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Course Listing Disability Studies

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Introduction to Asian American Studies

Description

This course provides students with an overview of the multidisciplinary field of Asian American Studies from two distinct disciplines. The course begins with the history of Asian American Studies and the methods used to advance the field. Next, various aspects of the Asian American experience, such as gender and sexuality, are examined. Students also participate in service learning in partnership with Asian-serving community organizations in and around Lowell, MA. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1010 or 1020 College Writing I or II or (42.103 Col Writing I-Internatl or ENGL 1110 College Writing I ESL) or HONR.1100.

Gender, Race, and Crime (Formerly 44.360)

Description

This course examines gender and racial implications of criminal laws, criminal justice practices and programs will be examined. The position of women and racial/ethnic minorities will be assessed from the different perspectives of victims, offenders, and criminal justice practitioners.

Inclusion in Education and Society

Description

This course focuses on the how students with disabilities are included in education and society The course offers multiple perspectives, strategies and readings to consider how inclusive schools and societies that provide supportive, context-appropriate conditions for learning can lead to more positive outcomes for all students and community members. Within the context of special education, students will be introduced to different types of disabilities and services that can be provided in schools, communities and in society to ensure effective inclusion of people with disabilities. This course ma be taken for the education minor.

Children with Disabilities in the Classroom (Formerly 01.505)

Description

This course examines the nature of cognitive emotional, developmental, sensory, and physical disabilities that compromise student capacity to make adequate academic progress without special intervention. Legal and ethical responsibilities of the educator in inclusive classroom settings and as an active member of a multidisciplinary learning team are emphasized.

Children with Disabilities in the Classroom (Formerly 01.505)

Description

This course examines the nature of cognitive emotional, developmental, sensory, and physical disabilities that compromise student capacity to make adequate academic progress without special intervention. Legal and ethical responsibilities of the educator in inclusive classroom settings and as an active member of a multidisciplinary learning team are emphasized.

Disability in Literature (Formerly 42.258)

Description

This course explores how texts -- including novels, short stories, poems, memoirs, essays, plays, and videos -- portray people with disabilities. We will consider the problematic stereotypes about disabilities that sometimes appear in popular culture and literary depictions, and read texts that provide insight into a diverse community of people with a range of disabilities.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Kinesiology (Formerly 38.315)

Description

This course combines the study of mechanics, kinematics, kinetics, anatomy and neuromuscular physiology to teach the examination and evaluation of human movement. The major focus of the course is in qualitative evaluation of movement. Topics also include quantitative evaluation, body mechanics, posture and gait evaluation with a focus on identification of abnormal movement patterns.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.1020 Anatomy & Physiology II, and PHYS.1040 General Physics II, or PHYS.1440 Physics II, and Co-req: EXER.3170 Kinesiology Laboratory.

Designing the Future World (Formerly 57.220)

Description

All purposeful human activity involves design. Every day we are surrounded by the products of design processes--buildings, cars, entertainment, corporations, schools, even laws and regulations. They make our lives easier in many ways, but they may also create significant social and environmental problems. In the past, designers often did not consider the impact of their deigns on society, or ignored the negative consequences. Our culture and legal system usually permitted, or even encouraged, this irresponsibility. Today, a small group of scholars, businessmen and women, and activists are rethinking how we design the things around us, with the goal of addressing the most pressing social and environmental issues. This class will introduce students to some of these issues, the people who are confronting them, and the ways in which all of us can contribute to designing a better Future World. With a series of hands on projects, coupled with readings and other resources, students will work to design aspects of the future. In the process you will learn about possible solutions to complex, important problems, but also learn valuable life skills such as problem framing, problem solving, critical thinking, active learning, communication, and simple construction methods. No previous experience is required-only curiosity and eagerness to learn.

Disability and the Law: Legal Rights of People with Disabilities (Formerly 41.250)

Description

This course examines the history and progress of the disability rights movement in America, the current state of the law, trends, and prospects for the future, with particular focus on those laws designed specifically to address the needs of people with disabilities.

Philosophy of Disability

Description

Examines the basic issues and problems in the philosophical study of disability, including engagement with the interdisciplinary field of disability studies. Provides a survey of issues relating to the lived experience of disability, disability and well-being, theories of disability, and the concepts of normality, fitness and ableism as they relate to the practice and institutions of medicine, politics, religion, and society more generally.

Equality, Justice and the Law (Formerly 45.361)

Description

This class investigates the American fascination with the "rule of law." Questions to be considered include the following: What do we mean by the rule of law? What is the relation between law and morality? How does the rule of law promote justice, and what is its connection with the ideal of equality? What is the role of a written Constitution in protecting the rule of law? Special emphasis will be given to the Equal Protection clause of the Constitution and its role in prohibiting discrimination against disadvantaged groups, including racial minorities, women, and the handicapped. We will also consider in detail some theories of constitutional interpretation, including the Original Intent theory.

