All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into SiS.


Paper Industry Processes (Formerly 10.501)

Description

Processes of fiber separation from raw materials, fiber purification and mechanical processing of fiber and sheet formation. Chemical engineering theory is applied to the analysis of these operations.

Principles of Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.502)

Description

Introduction to the field of chemical engineering and solution of problems involving units and dimensions, mass balances, flow sheets and gas relationships.

Colloidal, Interfacial and Nanomaterials Science and Engineering (Formerly 10.506)

Description

Unifying principle and the three main classes of colloids (dispersions, macromolecular solutions and micelles) are considered. Topics covered include surface tension, work and energy, effect of surface curvature, zeta potential, surface activity and diverse applications of interest to chemical engineers.

Material Science and Engineering (Formerly 10.508)

Description

An advanced overview of solid materials that are likely to be considered for engineering applications in, or be produced by the chemical process industries. They will be discussed from the viewpoints of their unit cell structures, appropriate phase diagrams, their chemical and physical attributes, and the association of these to end use applications. Discussion of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. For Non-UML graduates.

Advanced Separation Processes (Formerly 10.510)

Description

This course emphasizes separation processes requiring a rate analysis for adequate understanding, which includes most of the newer separation methods of industrial importance such as membrane, sorption and chromatographic separations. Unifying fundamental relations and concepts are emphasized. Graphical and numerical design procedures are covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 10.310 Separation Process with Mass Transfer, or permission of Instructor.

Industrial Chemistry (Formerly 10.512)

Description

Survey of the major sources and uses of chemicals, industrial chemical processes, fundamental raw materials, and career paths available in the chemical industry. More intensive treatment of selected industrial processes with emphasis of green/sustainable chemical processes.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CHEM 1220 Chemistry II and CHEM 2220 Organic Chemistry IIA.

Microprocessor Control (Formerly 10.518)

Description

Single board computers and single chip controllers and how they are used in chemical process control .Programming methods for using minicomputers as process controllers; interfacing requirements and communications. Laboratory projects include both software and hardware.

Advanced Thermodynamics (Formerly 10.520)

Description

Classical and statistical thermodynamics are applied to develop procedures for obtaining estimates of equilibrium properties required for chemical process design. An introduction to surface energy as an important parameter in the processing of colloids, especially in the nanometer size range, will also be undertaken.

Chemical Process Design (Formerly 10.522)

Description

Process synthesis, definition, and characterization. Introduction to modular process simulation packages such as ASPEN PLUS, Recycle and tear stream analysis. Stream convergence, Unit operations models, Flow sheet manipulation. Data records and physical property estimation techniques.

Nanodevices and Electronics Materials Processing (Formerly 10.523)

Description

Materials processing methods in electronics and related industries; crystal contamination control, growth, diffusion, etching, epitaxy, ion implantation, lithography, and other topics.

Self Assembly and Nanotechnology (Formerly 10.524)

Description

This course will describe two of the most fast-growing area/fields with both fundamental importance and practical relevance: self-assembly and nanotechnology. The first half of the course will discuss the theories and applications of self-assembly phenomena. The second half will focus on nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

Advanced Kinetics and Reactor Design (Formerly 10.526)

Description

The course will cover advanced chemical reaction kinetics, rate laws and reactor design with an emphasis on heterogeneous and catalytic reaction systems involving interphase and mass transfer effects.

Advanced Transport Phenomena (Formerly 10.528)

Description

An advanced study of the mechanisms of the transport processes. Transport equations are developed from both microscopic and macroscopic viewpoints. Analogies and similarities between the transport processes are discussed. Considerable emphasis is placed upon solutions to problems.

Recent Advances in Nanotechnology and Green Chemistry (Formerly 10.529)

Description

This course is designed to expose students to a variety of concepts in chemistry and challenge them to think critically about experiments used to interrogate these concepts. Organic polymer chemistry with an emphasis on electronically conducting polymers will be the main area of focus. Students would first be introduced to scientific subject matter outside their realm of familiarity and be expected to identify new concepts and links to existing experimental paradigms. The course is divided into 3 parts: (i)introduction to nanothehnology and green chemistry with a focus on nanoscale electronic polymers, (ii) green chemistry and the overlap area with nanotechnology, and (iii) green engineering.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CHEM 1210 Chemistry I, or equivalent.

