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Critical Thinking & Problem Solving Course Listing

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Advanced Financial Accounting I (Formerly ACCT/60.401)

Description

Explores issues in accounting for large, multinational business entities. Consolidation, mergers, home office/branch accounting, international accounting topics, partnership and nonprofit organizations are also examined. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ACCT.3020 Intermediate Accounting II, or ACCT.3300 Corporate Financial Reporting III, with a "C" or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P".

Post-digital Aesthetics

Description

Post-digital Aesthetics explores art after the digital revolution focusing on critical analysis of digital images and environments. We will study how digital technology has transformed art making and also how it impacts the very definition of art. The blurring of boundaries between art, life and design is more than ever evident as human experiences are increasingly mediated through technological devices and high-quality design. The internet has dramatically altered how and why we make art while virtual presence and embodiment in VR bring unprecedented questions about the role of artists and designers in our understanding of the world. This course will be taught as a face-to-face seminar. However, we will also travel beyond the classroom walls into virtual worlds and environments.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Junior or Senior Status or Permission of Instructor.

Art Concepts I (formerly 70.101)

Description

Art Concepts I will focus on learning the visual language of the creative process through anexamination of the principles of two-dimensional visual organization. These fundamental basics form the underlying structure of all studio and communication arts. Through slide lecture, guest lecturers, field trips, and studio projects, students will begin to understand the many forms that visual expression takes. The course will develop creative problem solving skills and students will learn to respond to personal challenge. Students will also be instructed in the principles of professional execution and be introduced to diverse modes of thought, media, and aesthetic expression. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Kinetic Projects (Formerly 70.135)

Description

Kinetic Projects is a hybrid course designed for a variety of majors to explore the intersections between mechanical engineering and sculpture. In this project-driven class, students will learn principles and practice in both the fields of engineering and art, and put them into practice by creating functioning kinetic objects to be displayed in a public setting. The course will also include guest lectures from practitioners in Art and Engineering. The course provides an introduction to technical communications, teamwork, data analysis, computer coding, computer-aided drafting/design/modeling program usage, prototyping techniques, report-writing and /or oral presentation.

Senior Studio I (formerly 70.493)

Description

Senior Studio I is on of the two capstone courses of the Bachelor of Fine Arts program in the Art Department. Students are required to research, develop and produce a mature, coherent and substantial body of work representing 6 credits (in a two course sequence) that will be presented to the faculty for evaluation as well as exhibited to the public in the BFA Senior Studio exhibition. Enrollment restricted to majors in BFA program. Senior Studio k will focus on research, professional portfolio, resume and artist statement.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Fine Arts (BFA) and Level Senior Standing.

Senior Studio (formerly 70.497)

Description

This course is designed to culminate four years of art experience for the BFA studies. The development of personal approach to media and idea is emphasized. Each student will be responsible for developing a self-assigned thematic concern. No assignments will be made by the instructor who will act only as an advisor and coordinator. Course evaluation is by the Senior Studio Review Committee. Enrollment restricted to majors in BFA program. Fall and Spring. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Information Literacy (IL).

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Fine Arts (BFA) and Level Senior Standing.

The Physical Science of Climate Change

Description

Due to the complexity of climate change, there are many important dimensions to the problem, including political, economic, social, and ethical. This course focuses on the physical science dimension of climate change: what are the key scientific principles that are needed to understand the causes and physical impacts of climate change, and to evaluate possible responses and their likely effectiveness The class is offered for both science and non-science majors.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ATMO.1520L The Physical Science of Climate Change Lab.

Genetics (Formerly 81.235)

Description

The theories of both classical and molecular genetics are explored with emphasis on the experimental evidence which has laid the foundation for contemporary understanding of genetics, included is the nature of the genetic material, gene action, genetic recombination, gene regulation, gene interaction, the production and inheritance of genetic phenotypes, chromosomal mechanics, and the behavior of genes in populations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.1110 Principles of Biology l, with a grade of C- or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P".