Bioethics and Genetics Research (Formerly 45.401)

Description

This course addresses ethical issues that arise in biomedical research and practice including autonomy in the doctor-patient relationship, the duty of confidentiality, the right to refuse treatment, the right to death with dignity, the ethics of experimentation with human subjects, the ethics of genetic enhancement, and justice in health care distribution. The course will combine theoretical perspectives and concrete case studies that illustrate actual dilemmas that the health care profession has in fact encountered over the years.

Introduction to Politics and Sports (Formerly 46.218)

Description

Analyzes the growing importance of sports in American life. Examines the psychological, political and social impact of sports on society. Discusses how sports have been shaped by such monumental events as war, the civil rights movement, and the changing economy.

Constitutional Law: Rights & Liberties (Formerly 46.337)

Description

A study of constitutional law focused on rights and liberties. We will discuss the balance of liberty and authority under the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Fourteenth Amendment, due process, and equal protection, emphasizing the case law on freedom of religion, speech, press, gun rights, LBGT rights, race, abortion, gender, and the death penalty. Political Science offers two courses in constitutional law for students form any major who are preparing for law school or seeking a background in how constitutional law influences American politics and culture. POLI.3350 or POLI.3370 can be taken alone or both courses in either sequence. On campus and online versions are identical, so students can take each course in either format.

Community Psychology (Formerly 47.255)

Description

Surveys the field of community psychology, including principles of social justice, diversity, and social change. The course reviews historical antecedents, paradigms, conceptual models, strategies and tactics of social and community change and action; examples from selected contexts and social systems, including education, mental health, community organizations, the workplace, health care, justice system, and social services will be employed. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Abnormal Psychology (Formerly 47.272)

Description

Presents an introduction to the study of various patterns of mental, behavioral, and personality disorders including diagnosis, etiology, and treatment. Current research-based theoretical approaches will be discussed as a means to gain a better understanding of psychological, biological, and sociocultural causes. Emphasis will be placed on the important notion that mental health problems are not only linked to individual factors, but also to family, community/social, cultural, societal, political, and historical factors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Learning and Behavior (Formerly 47.312)

Description

Examines various methods and techniques suitable for the modification of human behavior, based on the principles and findings of experimental studies of animal and human behavior. Considers how such methods can be used in education, mental health and corrections, and self-directed personal change.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Psychology and Women (Formerly 47.335)

Description

Considers such topics as: the psychology of sex differences; biological bases of psychological sex differences; the nature of female sexuality; clinical theory and practice concerning women; women as mental patients and mental health consumers; implications for psychology and for women's status.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Culture and Psychology (Formerly 47.336)

Description

Provides an analysis to the impact of culture, socio-historical, and social influences on psychological processes and outcomes. Students will also learn about techniques for studying the influence of culture including cross-cultural methods and population-specific methods. Through careful analysis of research literature, this class will examine a variety of contexts within the U.S. and internationally. Topics will include identity development, immigration, acculturation, socialization, and social interactions among groups.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Adult Development and Aging (Formerly 47.360)

Description

Begins with an overview of recent theoretical perspectives on adult development and aging. In chronological sequence, it presents the stages of adulthood and concludes with death and dying. Topics covered include personal, family, and vocational development through adulthood, gender pattern differences, and the impact of changing demographics, including the lengthening of the life span.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology and PSYC 2600 Child & Adolescent Development.

Developmental Psychopathology (Formerly 47.361)

Description

Examines behavior problems of childhood and adolescence across developmental transitions with a focus on the interaction of risk and protective factors in the child and his or her social context (e.g., family, school, friendships). Problems such as depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, ADHD, learning disabilities, and the consequences of trauma and maltreatment are addressed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC 1010 General Psychology and PSYC 2600 Child & Adolescent Development.

Psychology of Developmental Disabilities (Formerly 47.362)

Description

This course examines a range of developmental disabilities, their etiology, consideration of underlying brain function, assessment procedures, and current diagnostic, treatment and educational approaches. In addition, the impact of disability on individuals and the families of those affected, cultural and social aspects of disability, and current practices in service provision will be considered.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Introduction to Disability Studies (Formerly 47.363)

Description

This course provides students with a wide range of interests and backgrounds with the opportunity to examine their own mental model(attitudes/values/ assumptions) of disability. It includes an overview of the nature of intellectual disability and other disabilities and it provides opportunities to explore and understand the historical social response to disability. Students will look at a range of strategies for providing support and intervention and they will learn about how to effect change through a variety of strategies, including advocacy.

Prerequisites

Pre Req: PSYC.1010, General Psychology; student may not enroll if already has credit for 59.363.

