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Course Listing for Psychology

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Community Social Psychology) (Formerly 47.500)

Description

Introduces history and contemporary trends of community and social psychology with focus on how social and environmental forces affect individual and group quality of life. This course surveys the history, theoretical frameworks, core values, methods/approaches and orienting concepts in the field.

Prerequisites

Master's program in Community Social Psychology.

Applied Developmental Psychology (Formerly 47.501)

Description

Provides a life span developmental perspective on individual and social adaptation and change. Examines appropriate theory and research, and illustrates the influences of environmental, social and cultural factors.

Seminar in Community Social Psychology (Formerly 47.502)

Description

Offered from time to time to highlight specialized areas of faculty interest and to acquaint the student with new developments from a broad range of current psychological theory and research and how these developments might affect social and community life.

Applied Social Psychology (Formerly 47.503)

Description

Introduces students to social psychology as an applied discipline. Covers such applied topics as attitude change, aggression, helping behavior, attribution, and interpersonal influence.

The Family System (Formerly 47.504)

Description

Studies family processes and the interplay between the family and other social, cultural, and socio-economic systems. Topics include parental roles, changing family structures, racial and ethnic factors, and interactions between family, work, and community.

Psychological Approaches to Child Maltreatment (Formerly 47.509)

Description

The course addresses the painful topic of Child Maltreatment in the context of research on optimal, typical, and unacceptable treatment of children, as maltreatment cannot be considered apart from acceptable and even optimal treatment. The impact of maltreatment on the development of the child from the first growth of physical organs in the prenatal infant through the development of moral reasoning in the adolescent is addressed. Both theories and research will be discussed.

Applied Research Methods (Formerly 47.512)

Description

Considers strengths and limitations of various approaches to community and social psychological research. Develops skills for formulating research questions and translating them into practical study designs. Sensitivity to research ethics as well as research practicality and validity are emphasized. Pre- or Co-requisite: 47.500

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.5000 Intro to Community Soc Psych.

Psychology of Diversity (Formerly 47.522)

Description

This course introduces students to theoretical, philosophical and experiential frameworks for thinking about diversity in our communities and society. It includes an examination of the experiences of diverse groups, especially traditionally oppressed groups and individuals. This course is designed to engage students in a process of introspection and self-examination about issues such as racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. Emphasis will be placed on challenging one's own world view and the way it fits into institutional oppression, as well as the way it may affect our work as community change agents.

Women in the Community (Formerly 47.523)

Description

An examination of women's roles in the home, community, and work place; examines psychological consequences, social structural influences, and options for change. Topics include: housework and childcare; violence against women; work place stratification issues; and women's contributions to their communities.

Workplace Diversity ( Formerly 47.526)

Description

This course will explore the challenges presented by the increasingly diverse workforce within the United States. Students will consider how work groups and organizations can effectively incorporate a diversity of perspectives. Students will consider issues of oppression, discrimination and bias, with particular attention paid to the situation here in the Merrimack Valley. There will also be some focus on personal awareness and the development of skills for addressing diversity concerns.

Immigrant Psychology and Communities (Formerly 47.527)

Description

This course will focus on the immigrant experience and the various immigrant groups in the United States with emphasis on recent immigrants in Lowell and Massachusetts. Theories of acculturation and adaptation to a new cultural environment will be extensively examined in the course. An experiential approach will be integrated throughout the course via the incorporation of guest speakers, films, autobiographies/novels, and food. Students will have ample opportunities to read, reflect, discuss and write about the immigrant experience. As our country is a country of immigrants, this course should have relevance to anyone working in the community.

Working with Groups (Formerly 47.542)

Description

This course uses a community-based approach to working with groups. Guided by an understanding of theoretical principles, students will gain insights about group dynamics and process. Students will develop and apply various skills, including assessment, enhanced communication, conflict resolution, problem solving, decision-making, and evaluation. Emphasis is placed on working within diverse groups, attaining outcomes, and utilizing resources. Organizational, prevention/intervention, and focus groups are examined.