Advanced Control Strategies (Formerly 10.530)

Description

An introduction to computer control and to some of the common control strategies applied to the design of complex chemical process control systems.

Principles of Chemical Engineering II (Formerly 10.532)

Description

Continuation of Principles of Chemical Engineering including real gas relationships, humidity,energy balances, and combined mass-energy balance systems. Introduction to the first law of thermodynamics. Note: Non-majors only.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 10:502 Principles of Chem Engineering.

Macromolecular Colloidal Science and Engineering (Formerly 10.533)

Description

This course treats both synthetic and natural macromolecules (i.e., polymers, and biopolymers), Interrelating synthesis commercial manufacture, molecular, macroscopic and application properties as well as the colloidal nature of their solutions. Pertinent fundamental principles are reviewed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: CHEN.5060 Colloidal, Interfacial & Nanomaterials Science and Engineering or permission of Instructor.

Industrial Bioprocessing

Description

Students will learn principles and concepts of industrial bioprocessing. The course covers key concepts and practices of upstream, downstream and analytical bioprocessing technologies. In addition, recent FDA initiatives of Process Analytical Technology (PAT), Quality by Design, and Emerging Technologies will be covered. The course consists of 14 modules. Each module will cover subject matter provided by industry experts.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL.2100 Biology for Engineers, and CHEN.3100 Separation Processes with Mass Transfer, and CHEN.4030 Chemical Reaction Engineering, or Permission of Instructor.

Cell and Microbe Cultivation (Formerly 10.535)

Description

This course presents the principles of biochemical engineering with an emphasis on the unit operation of cell cultivation for production of commercially important products, especially biopharmaceuticals. The bioreactor is viewed as a device for controlling the environment of recombinant and traditional cultures. Major topics include media design, kinetics of growth and production, expression systems, bioreactor types, cell physiology, and bioprocess economics.

Nanomaterials Characterization I (Formerly 10.537)

Description

This lecture course will provide an in-depth introduction to the principles, instrumentation and applications of most common nanomaterial characterization techniques. Nanomaterial imaging, physical, chemical, and optical property analyses are the main focus of this class. Topics covered will include: electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), scanned prove microscopy (AFM), elemental analysis (EDX/XPS), crystal structure analysis (XRD/SAED), thermal analysis (DSC/TGA), laser based characterization (LSCM/DLS/Raman), chromatographic methods (GC), infrared spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry. The analytical and quantitative applications of these techniques for investigating different types of nanomaterials will also be described. Lab demonstrations will be included in lectures.

Advanced Separations in Biotechnology (Formerly 10.538)

Description

This course provides in depth analysis of the two methods used most often in Bioseparations, filtration and chromatography. For both techniques, basic concepts are reviewed. Membrane, depth, sterile and tangential flow filtration, as well as ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and hydroxyapetite chromatography are considered. The emphasis for both methods is on specific applications, scale-up, validation and cleaning

Mathematical Methods for Engineers (Formerly 10/24.539)

Description

Ordinary and partial differential equations, linear algebra, matrix/vector calculus, numerical methods, introduction to optimization methods, and other topics as time permits. Both analytical and numerical techniques are integrated to give good analytical skills coupled with practical problem solving tools. Extensive computer work with the MATLAB package is required. (Same as 24.539).

Nanomaterials Characterization I (Formerly 10.540)

Description

This lecture course will provide an in-depth introduction to the principles, instrumentation and applications of most common nanomaterial characterization techniques. Nanomaterial imaging, physical, chemical, and optical property analyses are the main focus of this class. Topics covered will include: electron microscopy (SEM/TEM), scanned probe microscopy (AFM), elemental analysis (EDX/XPS), crystal structure analysis (XRD/SAED), thermal analysis (DSC/TGA), laser based characterization (LSCM/DLS/Raman), chromatographic methods (GC), infrared spectroscopy, UV/Vis spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry,. The analytical and quantitative applications of these techniques for investigating different types of nanomaterials will also be described. Lab demonstrations will be included in lectures.