Biochemistry (Formerly 81.419)

Description

Studies the structure and properties of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids which combined with a discussion of elementary enzymology allows for detailed descriptions of several important degradative and biosynthetic pathways, their integration and regulation. Throughout the course, emphasis is on methods and practical application of fundamental information to the solution of problems of current biomedical interest.

Prerequisites

Pre-req CHEM 2220 Organic Chemistry II or CHEM 2230 Organic Chemistry IIB and BIOL 2200 Principles of Cell and Molecular Biology or BIOL 2350 Genetics or BIOL 2120L Biology for Engineers.

Biomedical Capstone I

Description

This is the first of a two course capstone sequence. It provides an integrative design experience in engineering. Students work in teams and apply their engineering problem solving skills on open-ended, real-world biomedical projects. This course has an emphasis on team work, communication, report writing, oral presentations, project definition and project planning.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMEN.3200 Quantitative Physiology, and BMEN.3205L Quantitative Physiology Lab, and Pre- or Co-req: BMEN.3100 Transport Phenomena, and BMEN.4310 Biomechanics.

Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (Formerly 84.346)

Description

Laboratory work designed to exemplify principles covered in 84.344. Required for chemistry majors. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CHEM 1240L Chemistry II Lab; Co-Req: CHEM 3440 Physical Chemistry I.

Engineering Economics and Process Analysis (Formerly 10.409)

Description

This course brings together all the Chemical Engineering core principles applied to the development of economic process designs. Economic evaluations of manufacturing operations and projects including essential concepts in accounting, depreciation, time value of money, and the evaluation of investment alternatives are applied for process analysis and design objectives. The impact of management and production costs, product markets, regulatory, environmental and safe production practices, the analysis of corporate annual reports including balance sheets and income statements, and capital and operating costs are all considered in regard to efficient and economic processes. In addition to lecture materials students are required to complete comprehensive projects. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Information Literacy (IL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEN.2010,and CHEN.2020, and CHEN.3030, and CHEN.3040, and CHEN.3060, and CHEN.3100, and CHEN.3110, and CHEN.3150, and CHEN.3170, and CHEN.4030 all with a grade of C- or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P", and Co-req: CHEN 4130.

Chemical Plant Design (Formerly 10.410)

Description

This course is the logical continuation of CHEN.4090 (Formerly 10.409) The principles of technical and economic evaluation are applied to a chemical engineering problem. A group of students is given a statement of the problem. They are required to find information on raw materials, products, thermodynamic parameters and plant practices in order to develop the assumptions required to carry out an examination of technical and economic feasibility. Each group generates a final report for the problem. In addition to oral presentations, students are required to complete a comprehensive group design project. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Information Literacy (IL).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEN.2010, & CHEN.2020, & CHEN.3030, & CHEN.3040,& CHEN.3060, &CHEN.3100, and CHEN.3110, & CHEN.3150, & CHEN.3170, & CHEN.4030, & CHEN.4090, & CHEN.4130 all with a C- or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P", & Co-req: CHEN.4150.

Analysis of Algorithms (Formerly 91.404)

Description

Development of more sophisticated ideas in data type and structure, with an introduction to the connection between data structures and the algorithms they support. Data abstraction. Controlled access structures. Trees, lists, stacks, queues, graphs, arrays, hash tables. Algorithm design strategies such as divide and conquer. Elementary techniques for analysis; asymptotic analysis, recursion equations, estimation methods, elementary combinatorial arguments. Examination of problem areas such as searching and sorting, and the indicated representations and algorithms. The student will use the techniques learned in this course and in previous courses to solve a number of logically complex programming problems using pseudocode, with an emphasis on establishing algorithmic correctness and estimating time and space complexity.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: COMP 1020 Computing II, MATH 3220 Discrete Structures ll and MATH 3860 Probability & Statistics I.