Psychology and Law (Formerly 47.543)

Description

This course focuses on applications of psychological research and practice to the legal system. Drawing from the areas of social, cognitive, developmental, clinical, and neuropsychology, students will critically examine the legal process and compare the law's informal theories of human behavior to what psychologists know on the basis of theories and research. Topics covered include including the practice of scientific jury selection, jury deliberation and decision-making, police interrogations and confessions, use of the polygraph as a lie-detector test, eyewitness testimony, repressed and recovered memories, the use of hypnosis, child witnesses in sex abuse cases, the death penalty, the insanity defense, and the role of psychologists as trial consultants and expert witnesses.

Community and Organizational Change (Formerly 47.545)

Description

A review of skills, techniques, and qualities associated with effective community and organizational interventions. Topics include the possibility and desirability of change, methods for studying change, assessment of needs and resources, visioning and planning, membership recruitment and retention, strategy and tactics, leadership styles, publicizing, funding, advocacy, evaluation techniques, and the personal qualities of the change agent. Both cultural factors and the community context of interventions will be discussed. Application to specific cases will be made. Students will have the opportunity to apply course material to settings outside the classroom.

Grant Writing (Formerly 47.546)

Description

This course will be a hands-on course in grant writing. One of the first lessons that you will learn is that grant writing is only to a small degree about writing. Successful grants emerge from working effectively with others to draw out ideas, capture those ideas to create a program or a plan for research, show how the plan is an appropriate one to respond to the "Request for Proposals", and package those ideas so that they make sense to the people who will review the proposal. Grant writing is increasingly a team building activity. Whether or not you obtain the funding is sometimes less important than the networking and planning that you do as a part of developing a grant proposal.

Prerequisites

Community Social Psychology & Economic Social Regional Development Majors only or permission of instructor/chair.

Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism (Formerly 47.561)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the causes and diagnosis of autism, scientific validation, applied behavior analysis, and ethical treatment. Students also learn to write functional objectives, plan positive reinforcement, and design an applied measurement system in the context of developing Individualized Family Service Plans and Individualized Education plans. The issue of culturally appropriate interventions is addressed Prerequisite: coursework in the psychology of child development, or permission.

Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism for 3rd

Description

This course is for students who took 5610 prior to fall 2014 and who need additional hours to qualify for the BCBA exam. It provides an introduction to the causes and diagnosis of autism, scientific validation, applied behavior analysis, and ethical treatment. Students also learn to write functional objectives, plan positive reinforcement, and design an applied measurement system in the context of developing individualized Family Service Plans and Individualized Education plans. The issue of culturally appropriate interventions in addressed Prerequisite: coursework in the psychology of child development, or permission.

Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism (Formerly 47.562)

Description

This course covers the application of specific behavioral teaching procedures, including prompting, reinforcement, shaping, chaining, error correction and generalization methods, and the development of instructional plans. Emphasis is placed on procedures and plans to teach communication, social, self-help and per-academic skills. Application of such methods in inclusive classroom settings is also considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism.

Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism for 3rd

Description

This course is for students who took 5620 prior to fall 2014 and who need additional hours to qualify for the BCBA exam. This course covers the application of specific behavioral teaching procedures, including prompting, reinforcement, shaping, chaining, error correction and generalization methods, and the development of instructional plans. Emphasis is placed on procedures and plans to teach communication, social, self-help and per-academic skills. Application of such methods in inclusive classroom settings is also considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism, or Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5611 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism for 3rd.

Management Strategies in Applied Behavioral Intervention

Description

This course provides instruction on areas of the 4th edition task list related to ethically providing behavior analytic services as established by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board and codes of conduct for behavior analysts in the field of applied behavior analysis. Building on knowledge of applied behavior analysis and autism gained in the two prerequisite courses, students will enhance their understanding of best practices in the assessment and treatment of individuals diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder and how ABA strategies are implemented and evaluated.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism, and PSYC.5620 Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism.