Nanomaterials Characterization II (Formerly 10.541)

Description

This hands-on laboratory course will cover the practical aspects of light, electron and scanned probe microscopy techniques discussed in Nanomaterials Characterization I (10.540). A variety of nanomaterials samples systems will be characterized using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The laboratory experiments will provide practical experience in sample preparation techniques, optimization of instrumental conditions for imaging and spectroscopy, and data analysis and interpretation. Students will work on individual term projects involving real-world samples that are of interest to them, and use the techniques they learned in the course to characterize their samples.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEN.5370 Nanomaterials Characterization I

Formulation of Biotherapeutics (Formerly 10.544)

Description

Biotherapeutics, particularly antibodies, are currently the fastest growing pharmaceuticals. Ideally, biotherapeutics are formulated in aqueous solutions and are often a great challenge due physical and chemical stability issues. This course addresses the latest trends and challenges in biologics formulation with a focus on the important role of preformulation in understanding the biological molecule itself for greater "formulatability" and "developability". The course will feature interactive discussions on early formulation screening, thorough biophysical and analytical characterization, improving the feedback loop in the early formulation-development interface, overcoming aggregation and other heterogeneity challenges, and improving overall product profile, In addition, the course will also cover an optimization of the formulation process through rational iterative approach and in-depth case studies, As a whole, this course focuses on providing you with additional tools and knowledge to help streamline solutions to formulation and stability issues for biologics.

Isolation and Purification (Formerly 81.545)

Description

Efficient isolation and purification of biological products, especially proteins, from complex natural mixtures.

Engineering Process Analytics (Formerly 10.548)

Description

This course covers multivariate statistical data analysis and experimental design. Students will learn how to extract information by analyzing various engineering datasets, and how to generate information-rich datasets via minimum experiments. Software for data analysis and experimental design will be utilized during tutorial and practice.

Biomedical Applications of Nanotechnology (Formerly 10.550)

Description

The course will aim to give students an introduction to the applications of nanotechnology in biomedicine. The course will cover the basics of nanomaterials including synthesis and characterization, use of nanotheranostics platforms for drug delivery and imaging, nanomaterials for tissue engineering; nanobiodevices and nanotoxicology. The course is designed for graduate students in the Chemical Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering/Biotechnology programs as well as seniors in Chemical Engineering.

Directed Study: Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.552)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Biopharmaceutical Regulatory Compliance (Formerly 10.555)

Description

This course examines the regulatory framework in which "drugs", biologics" and "cellular therapies" are evaluated in the United States, including the laws, regulations and the state of industrial practice.

Materials for Aerospace and Energy Applications (Formerly 10.556)

Description

Material requirements for emerging applications in aerospace and energy sectors will be discussed. Mechanical, thermal and electrical and barrier properties of filled polymers and polymer nanocomposites will be studied. The effect of resin structure, filler additives, reactive diluents on the resulting properties will be reviewed. Scale-up issues will be studied using basic principles of chemical engineering.

Biotechnology Processing Projects Laboratory (Formerly 10.586)

Description

Development of manufacturing processes for the products of biotechnology are followed through a series of process unit operations. Following the synthesis, purification and formulation of a specific enzyme throughout the course, students examine interactions between process steps and evaluate the impact of each on the total production process. As a final project, students assume the role of project team leader, developing a commercial-scale production process for the enzyme.

Cooperative Education (Formerly 10.593)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Seminar (Formerly 10.601)

Description

Required for all graduate students.

Graduate Seminar (Formerly 10.602)

Description

Required for all graduate students.

Nanoscale Transport Phenomena for Manufacturing Nanodevices (Formerly 10.650)

Description

An interdisciplinary course taught by faculty from the Chemical, Mechanical and Plastics Engineering Departments, who have special knowledge in nanoscale fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The course on nanoscale transport phenomena constitutes a bridge between existing fluid and heat transfer courses in multiple disciplines and emerging nanoscale science and engineering concepts to reflect the forefront of nanomanufacturing. The course is designed to incorporate recent advances in manufacturing polymer-based nanodevices. Key issues of the implementation and maintenance costs for fabrication will be addressed. Hands-on laboratory experiments will be performed to complement the lectures with the ultimate goal of designing and building a complete nanodevice at the end of the course. The course will prepare graduates for employment focused on designing and manufacturing nano/microfluidic systems, lab-on-a-chip devices, electronics devices, medical devices, and other emerging technologies.