Capstone Seminar in Criminology & Criminal Justice (Formerly 44.489)

Description

This course is designed to provide criminal justice majors with a capstone experience emphasizing integration of knowledge acquired in previous courses on the causes of criminal behavior and responses to it, particularly the institutions, policies and practices of the criminal justice system. Students engage in the development and production of a senior level research paper grounded in relevant criminology and criminal justice literature.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CRIM 1010 Criminal Justice System, CRIM 2210 Criminology l, CRIM 3900 CJ Research Methods and Senior-level standing.

Macroeconomic Theory (Formerly 49.304)

Description

Building on Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON.2020), this course studies goods markets and money markets in further detail. Emphasis is placed on aggregate labor markets and also on the relationship between inflation, unemployment, and aggregate output. These topics are contextualized in order to examine aggregate economic developments in the short, medium, and long run. Optimal monetary and fiscal policies are examined against this background. Select additional topics are covered, such as the basics of open-economy macroeconomics. This course meets the Essential Learning Outcome of Critical Thinking and Problem Solving (CTPS) as defined under the Core Curriculum requirements.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ECON.2020 Principles of Macroeconomics, and MATH.1210 Management Pre-Calculus, or MATH.1220 Management Calculus, or MATH.1310 Calculus I, or MATH.1320 Calculus II, or MATH.2310 Calculus III.

Health Economics (Formerly 49.345)

Description

An introduction to the economic analysis of health care market The course presents microeconomic models, empirical findings and public policies referring to the following topics: the production and demand for health (the investment/consumption aspects of health and the relationship between socio economic status and health status), the issues of moral hazard and adverse selection in the insurance market, the role of information in the physician-patient relationship, the different regulation and payment systems for providers, the Medicare and Medicaid programs, and the comparisons between the US system and the health systems of other western economies and developing countries. This class aims to help students becoming more informed future citizens and consumers or producers of healthcare. Prerequisites: 49.201 or instructor's approval. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON.2010 Principles of Microeconomics

Mathematics and Problem Solving in the Inclusive E

Description

There is a renewed focus in creating math learning environments in the elementary classroom where students are continuously involved in problem solving. In fact, one of the main goals in elementary math is to provide children with the experiences and support to use a variety of strategies to solve real-world problems. This course will help preservice teachers understand how children with different strengths learn math so the can develop, create, implement, and assess lessons and units that align with the Massachusetts Math Common Core State Standards.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Only students enrolled in BA Ed. degree program.

Electronics I Lab (Formerly 16.311)

Description

Laboratory experiments coordinated with the subject matter of Electronics I. This lab explores the characteristics and use of electronic instrumentation for making measurements on electronic circuits. Labs will utilize the methods of designing and characterizing diode and transistor circuits. They will analyze the performance characteristics of digital and linear semiconductor circuits, including logic elements and amplifiers. The design and construction of circuits using monolithic op amps will also be explored.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: EECE.2080 Basic EE Lab II, and Co-req: EECE.3650 Electronics I.

Critical Methods of Literary Inquiry (Formerly 42.200)

Description

Examination of diverse critical and theoretical approaches to literature in the development of literary analysis.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Engl.1010, and ENGL.1020, and Must be an English major, or and English minor, or and BLA-writing concentrator, or BLA-literature concentrator, or a Journalism and Professional Writing minor, or Creative Writing minor.

Play Analysis (Formerly 42.233)

Description

An introduction to the principles of play construction and the vocabulary and methods of interpreting play texts for theatrical production. Required of all theatre arts concentrators.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College writing II, or English Majors, or Theatre Minors.