Measurement and Experimental Design in Behavioral Intervention (Formerly 47.565)

Description

This course provides advanced coverage of measurement methods used in behavioral intervention. It also offers in-depth coverage of the "within-subject" experimental designs commonly used in behavioral research and practice. Component analysis and parametric analysis methods, and ethical considerations in research, are also covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism.

Measurement and Experimental Design in Behavioral Intervention for 3rd

Description

This course is for students who took 5650 prior to Fall 2014 and who need additional hours to qualify for the BCBA exam. This course provides advanced coverage of measurement methods used in behavioral intervention. It also offers in-depth coverage of the "within-subject" experimental designs commonly used in behavioral research and practice. Component analysis and parametric analysis methods, and ethical considerations in research, are also covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism, or Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5611 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism for 3rd.

Functional Analysis and Treatment of Challenging Behavior (Formerly 47.566)

Description

This course covers the purpose, rationale and methods used in conducting and interpreting functional analyses of challenging, or "maladaptive", behaviors (self-injury, stereotypy, aggression). It also describes the full range of behavioral procedures used to decrease or eliminate these behaviors, with emphasis placed on ethical interventions and the desirability of least restrictive and non-aversive strategies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5620 Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism.

Functional Analysis and Treatment of Challenging Behavior for 3rd

Description

This course is for students who took 5660 prior to Fall 2014 and who need additional hours to qualify for the BCBA exam. This course covers the purpose, rationale and methods used in conducting and interpreting functional analyses of challenging, or "maladaptive", behaviors (self-injury, sterotypy, aggression). It also describes the full range of behavioral procedures used to decrease or eliminate these behaviors, with emphasis placed of ethical interventions and the desirability of least restrictive and non-aversive strategies.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5620 Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism, or Permission of graduate coordinator.

Behavioral Intervention Program Models in Autism (Formerly 47.568)

Description

This course explores how educational environments can be designed to maximize learning. Different models of effective, evidence-based behavioral intervenions are analyzed. The use of teaching activity schedules and staff training to build supportive educational settings is also covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5620 Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism.

Behavioral Intervention Program Models in Autism for 3rd

Description

This course is for students who took 5680 prior to Fall 2014 who need additional hours to qualify for the BCBA exam. This course explores how educational environments can be designed to maximize learning. Different models of effective, evidence-based behavioral interventions are analyzed. The use of teaching activity schedules and staff training to build supportive educational settings is also covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5620 Teaching and Positive Behavioral Support in Autism, or Permission of graduate coordinator.

Autism and Developmental Psychopathology (Formerly 47.571)

Description

This course is designed to explore Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) in the developing person and in changing social contexts (e.g.,family, school, employment) across development. An empirical and theoretical review of developmental transformations and reorganizations across the lifespan provides the basis for examining biological, social, psychological, and cultural contributions to the continuity and discontinuity of both adaptive and maladaptive processes over time as well as an analysis of individual and environmental risk and protective factors across development. Special attention is given to the changing competencies and challenges of developmental periods and their role in the assessment, display, meaning, and implications of ASDs from infancy through adulthood.

Legal and Ethical Issues in Professional Practice (Formerly 47.572)

Description

This course will explore the legal and ethical issues facing professionals working with individuals diagnosed with disabilities, particularly those on the autism spectrum. The goal is to provide behavior analysts and other professionals the opportunity to develop skills in dealing with the complex legal and ethical issues that arise when working in human service fields.

Prerequisites

.Pre-req: PSYC 5650 Measurement and Experimental Design in Behavioral Intervention, or PSYC.5660 Functional Analysis and Treatment of Challenging Behaviors.