Special Projects in Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.720)

Description

Special projects undertaken by a student to expand his/her knowledge in specific fields related to his/her master's project.

Graduate Project - Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.733)

Description

Advanced research project required of students electing non-thesis option performed under the supervision of a senior faculty member in the Chemical Engineering Program. The project must be approved by an examining committee and the Department Chairperson.

Graduate Project - Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.736)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Thesis Review (Formerly 10.741)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Master's Thesis - Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.743)

Description

Advanced research work required of students electing thesis option performed under the supervision of a senior faculty member in the Chemical Engineering Program. The thesis must be approved by an examining committee and the Department Chairperson.

Master's Thesis - Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.746)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Dissertation Review (Formerly 10.750)

Description

Doctoral Dissertation Review

Doctoral Dissertation/Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.753)

Description

Advanced research work required of students performed under the supervision of a senior faculty member in the Chemical Engineering Program. The dissertation topic must be approved by the doctoral committee.

Doctoral Dissertation/Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.756)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Dissertation/Chemical Engineering (Formerly 10.759)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Continued Grad Research (Formerly 10.761)

Description

Continued Grad Research

Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering (Formerly 24/10.331)

Description

Overviews a variety of fundamental nuclear science and engineering concepts that form the basis for most contemporary nuclear technology applications Course topics include concepts from basic atomic and nuclear physics, modern physics, nuclear models and nuclear stability considerations, basic nuclear reactions and the conservation laws that govern these interactions, various radioactive decay processed, and the interaction of neutrons and gamma rays with matter. The energy dependence of neutron and gamma cross sections, the slowing down process, the computation of microscopic and macroscopic reactions rates, and the characterization of different materials used in a variety of nuclear applications are also addressed. A variety of practical applications are highlighted.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MATH 2340 Differential Equations or MATH 2360 Eng Differential Equations.

Energy Engineering Workshop (Formerly 24.504)

Description

A group/individual design project. The design effort will integrate many aspects of the student's engineering background, including design concepts, technical analyses, economic and safety considerations, etc. A formal report and oral presentation are required.

Reactor Physics (Formerly 24.505)

Description

Advanced treatment of several topics in reactor physics, including cross sections and processing methods, development of transport theory, reduction to diffusion theory, and analyses of analytical and numerical solutions of the resultant balance equations.

Reactor Engineering and Safety (Formerly 24.507)

Description

Modeling and analysis of reactor thermal-hydraulics and safety systems. Topics include nuclear heat generation and transport, single and two-phase flow, boiling crisis, and safety analysis.

Dynamic Systems Analysis (Formerly 24.509)

Description

Mathematical foundation using the state-variable approach. Topics include matrix methods, Laplace and Fourier transforms, transfer functions, frequency response and stability analyses, and distributed/lumped parameter systems. Applications to mechanical and thermo-fluid systems. Modeling and simulation of systems using Matlab are emphasized. A comprehensive project, including formal written and oral reports, is required.

Nuclear Fuel Cycle (Formerly 24.510)

Description

This course will explore the various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. The nuclear fuel cycle is broadly classified into three stages; front end, service stage, and back end. The course will introduce students to the various sub stages within the three broad stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. The course will explore the technology that is currently being used in these stages, then compare difference in approaches. Further modifications to the fuel cycle management will be discussed to make nuclear energy more sustainable. The course will provide an overview of front end fuel cycle including: mining, milling, enriching, fabrication; back end of the fuel cycle including: waste and recycling (or not); and in core fuel management, burnup calculations; and approaches to balance the cost of electricity production using nuclear reactors. The students will be introduced to nuclear burnup code such as ORIGEN. At the conclusion of the course students will be tasked to design and evaluate an aspect of the nuclear cycle that has been discussed in the class including but not limited to: enrichment plant, in-core fuel management, spent fuel management.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGY.3310 Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering.