Selected Authors (Formerly 42.401)

Description

A study of selected works. Authors to be announced each semester.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, and Junior Level or higher

Creative Writing: Capstone (Formerly 42.450)

Description

In this intensive workshop course, upper-level students in the creative writing concentration work for an entire semester on a reading and longer-form writing project in one of three genres - poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students devise reading lists specific to their writing projects, with instructor's guidance. Through a creative process that involves planning and drafting, peer workshop, instructor feedback, and rigorous revision, students ultimately create portfolios that represent their best undergraduate writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 3660 Creative Writing: Poetry II, or ENGL 4070 Creative Writing: Fiction II, or ENGL 4180 Creative Writing: Non-fiction II.

Starting a New Venture (Formerly ENTR/64.361)

Description

This course is designed for students with a curiosity and interest in starting a new business. In this course, students will explore the entrepreneurship process including how entrepreneurs discover and evaluate the sources and opportunities for new business ventures; how they assemble the resources, how they operate and grow a new business; and finally how they harvest their hard work as successful entrepreneurs. The course covers a variety of topics associated with launching and running a new business venture, such as marketing, financing, building the venture team, legal and regulatory issues, and social and environmental issues. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Junior Level or Higher or Permission of Instructor.

Earth Systems: Geosphere Laboratory (Formerly

Description

The Laboratory component Earth Systems: Geosphere requires the student to make measurements, analyze and plot data, draw conclusions from the data plots, characterize and identify earth materials, and interpret geospatial representations. These skills will follow lecture material and increase understanding through active learning.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.2010 Earth Systems: Geoscience, and Kennedy College of Science majors only.

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans Laboratory (Formerly 87.204)

Description

Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans Lab is designed to complement the lecture material from ENVI.2020 - Earth Systems Atmosphere and Oceans. This course, along with the other Earth Systems courses and corresponding labs use a systems-based approach for the topic of Earth and Environmental Science. This laboratory will concentrate on the Atmosphere and Oceanography.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.2020 Earth Systems: Atmosphere and Oceans, and Kennedy College of Science majors only.

Exercise Physiology (Formerly 38.305)

Description

This course will examine the short and long term effects of exercise of the oxygen transport systems, including understanding the concepts of physiological and metabolic functioning of the human body during aerobic physical activity, exercise, sports performance and training. Students taking this course and its lab co-requisite are advised that the capability to exercise moderately and maximally will be necessary.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.1020 Anatomy & Physiology II, and HSCI.2520 Physiological Chemistry II, or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, and Co-req: EXER.3070 Exercise Physiology Lab, and EP or ES Majors, or ES Minors.

Exercise Prescription & Programming (Formerly 38.422)

Description

This course provides an essential foundation for exercise prescription and programming, and sound educational practice. Factors that impede or enhance exercise compliance and progress are explored. Clinical teaching skills, safety, and professional behavior are also addressed.

Prerequisites

Co-req: EXER.4060 Foundations of Strength and Conditioning.

Foundations in Liberal Studies (Formerly 59.213)

Description

Foundations of Liberal Studies is a required course for all BLA majors. This course examines the value and importance of drawing on several academic disciplines to understand issues that are too complex to be addressed effectively using any single discipline. Using a case study approach, we will examine how the elements of various disciplines can be integrated and synthesized to understand and give voice to complex issues dealing with health, environment, governance, peace and conflict, etc. Upon completing the course, students will be able to view the courses in their tow BLA concentrations from an interdisciplinary perspective by observing how elements of each discipline can contribute to the understanding of global problems. These skills will be applied in the BLA Capstone Course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: BLA Maj & ENGL.1010 or 1020 College Writing 1 or 2, or HONR.1100 or equivalent.