Community and Social Interventions in Autism (Formerly 47.574)

Description

This course will focus on current perspectives of community-based programming for individuals on the autism spectrum, particularly among the adolescent and adult age range. We will overview the challenges experienced by those with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during adolescence and adulthood, and consider the issues involved in designing, implementing, and evaluating social and community interventions for this population.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: PSYC.5610 Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism.

Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis

Description

This course is designed to provide students with foundational knowledge regarding the basic concepts and principles of behavior analysis. Students will gain an introduction to what behavior analysis is and how it differs from other approaches that study behavior. Students will be asked to define and identify examples of the basic principles, then apply that knowledge to describe and diagram original, real-world examples. Students will look at how the environment promotes the development of both adaptive and maladaptive behaviors, shapes behavior over time, and how the environment can be modified to help change behavior.

Measurement and Experimental Design

Description

This course provides advanced coverage of the measurement methods that are important to the effective use of applied behavior analysis. It also offers in-depth coverage of the "within-subject: experimental designs commonly used in behavioral research and practice. Component analysis and parametric analysis methods, and social validity and generalization considerations in research, are also covered.

Prerequisites

Pre or Co-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis.

Philosophical Underpinnings of Behavior Analysis

Description

This course will focus on the scientific and philosophical underpinnings of behavior analysis. In this course, students will review basic assumptions about the nature of behavior, including comparison of the philosophical positions of free will and determinism. Emphasis will be placed on verbal behavior and the problems that can arise when practitioners are confronted wit mentalistic explanations of behavior. Students also will explore complex conceptual issues, such as knowledge and understanding, purpose and intention, problem-solving, reasoning, creativity, culture, ethics, and rights and values, in ways that illustrate how they are important to everyday life. The historical perspective of how radical behaviorism evolved, and how it compare to other conceptual systems will be reviewed.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis.

Behavioral Assessment

Description

This course covers the assessment of behaviors and skills. We will review many types of assessments used in applied behavior analysis and the reliability of these common assessments. Specific topics to be covered include functional behavior assessments, functional analysis, preference and reinforcement assessments, skill assessments, identification of goals, how to write goals, and the development of a treatment plan. Emphasis will be placed on the use of assessments to inform treatment.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis, and PSYC.5820 Measurement and Experimental Design.

Professional and Ethical Issues in Behavior Analysis

Description

This course will explore the legal and ethical issues facing professionals working with individuals diagnosed with disabilities, particularly those on the autism spectrum. The goal is to provide behavior analysts and other professionals the opportunity to develop skills in dealing with the complex legal and ethical issues that arise when working in human service fields.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis.

Community Service Learning (1, 2, or 3 credits) (Formerly 47.486/586)

Description

Students will take an applied role in the community where they will have the opportunity to provide some form of meaningful service to individuals, groups or communities. Students will meet regularly with a designated faculty member on campus to consider their experiences in the context of current psychological thought. In some instances, the commitment to community service may extend over the course of a full year. Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. 1, 2 or 3 credits. This course may be repeated but no more than 12 credits total from any combination of PSYC.4860, PSYC.4880 and PSYC.4910 may be counted toward the degree.

Behavior Change Procedures

Description

This course covers the design and application of behavior change procedures commonly used by behavior analysts. We will review the importance of cultural considerations and ongoing monitoring of progress. Specific topics to be covered include reinforcement, antecedent manipulations, transfer of stimulus control, and programming for maintenance and generalization. Emphasis will be placed on procedures used for skill acquisition including social, communication, self-help, and academic skills.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis, and PSYC.5820 Measurement and Experimental Design, and PSYC.5840 Behavioral Assessment.

Advanced Cognition

Description

This course will provide an advanced overview of the scientific study of mental processes. Specifically, we will read a number of experimental and review articles that describe or contribute significant advancements to our understanding of memory, decision-making, language, attention, perception, etc. Readings will be critically evaluated and synthesized through discussions and a variety of in-class review activities, with particular emphasis on the role of cognition in a broader human context.