Chemical and Nuclear Waste (Formerly 24.514)

Description

History of nuclear waste disposal; engineering design of disposal systems. Present status of waste and the character and quantities of future wastes. Review of disposal concepts on a generic basis. The national plan for waste disposal.

Radiation Shielding and Protection (Formerly 24.516)

Description

This course will explore the fundamental principles of the interaction of nuclear and atomic radiation with matter and the transport of radiation through materials. The students will learn characterization of radiation fields and sources, and transport radiation through material. The course will discuss radiation exposure, dose, dose equivalent in context of radiation shielding and protection. Consequently, the students will compile each of these topics to learn how to design and analyze radiation shielding and protection. The students will learn how to use both the SOURCES and ORIGEN (or equivalent) code systems for calculating radiation sources and the MCNP (or equivalent) code system for the transport of radiation. At the conclusion of the course the students are expected to develop a shielding design for a given constraints typically encountered in the nuclear field.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGY.3310 Fundamentals of Nuclear Science and Engineering.

Reactor Operator Training (Formerly 24.519)

Description

Training, including in-reactor experience and topical lectures, as given to Reactor Operator Trainees who will undergo Federal testing for a Reactor Operator License.

Reactor Operator Training (Formerly 24.520)

Description

Continuation of 24.519. Upon completion of this course, the student will be given a simulated Reactor Operator examination, including a written test, an oral test about reactor systems, and a controls manipulation test.

Selected Topics in Engineering (Formerly 24.531)

Description

Special problems in nuclear science and engineering assigned to the individual student, with emphasis on modern research methods and preparation of results for publication.

Selected Topics: Energy Science (Formerly 24.532)

Description

Special problems in nuclear science and engineering assigned to the individual student, with emphasis on modern research methods and preparation of results for publication.

Fundamentals of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (Formerly 24.534)

Description

This course will include technical and policy matters related to nuclear security and safeguards. The students will explore in interplay between technical and social science disciplines. Students will be introduced to fundamental nuclear physics and engineering, material science, risk assessment, computational techniques, modeling and simulation, information technology, measurement techniques, and detector development Those technical disciplines will be combined with social science fields such as political science, international relations, international law, energy policies, and regional studies.

Reactor Experiments (Formerly 24.536)

Description

A laboratory-based course using the U Mass Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) to illustrate, validate, and expand upon a mix of topics from reactor core physics, reactor operations, and balance-of-plant/energy removal considerations in nuclear systems. Typical experiments may include an approach to critical demo, reactivity measurements, generation of blade worth curves, analysis of various reactor kinetics and dynamic scenarios (including temperature and xenon effects), measurement of axial flux profiles and temperature/void coefficients, analysis of loss of flow and other pump transients, etc. Matlab will be used for data analysis and for reactor simulation. Other analysis tools such as VENTURE, MCNP, or PARET using existing models of the UMLRR may also be used. Comprehensive analysis reports that compare/contrast experimental and simulation data will be required. Oral presentations summarizing the results from the experiments will also be required.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 10.434 or 24.434 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering II.

Graduate Research Seminar (Formerly 24.601)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Selected Topics in Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.651)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Supervised Tchg - Nuclear Engineering (Formerly 24.705)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Graduate Project - Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.733)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Graduate Project - Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.739)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Thesis Review (Formerly 24.741)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Master's Thesis - Nuclear Engineering (Formerly 24.743)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Master's Thesis - Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.746)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Master's Thesis - Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.749)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Dissertation/Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.753)

Description

Advanced research work required of students performed under the supervision of a senior faculty member in the Nuclear Engineering Program. The dissertation topic must be approved by the doctoral committee.

Doctoral Dissertation/Energy Engineering (Formerly 24.756)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Doctoral Dissertation/Energy (Formerly 24.759)

Description

Advanced research work required of students performed under the supervision of a senior faculty member in the Energy Engineering Program. The dissertation topic must be approved by the doctoral committee.

Continued Graduate Research (Formerly 24.766)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Continued Graduate Research (Formerly 24.769)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.