Dvptl Disabilities Fieldwork: Service Provision

Description

In this fieldwork course we explore standards for support and service provision within human services and compare experiences in field placements with these standards, seeking to understand the forces that support or interfere with realizing best practices in disability services. The foundation for this blended learning course (half the classes meet in-person, half online) will be 60 hours fieldwork with an individual with an intellectual/developmental disability. This course integrates course material with field placement experiences through presentation, discussion, group work, case study, and video materials that address course objectives. Each student will have the time to develop an understanding of a person with I/DD, and how individualized planning can facilitate social inclusion.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Dvptl Disabilities Fieldwork: Leadership & Advoc

Description

In this fieldwork course we explore standards for support and service provision within formal services and compare experiences in field placements with these standards, seeking to understand the forces that support of interfere with realizing best practices. The foundation for this blended learning course (half the classes meet in person, half online) will be 60 hours of fieldwork within a human service organization or educational setting for people with an intellectual/developmental disability. This course provides a critical examination of the nature of organizations and the impact of leadership and advocacy on the lives of people with disabilities through integrating course material with fieldwork experiences through presentation, discussion, group work, case study, and video materials.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science .

Introduction to Behavioral Intervention in Autism (Formerly 47.561)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the causes and diagnosis of autism, scientific validation, applied behavior analysis, and ethical treatment. Students also learn to write functional objectives, plan positive reinforcement, and design an applied measurement system in the context of developing Individualized Family Service Plans and Individualized Education plans. The issue of culturally appropriate interventions is addressed Prerequisite: coursework in the psychology of child development, or permission.

Introduction to Public Health (Formerly 30.102)

Description

Public health topics, both historical and contemporary are of importance to all citizens and to societal decisions. This survey course provides a foundation for understanding public health through exposure to current health care and policy issues viewed through the perspective of multiple disciplines. Methodology for understanding population health and developing critical thinking and decision-making skills in the analysis of public health issues using a population-based perspective will be developed. The course will provide an ecological understanding of the causation and prevention of disease with an emphasis on health issues that affect society as a whole.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: College of Health Sciences Majors, or Public Health minors, or Permission of Instructor.

Community Health and Environment (Formerly 31.201)

Description

This course emphasizes the concepts, philosophy, and principles of public health and their relationship to physical, mental, and social well-being of the community. The focus is on the prevention of disease, the promotion and maintenance of health, and the provision of environmental and personal health services through organized community effort.

Prerequisites

College of Health Sciences Majors or Permission of Instructor.

Sociology of Disability (Formerly 48.225)

Description

This course is organized around several key questions that are used to study the concepts of disability and ability from a variety of sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives. Specifically, the course explores representations of disability in popular culture and medical discourses to discuss disability and ability as social constructs. By looking at various literary and cultural representations, this course investigates constructions of the disabled and abled body, how this becomes politicized, and the implications of these constructions.

Race and Ethnicity (Formerly 48.234)

Description

This course locates and studies the sociological dynamics of race and ethnic relations in the United States as it pertains to all groups. The course material presents theories and models that explain periods of conflict and cooperation between diverse sets of people. While providing some historical background, the course focuses primarily on recent and contemporary situations.

Sociology of Gender (Formerly 48.240)

Description

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of gender studies. A variety of topics are presented, such as gender stratification, work and family, sexual identities, media representations of women and men, women's movement, and violence against women. Feminist theories and methods are also introduced.

Sociology of Deviance (Formerly 48.255)

Description

Analysis of how social institutions define and respond to various forms of social deviance, from individual mental illness to gang violence to illegal acts by governments and corporations. Attention will be paid to the construction and management of deviant identities, the role played by social status, and the social importance of institutions of social control.

Community Service (Formerly 48.320)

Description

Course uses fieldwork approach to understand social problems and to discipline study and career pursuit in the area of public service.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Intersections of Disability and Gender

Description

This course is organized around several questions that will be used to help engage students in the study of the concepts of disability and gender from a variety of sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives. The course will explore feminist representations of disability and gender in popular culture discourses to discuss disability as well as gender as social constructs. By analyzing books, movies, television, cartoons, and the internet, we will look at how conceptualizations of disability and gender intersect and are represented in these "texts" and the possible influences on perceptions and definitions of disability.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: SOCI.2250 Sociology of Disability, or SOCI.2400 Sociology of Gender, or GNDR.2400 Introduction to Gender Studies.

Feminist Methodologies (Formerly 48.405)

Description

Despite the recent growth of feminist methodologies, there is no one way of doing feminist methodologies. The growing body of literature in this area addresses the distinctive challenges and strengths of doing this research. Gender Studies scholars especially seek to question the framing of a study, managing of emotions, and ethical dilemmas. We will explore feminist strategies for creating, implementing, and analyzing a project that is grounded in the everyday lives of people while situating them in a social, political, and economic context. We will explore the interdisciplinary intersections where these challenges push at the boundaries of the disciplines of your major field of study. We will also investigate how to use as variety of qualitative approaches while doing a feminist project and the ways in which feminism can enlighten understandings of "traditional" qualitative methods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: SOCI.4030 Sociological Research 2: Qualitative Approaches, and Sociology Majors only or permission of instructor.