Implementation and Supervision Practices in Behavior Analysis

Description

This course covers implementation of simpler to more complex behavior change procedures and the management and supervision of the staff who implement those procedures. We will review the importance of ethical and safety considerations, data analysis to monitor progress and problem-solve any lack of progress, and initial staff training and ongoing supervision of staff. Specific topics to be covered include reinforcement procedures to impact behavior, positive and negative punishment, group contingencies and programming for maintenance and generalization of behavior changes, staff training and supervision effectiveness. Emphasis will be placed on procedures used for behavior reduction and socially-valid replacement behaviors as well as best practices in personnel management and supervision.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis, and PSYC.5820 Measurement and Experimental Design, and PSYC.5840 Behavioral Assessment.

Professional Seminar in Applied Behavior Analysis

Description

A monthly meeting for students in the ABA option of the Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Studies graduate program designed to address questions related to the supervised practicum experience. Student will be required to be in a setting accruing fieldwork experience under the supervision of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.5810 Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis, and PSYC.5820 Measurement and Experimental Design, and PSYC.5840 Behavioral Assessment, and Graduate Student in the Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Studies Program.

Program Evaluation (Formerly 47.611)

Description

A skill-oriented approach that considers both formative and summative evaluation techniques. Emphasizes mastery of the technical aspects of the evaluation process, and includes consideration of the importance of program evaluation in community psychology, health, education, etc.

Advanced Community Dynamics: Lowell (Formerly 47.625)

Description

An examination of principles that influence community structure, function, and evolution over time. Students will learn how community patterns and activities can best be understood and how community problems and concerns can best be addressed, employing psychological and other conceptual frameworks and perspectives. Specific emphasis will be placed on the historic and diverse city of Lowell. Prerequisites: 47.500 and 47.512.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 5000 Intro to Community Soc Psych and PSYC 5120 Applied Research Methods.

Capstone Practicum I in Community Social Psychology (Formerly 47.6310)

Description

Provides supervised field experience in a setting appropriate to the student's area of specialization, plus on-campus class meetings. An average of approximately ten hours of fieldwork in an approved setting for two consecutive semesters is required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC 5000 Intro to Community Soc Psych, and PSYC 5120 Applied Res Methods; Pre-Req/Co-Req: PSYC 6250 Adv Community Dynamics:Lowell.

Capstone Practicum II in Community Social Psychology(Formerly 47.632)

Description

Continuation of PSYC.6310, which is pre-requisite.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.6310 Practicum I.

Theories of Change in Applied Psychology (Formerly 47.640)

Description

Examines major theories of development and change relevant to Applied Psychology; and discusses the use of theories in posing and answering research questions.  A major focus of research and practice is on understanding and promoting change (in structures, functions and processes of cognition, emotion, behavior and relationships) over time.  In this course, students will examine major theories of change (development, therapeutic and school/community/contextual change), learn to place these theories in comparative, historical and philosophical context, examine efforts in theory integration, and test the direct relevance of theories to posing and answering their own research questions.

Fundamentals of Prevention Science

Description

This graduate course will examine theoretical, empirical, and practical foundations of prevention science for designing and evaluating diverse interventions to prevent human social problems and promote healthy development. The seminar will cover the origins and multidisciplinary roots of prevention science, key concepts, current trends and directions, theoretical approaches, program theory, methodology, research to practice, policy development, and dissemination. Special consideration will be given to conceptual issues in the field such as prevention versus promotion, stages of program development, scaling up, methodological approaches such as randomized controlled trials, quasi-experiments, process and impact assessment, cost-benefit analysis, statistical methodology, dissemination.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.6400 Theories of Change in Applied Psychology.

