYS 2450L Physics III Lab

Thermodynamics (Formerly 26.247)

Description

This course introduces the concepts of system definition, pure substance properties, phase behavior and engine cycles. The laws of Thermodynamics are introduced and used to determine equilibrium states of systems, conservation of energy and directionality of energy transformation. Mathematical analysis of closed and flowing systems and engineering devices used in polymer processing is reviewed. It concludes with a discussion of introductory level polymer thermodynamics. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcomes for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II and PHYS 1410 Physics I, Permission of Instructor.

Methods of Experimental Analysis (Formerly 26.306)

Description

Methods for design and analysis of experiments provided in three course modules: (1) descriptive and inferential statistics for hypothesis testing: (2) analysis of variance and linear regression for model building; and (3) factorial, fractional factorial, and response surface design of experiments for decision support and optimization. Course incorporates project work with modern statistical programming. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL) and Critical thinking and problem solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

Polymer Science for Engineers I (Formerly 26.381)

Description

An introduction to polymer science with a focus on making polymers. Topics covered include the chemistry, kinetics, and statistics of step and chain polymerizations and copolymerizations, polymerization processes. Industrially relevant polymers and commercial polymerization processes will be highlighted, with coverage of the health and safety aspects of various approaches to the preparation of various polymers given. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PLAS 2010 Polymer Materials I or PLAS 2020 Polymeric Materials II and CHEM 2040 Intro to Organic & Polymer Chemistry or CHEM 2210 Organic Chemistry I.

Research Methods in Political Science (Formerly 46.301)

Description

This is a course in designing Quantitative Research and applying statistics for Political Scientific. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req:POLI.2010 Intro Political Analysis.

Service Management (Formerly POMS 403/63.470)

Description

This course is intended to provide students with the necessary tools and understanding for managing service operations. Service firms represent the fastest-growing sector of the economy. This course will focus on the various aspects involved in the management of service operations. The service operations are managed differently to their intangibility, time-sensitivity, high levels of customer involvement and lack of engineering standards. This course will explore topics such as design and delivery of services, the measurement of productivity and quality, managing capacity and demand, redesign of service delivery processes, management of technology, and others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: POMS.3010 Operations Management.

Research II: Statistics (Formerly 47.369)

Description

An intermediate level course building on competence in quantitative reasoning skills and the fundamentals of research methods, and focusing on descriptive and inferential statistics and their application and interpretation. The course will include basic computational approaches; the primary goal is for students to develop the ability to articulate and apply statistical concepts, and communicate statistical results. The course includes topics in basic inferential statistics from z-scores up to and including chi-square and factorial ANOVA. Students will learn to use a database and conduct statistical analyses using standard software packages. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods with 'C' or better.

Introduction to Epidemiology (Formerly 31.305)

Description

This course is designed to introduce basic epidemiological methods used in the study of current major health problems. Content includes explanation of the scope and focus of epidemiology, simple measures of disease frequency and association used in the study of the distribution and determinants of disease, types of epidemiological study designs, and practical applications. Emphasis on interpretation of epidemiological information and application of findings Prerequisite: Community Health and an elementary statistics course. Required for seniors in Community Health Education; open by permission to other upper division students in Health Professions. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PUBH.2010 Community Health and Environment, or PUBH.1021 Intro to Public Health, & MATH.2380 Intro to Statistics, Public Health Majors/Minors only, Nutritional Sci, or Pharmaceutical Sci, Jr/Sr Majors only, or Instructor Permission required.

Quantitative Methods for Social Research (Formerly 48.402)

Description

An introduction to methods of social research, with emphasis on quantitative research methods. Presents basic statistical techniques used in social research as well as the computer software used for analyzing social science data. For majors only.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: SOCI.2020 Foundations of Social Analysis, and Sociology Majors only or permission of instructor.