Designing the Future World (Formerly 57.220)

Description

All purposeful human activity involves design. Every day we are surrounded by the products of design processes--buildings, cars, entertainment, corporations, schools, even laws and regulations. They make our lives easier in many ways, but they may also create significant social and environmental problems. In the past, designers often did not consider the impact of their deigns on society, or ignored the negative consequences. Our culture and legal system usually permitted, or even encouraged, this irresponsibility. Today, a small group of scholars, businessmen and women, and activists are rethinking how we design the things around us, with the goal of addressing the most pressing social and environmental issues. This class will introduce students to some of these issues, the people who are confronting them, and the ways in which all of us can contribute to designing a better Future World. With a series of hands on projects, coupled with readings and other resources, students will work to design aspects of the future. In the process you will learn about possible solutions to complex, important problems, but also learn valuable life skills such as problem framing, problem solving, critical thinking, active learning, communication, and simple construction methods. No previous experience is required-only curiosity and eagerness to learn.

Investment and Portfolio Analysis (Formerly FINA 321/61.304 )

Description

This course is a survey of investments for business students. Topics include the investment environment, markets and instruments, securities trading, market indexes, risk, diversification, the capital asset pricing model, market efficiency, introductory valuation of bonds stocks options and futures, mutual funds, behavioral finance, and strategies for individual inves­tors. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Information Literacy (IL).

Prerequisites

Pre-reqs: ECON 2010 Economics I & ACCT.2010 Acct/Financial; or Business minor and ACCT.2010 Acct/Financial; and COM filter courses.

Principles of Corporate Finance (Formerly FINA 331/61.431)

Description

Advanced study of the principles of financial analysis. Covers topics such as acquisition of long-term assets, capital budgeting models, and the analysis of mutually exclusive projects.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: FINA.3010 Financial Management.

Forensic Geology (Formerly 89.215)

Description

This course deals with the application of geological and related principles to the solution of various types of crimes. The course will explore the use of evidence (rocks and minerals, soils, geochemistry, etc.) to identify the source and hence the potential perpetrator of the crime. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Research Seminar (Formerly 43.432)

Description

Systematic research in primary and secondary sources culminating in the writing of an original research paper using proper methodological and stylistic techniques. Weekly meetings and written and oral progress reports. Students must be acquainted with word-processing techniques. Required of all History majors. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Differential Equations (Formerly 92.234)

Description

Topics include methods of solutions for linear and non-linear first order differential equations, linear second order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, systems of first-order differential equations. Laplace transforms. Numerical methods. Applications to physical systems.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH.1320 Calculus II, or MATH.1260 Calculus B.

Engineering Differential Equations (Formerly 92.236)

Description

Introduction to differential equations with an emphasis on engineering applications. Topics include first-order equations, higher-order linear equations with constant coefficients, and systems of first-order equations. Applications of each topic are introduced and qualitative, analytical, and numerical solution techniques are studied. Laplace transform methods are discussed. The software package MATLAB is used throughout the course for both analytical and numerical calculations.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 1320 Calculus II.

Kinetic Projects

Description

Kinetic Projects is a hybrid course designed for a variety of majors to explore the intersections between mechanical engineering and sculpture. In this project-driven class, students will learn principles and practice in both the fields of engineering and art, and put them into practice by creating functioning kinetic objects to be displayed in a public setting. The course will also include guest lectures from practitioners in Art and Engineering. The course also provides an introduction to technical communications, teamwork, data analysis, computer coding, and introduction to CAD prototyping, report-writing and/or oral presentation.

Kinematics of Mechanisms (Formerly 22.321)

Description

Design and kinematic analysis of mechanisms. Course topics include linkage synthesis and motion analysis (position, velocity and acceleration), cam, gear and power train design, and technical communication. This course meets the Essential Learning Outcome of Critical Thinking and Problem Solving as defined under the Core Curriculum requirements. As such, the course will reinforce the students' ability to identify, analyze, interpret, and evaluate arguments, data, evidence, problems, and conclusions as part of formulating an opinion or conclusion, and then use that information to design, evaluate and implement a strategy to achieve a desired outcome.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: C- in ENGN.2050 Statics and C- in ENGN.2070 Dynamics, and Pre-Co req MECH.2010 Computer Aided Design and Mechanical Engineering majors only.