Advanced Quantitative Methods(Formerly 47.700/PSYC.7000)

Description

This course is designed to provide an overview of the most widely used methods employed by psychologists and other behavioral scientists. You will learn about the common research tools and strategies that psychologists' use in the production of knowledge. The course will provide you with a basic understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the various research strategies used by psychologists so that you can become an informed consumer of research both in the behavioral sciences and the media. In addition, you will begin to develop and practice a set of research skills that will prepare you for advanced study in the behavioral sciences.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PSYC.6400 Theories of Change in Applied Psychology, or Permission of Instructor.

Experimental Analysis of Behavior (Formerly 47.663)

Description

This course will explore the basic principles of the experimental analysis of behavior and their application to an understanding of learning. Emphasis will be placed on the historical underpinnings of the field, the methods of analysis, and current issues in the field.

Supervised Practicum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism: I (Formerly 47.671)

Description

The practicum sequence of courses is required of all Master of Science in Autism Studies students, whether they have opted for the Fieldwork or University Intensive Practicum option for accumulating supervised experience hours. In this first of a 3-course sequence, students will gain experience in applying behavioral principles and methods to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder or other appropriate populations. All students must have an off-site, approved placement from 10 to 30 hours per week, as determined by BACB requirements; the placement must include direct work with clients. Class time will be used to discuss treatment and analysis strategies in the context of individual cases with which the student is involved during their on-site placement.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ASPP 5610 ASPP 5620 and Co-req: ASPP 5660 Func. Analysis &Treat. of Challenging Behaviors, Matriculated status and Completion of at least 18 grad. credits in Psych./Autism Studies with a GPA of 3.0 or better.

Supervised Practicum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism:II (Formerly 47.672)

Description

In this second of a 3-course sequence, students will gain experience in applying behavioral principles and methods to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder or other appropriate populations. All students must have an off-site, approved placement from 10 to 30 hours per week, as determined by BACB requirements; the placement must include direct work with clients. Class time will be used to discuss treatment and analysis strategies in the context of individual cases with which the student is involved during their on-site placement.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.6710 Introductory Supervised Practicum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism.

Supervised Practicum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism: III (Formerly 47.673)

Description

In this third of a 3-course sequence, students will gain experience in applying behavioral principles and methods to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder or other appropriate populations. All students must have an off-site, approved placement from 10 to 30 hours per week, as determined by BACB requirements; the placement must include direct work with clients. Class time will be used to discuss treatment and analysis strategies in the context of individual cases with which the student is involved during their on-site placement.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 47.672 Intermediate Supervised Practicum in Behavioral Intervention in Autism.

Seminar in Health Psychology

Description

This course focuses on the application of psychological principals to the subspecialty of health psychology. Students will learn about the major topics in health psychology, including health behaviors, stress and health, health moderators, and prevention. Students will be exposed to psychological theories and research methodologies used in health psychology, and to current literature in the field.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Graduate status and previous coursework in community psychology and research methods strongly recommended.

Health Campaigns: Effects and Processes (Formerly 47.681)

Description

The intent of this course is to provide the student with a thorough understanding of the effects and processes of health campaigns -- including theoretical foundations, empirical findings, and practical applications. The emphasis will be on applying this information to diverse aspects of human health, including individual physical and mental health as well as the broader fabric of public health and societal functioning. As the course evolves, students will apply and extend the course concepts through critical analysis of existing health campaigns and through the design of a proposed campaign of their choosing.

Directed Study in Community and Social Psychology (Formerly 47.691)

Description

This course is designed as an independent study under the supervision of a member of the department of a subject not offered in the standard curriculum.

Directed Study in Autism (47.692)

Description

This course is designed as an independent study under the supervision of a member of the department of a subject not offered in the standard curriculum.

Directed Study in Applied Psychology and Prevention Science (Formerly 47.693)

Description

Designed as an independent study under faculty supervision in a topic not offered elsewhere in the curriculum.