Negotiation Strategy and Process (Formerly MGMT/66.410)

Description

Analysis and application of the key factors that shape and characterize different negotiation situations; the analytical skill to diagnose potential areas of difference and select appropriate strategies to address them; the interpersonal skills to tactically manage the specific communication and decision-making behaviors during the actual bargaining; and the ability to recognize how one's own personality, value system and perceptions affect the choice of tactics and behavior.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MGMT.3010 Organizational Behavior, preference MG concentrators.

Strategic Management (Formerly MGMT/66.490)

Description

An integration of knowledge in the various functional areas of management toward solution of problems affecting the character and success of the total enterprise. Corporate strategy and its implementation via appropriate policies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: FINA.3010, MKTG.2010, POMS.3010, MGMT.3010, and Senior Level.

Business Applications Development (Formerly 63.330: Application Systems Development, MIST 305)

Description

Introduction to programming and computing. Topics include fundamental programming constructs, data structures, and object orientation. Through hands-on exercises to build business applications, students will learn programming concepts, software development principles, and computational problem-solving skills. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MIST.2010 Mgmt Information Systems, or Instructor permission.

Marketing Analytics (Formerly MKTG 411/62.411/62.312)

Description

Course number was formerly 62.312. Focuses on marketing strategies and tactics. Emphasis is given on research methods and applications for strategy building and implementation. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MKTG.2010 Marketing Principles; preference Marketing concentrators; COM filter courses.

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation (Formerly 36.361)

Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of clinical chemistry laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis is placed on theoretical concepts, instrument components and design, calibration and troubleshooting of modern instrumentation, and analytical methodologies in the clinical laboratory. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative applications of instrumental techniques are covered. Computer applications are included where appropriate. The following spectroscopic instruments are studied: ultraviolet, visible and infra red absorption, fluorescence, turbidimetry and nephelometry, reflectance, flame emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods of analysis are reviewed, including potentiometric techniques, voltammetry and coulometry. Chromatographic instrumentation and methods are discussed, such as column and thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2520 Physiological Chemistry II, or CHEM.1220 Chemistry II, or CHEM.1120 General Chemistry II, and Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences(BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Conducting 1 (Formerly 75.233)

Description

Training in basic baton technique and related study for instrumental and choral conducting.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MUTH 1040 Aural Skills 2, or MUTH 1090 Musicianship & Analysis 2.

Survey: Music Technology (Formerly 78.305)

Description

The use of technology in music listening, performance, analysis, composition, recording and music study will be presented. The dimensions and applications of technology will be discussed as related to aesthetics, the musician's experiences, musical style, and the musical experience. Basic introduction to the technologies of audio recording. Course includes required reading, listening, session participation. Music Majors Only.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MUBU.3010 Music Business 1.

Recording Production (Formerly 78.410)

Description

Intermediate audio production. Planning and executing recording sessions which involve a variety of musical ensembles under diverse recording conditions; live-performance/concert recordings; multi-track recording, overdub, and remix procedures; application of informed musical judgment to the mixing process; and research in recording techniques. Laboratory required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MUSR 3100 Intro To Recording; Co-Reqs: MUSR 3600 Critical Listening, and MUSR 3900 Acoustics & Psychoacoust.

Health Promotion in Nursing Practice Practicum (Formerly 33.309)

Description

This course is a clinical practicum which focuses on the development of interventions to promote the health of individuals and families. This course aims to refine critical thinking skills and analyze nursing's unique contribution to health care. Consideration is given to the interrelationships of theory, research and practice.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: NURS 1030 Academic Strategies Portfolio, NURS 3010 Research in Nursing and Health Care, NURS 3060 Health Assessment, NURS 3070 Concepts for Baccalaureate Nursing and Co-req: NURS 3080 Health Promotion in Nursing Practice.

Health Promotion and Risk Reduction of Families III Practicum (Formerly 33.411)

Description

In this clinical course, students provide nursing care to adults in adult inpatient and outpatient settings. The focus of the experience is the development of specifically tailored therapeutic interventions in providing care to adults with acute and chronic illness.

Prerequisites

Co-Reqs: NURS 4100 Nsg Acute Care, NURS 4120 Com Hlth & Health Policy. Students must be in the School of Nursing UMass Lowell program.

Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies (Formerly PCS 125)

Description

This course will focus on the causes of conflict, conflict resolution methods, and ways to sustain peace. The course will explain and define each of those areas. A mid-term will be administered to examine the students' grasp of the concepts and key terminology. The second part of the class will emphasize student participation and the application of concepts learned earlier in class. The final is a take home exam that will require the application of theory and praxis in the field of Peace and Conflict Studies.

Introduction to Philosophy (Formerly 45.201)

Description

Examines some of the typical approaches to philosophical questioning and the issues raised in such inquiry: what is true knowledge, what is reality, what is the good, what is the right political order, what is the nature of religious faith? Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Introduction to Logic and Critical Reasoning (Formerly 45.202)

Description

Studies the methods used to distinguish correct from incorrect reasoning. This course will aim at developing (1) an ability to express one's ideas clearly and concisely; (2) an increased skill in defining one's terms; and(3) a capacity to formulate arguments vigorously and to scrutinize them critically. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Advanced Experimental Physics Laboratory I (Formerly 96.393)

Description

Some of the most significant experiments in the history of physics are revisited. Form measuring the universal gravity constant to observing the quantization of light and matter, this laboratory course challenges students' experimental skills and tests their understanding of fundamental concepts. Preparing high quality lab reports and presentations is emphasized.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PHYS.2610L The Physics of Materials & Devices, or PHYS.2450L Physics II lab, and PHYS.2620L Principles of Laboratory Automation with a grade of C- or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P".

Nuclear Instrumentation (Formerly 96.406)

Description

This course provides the operating principles and applications of nuclear radiation detection systems, including detector theory, electronic signal processing, and measurement and data reduction techniques. The systems covered include gas-filled detectors (ion chambers, proportional counters, and Geiger-Mueller counters), inorganic and organic scintillators, and high-purity germanium detectors, for the detection of alpha, beta, gamma, and neuron radiation. This course also covers hypothesis testing, detection limits, and detector dead time (offered as 98.506 for graduate credit).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PHYS 2100 Intro Modern Physics and PHYS 2610L The Physics of Materials & Dev or PHYS 2450L Physics III Lab

Process Control (Formerly 26.404)

Description

Basic principles of control systems used with plastics processing equipment. Included are instrumentation, signal conditioning, data acquisition, feedback control, process monitoring, data reduction, and SPC/SQC. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 2340 Differential Equations or MATH 2360 Eng Differential Equations.

Quantitative Methods in Political Science (Formerly 46.301)

Description

This is a course in designing Quantitative Research and applying statistics for Political Scientific. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req:POLI.2010 Research Methods in Pol. Sci.

SMR: Political communication and Media Studies (Formerly 46.422)

Description

Advanced study in contemporary issues in Political Communication and Media Studies.

Service Management (Formerly POMS 403/63.470)

Description

This course is intended to provide students with the necessary tools and understanding for managing service operations. Service firms represent the fastest-growing sector of the economy. This course will focus on the various aspects involved in the management of service operations. The service operations are managed differently to their intangibility, time-sensitivity, high levels of customer involvement and lack of engineering standards. This course will explore topics such as design and delivery of services, the measurement of productivity and quality, managing capacity and demand, redesign of service delivery processes, management of technology, and others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: POMS.3010 Operations Management.