Mentored Research Experience

Description

Students will take an applied role in faculty-supervised research, with prior approval of primary advisor, where they provide a meaningful contribution to a faculty member's research program or particular study. Students will be involved in various stages of the research process, including literature review, research design, procedures, data collection, entry, and/or analysis. Activities will be substantive enough for the students to earn co-authorship in research dissemination, including research papers, presentations, and policy briefs. Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory, 3 credits or 6 credits. This course may be repeated but no more than 12 credits total from an combination of PSYC.6930, PSYC.6940, PSYC.6950 may be counted toward the degree.

Applied Field Research

Description

Students will work in an applied setting, with prior approval of primary advisor, where they will have the opportunity to perform various research tasks, including grant writing, needs assessments, gaps analyses, and provide evidence-based workshops and training to staff and community members at the applied setting. these activities may culminate in research papers, presentations, policy briefs. Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory, 3 credits or 6 credits. This course may be repeated but no more than 12 credits total from any combination of PSYC.6930, PSYC.6940, PSYC.6950 may be counted toward the degree.

Narrative Methods (Formerly 47.701)

Description

Narrative refers to real or imaginary events related often by means of language, but also by means of pictures, songs, and dance. Narrative often involves a sequence of events, representation of the meaning of those events, and description of the context in which they occurred. Narrative is the primary means by which we make sense of our experiences and represent ourselves to and develop intimacy with others. There are important documented differences in narration due to culture, cognition, emotion, age, and gender. To adequately analyze narration requires expertise in a wide variety of analytic methods and is the overarching goal of this course.

Selected Topics in Applied Psychology and Prevention Science (Formerly 47.703)

Description

Presents a careful consideration of selected topics in the area of Applied Psychology and Prevention Science.

Intro to Structural Equation Modeling

Description

introduction to basic concepts, principles, and applications of structural equation modeling including path analysis, confirmatory latent variable models, multiple-group modeling, and latent growth curve modeling. Students will learn how to use these techniques in relation to various examples of social science research data.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CRIM.6900 Advanced Regression Analysis, or PUBH.6890 Advanced Regression Modeling, or permission of instructor.

Master's Project in Autism

Description

For master's graduate students actively engaged in a research or intervention-based project leading to the submission of a written project report. A program of supervised study will be arranged between the student and a faculty supervisor. This course may be repeated once. Permission of instructor.

Master's Project in Community-Social Psychology (Formerly 47.733)

Description

For graduate students actively engaged in developing a change-oriented intervention leading to the submission of a written project report. A program of supervised study will be arranged between the student and a faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: Approval of major advisor.

Master's Thesis in Community Social Psychology (Formerly 47.743)

Description

For graduate students actively engaged in research leading toward the submission of a written thesis. A program of supervised work will be arranged between the student and a faculty supervisor. This course may be repeated for credit, but only a total of 6 credits may be counted toward the Master's degree. Prerequisite: 47.500 and 47.512 and permission of the faculty member who will supervise the thesis.

Master's Thesis in Autism Studies (Formerly 47.744)

Description

For graduate students actively engaged in research leading toward the submission of a written thesis. A program of supervised work will be arranged between the student and faculty supervisor. This course may be repeated for credit, but only a total of 6 credits may be counted toward the Master's degree. Prerequisite: 47.512 and 47.561 and permission of the faculty member who will supervise the thesis.

Prerequisites

Pre-req:PSYC 5120 Applied Research Methods, and ASPP 5610 Intro. to Behavioral Intervention in Autism, And completion of at least 18 graduate credits in psychology/autism studies with a GPA of 3.0 or better.

Master's Thesis in Community Social Psychology (Formerly 47.746)

Description

For graduate students actively engaged in research leading toward the submission of a written thesis. A program of supervised work will be arranged between the student and a faculty supervisor. Only a total of 6 credits may be counted toward the Master's degree. Prerequisite: 47.500 and 47.512 and permission of the faculty member who will supervise the thesis.

Dissertation (Formerly 47.763)

Description

Faculty supervision of doctoral dissertation.