Research III: Laboratory (Formerly 47.375 and PSYC.3750)

Description

An advanced course in which students design and carry out an empirical research project from start to finish, resulting in an individually written research report using APA style and an oral presentation. The primary goal is for students to experience discovery by completing an original study that reasonably extends the prior research literature. Topics may vary, reflecting the interests of the instructor. Students will perform literature reviews; formulate a research question; operationalize variables; develop research designs; obtained ethical review and approval; and collect, analyze, and interpret data. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of the research process in assessments that may include assignments, quizzes, or exams. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.3690 Research II with 'C' or better, Junior/ Senior level and completed 15 credits in Psychology.

Introduction to Biostatistics (Formerly 19.301)

Description

This course covers the basic tools for the entry, analysis, and presentation of data in al areas of public health. Central to these skills is assessing the impact of chance and variability on the interpretation of research findings subsequent recommendations for public health practice and policy. Specific topics include tools for describing central tendency and variability in data; methods for performing inference on population means and proportions; and statistical hypothesis testing. Software will be used to analyze health datasets, including relational databases and create graphical presentations of study results. Coursework will also focus on the interpretation of statistics in the health science literature and other communication.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PUBH.2070 The U.S. Healthcare System, and ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and MATH.1280, or MATH.1310, or MATH.2830, or MATH.3630.

Community Health Assessment (Formerly 31.306 Socio-Ecological Health Assessment)

Description

This course focuses on building health assessment skills of Public Health professionals. The course will introduce students to concepts of Community Health Assessments and guide students to practice skills necessary to conduct them. The course will emphasize the importance of using assessment results to make programmatic and policy decisions and will direct participants in how to communicate findings to allow policymakers, health professionals, and members of the public to take action to improve Public Health. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking/Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PUBH.3011 Program Planning in Health Pro, and HSCI.3400 IPE Research Methods, or PUBH.2060 Research Methods in Public Health, and PUBH.2050 Social Determinants of Health.

Infectious Disease (Formerly PUBH.310)

Description

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of communicable diseases and how humans and the environment affect their distribution and impact. The course will provide an overview of infectious diseases, how these diseases affect humans, vectors and sources of these diseases. The course will also cover infectious disease surveillance, outbreak investigation and response as well as prevention planning and bioterrorism.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.2110 Basic Clinical Microbiology & Pathology, and HSCI.2130 Basic Clinical Microbiology & Pathology Laboratory.

Qualitative Methods for Social Research (Formerly 48.403)

Description

Qualitative research methods. Discusses various strategies employed by qualitative researchers with special emphasis on field research. For majors only. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology; Sociology majors, or permission of instructor.

Advanced French Grammar (Formerly 50.344)

Description

A systematic study of grammatical and syntactical structures. Review of more advanced structures.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 50.211 French 3 and Culture or FRE3 or FRE4 student group waiver.

Advanced French Conversation (Formerly 50.346)

Description

Advanced oral practice in rapid and idiomatic speech. Topics of contemporary significance are selected from contemporary prose.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Advanced French Conversation and Composition (Formerly 50.348)

Description

Designed to improve and reinforce proficiency in spoken and written French through regular exercises of oral communication and free composition, through the analysis of literary texts and authentic written and oral materials. Taught in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Enhancing and Advancing your Knowledge of French (Formerly 50.394)

Description

Designed for students who need/wish to enhance and advance their linguistic skills in French. Conducted entirely in French, the course will focus on the vocabulary of contemporary French as well as selected grammatical and syntactical structures through the analysis of French-speaking Media (newspapers, Radios, TVs) available on the Web.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture or WLFR 3990 Elective.

Introduction to Literary Analysis (Formerly 54.350)

Description

In this course, students examine the various definitions and functions of literary language, and the formal aspects of diverse genre: narrative, poetry and essay. In this course, students also study the concept of literature as aesthetic phenomenon and its socio-cultural implications, through concepts such as author, reader, narrator and discourse, Major authors, themes, and genres from both Latin America and Spain are included, with basic concepts of contemporary literary criticism and theory. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLSP.2120 Spanish 4 and Culture, or WLSP.2040 Intensive Spanish 3 & 4.