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Course Listing Architectural Studies

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


History of Architecture (Formerly 58.206)(Formerly ARHI.2060)

Description

A survey of the major technical and stylistic developments in ecclesiastical and secular architecture from Prehistory to the present day studied with an emphasis on the major monuments (Parthenon, Pantheon, Gothic Cathedrals, St. Peter's, Versailles Palace, Eiffel Tower, Guggenheim Museum). Spring, alternate years.

Special Topics in Architectural Studies

Description

Special Topics in Architectural Studies

Introduction to Interior Design

Description

This class introduces students to the power of shaping interior spaces through a focus on design principles and the design process. Humans are creatures of habit, and we find comfort in spaces designed to function within our own cultural norms; by exploring color theory and diverse media, students will learn to design spaces that respond to, protect, and address human needs in different societies. The course strengthens skills in both freehand drawing and computer assisted design through 2D and 3D projects.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010 College Writing I.

Introduction to Architectural Design

Description

This studio-based course introduces students to the ways the discipline of architecture shapes our built environment. Students will not only learn how to make architectural drawings but also consider the social responsibility to design buildings and public spaces that address community needs.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010 College Writing I.

American Architecture (Formerly 58.314)(Formerly ARHI.3140)

Description

This course begins with a discussion of native American building traditions and proceeds chonologically from the 17th through the 20th centuries. Students will gain a familiarity with the major movements in American architecture (such as Colonial, Greek Revival, Victorian, Arts and Crafts, City Beautiful, International Style, Postmodern) as well as the leading archiects such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Frank Gehry. The architecture is discussed in its historical context with attention to the inventions, materials and aesthetic assumptions that made it possible.

Modern Architecture (Formerly 58.315)(Formerly ARHI.3150)

Description

This course will examine global architecture from the 19th century to the present. It addresses the major movements, "-isms", architects, publications, schools, and technological innovations that contributed to varied (and often conflicting) notions of "Modern architecture." Growing nationalism and politics, travel and colonial occupation, the effects of war, and changing conceptions of nature and science, all transformed the built environment. This course will provide a better understanding not only of individual works but also of the ways architecture manifests important themes such as nationalism, regionalism, functionalism, rationalism, and the most current theme, happiness.

Architectural Utopias (Formerly ARHI.3160)

Description

can we build a better world? Many people from various eras and geographical locations have argued we can. The idea of utopia -- a place of harmony free from want and strife -- has shaped both imagined and real places. So has its opposite: dystopia. This course will focus on architectural visions and solutions for utopias from the ancient world to the present: from myths of long-lost cities to projected colonies on the moon and Mars.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Zen and the Arts of Japan

Description

This course examines how the religious and philosophical traditions of Zen, originally a Buddhist practice of meditation, have become intertwined with Japanese aesthetic principles. It will focus on the design of architecture and gardens that embodied Zen teachings, and the activities that take place in those spaces, such as chanoyu (tea ceremony), as well as works of art such as calligraphy and ceramics. Covering the period from the 13th through the 20th centuries, the course traces the changing philosophical concepts of enlightenment and their aesthetic expression.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Dragon Throne and the Arts of China (Formerly ARHI.3340)

Description

Beijing has served as the political and cultural capital in China since the 15th century. At its core lies the Forbidden City, the largest preserved ancient wooden palatial compound in the world. This course centers first on examining the formal features of the City's layout, spatial planning, decorative schemes, and technical innovations, as well as the integration of the arts within the City. It then investigates how these features supported the profound socio-political symbolism of the empire and its cultural significance both historically and in the 20th century after the establishment of Communist China in 1949. A careful study of the Forbidden City allows us to engage with critical questions about the past and our own position as recipients of such a rare legacy of world civilization.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The City and the Environment (Formerly ARHI.3550)

Description

This class will assess the ideas, strategies, and ethical debates at the intersection of city development and the environment through three major questions. First, what are the most significant environmental issues that confront cities today and what are the ethical considerations for potential solutions? Second, how are the available options for cities a consequence of their original designs and past reinvention projects? Three, how do political, civic, non-profit, and institutional stakeholders come together to accept or reject sustainable development best practices and innovative solutions: The course is designed for students to hear from real-world experts to apply theoretical concepts, provide a concrete basis for analyzing public discussions of city development, and expose students to the diverse entities and organizations that work together at the intersection of cities and the natural world. Students will gain an understanding about how to critically assess the public discussions about city development, natural resource protection, and new frontiers of sustainable development.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010 College Writing I, or ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Directed Study in Architectural Studies

Description

Supervised individual research on a topic related to the built environment. "Variable credit course, student chooses appropriate amount of credits when registering."

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Practicum in Architectural Studies

Description

A program of on-campus or off-campus experiences for Architectural Studies minors. The practicum provides an opportunity for students to work with university or local organizations to gain hands-on experience with projects related to the built environment. 

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art (Formerly 58.203)

Description

A survey of the origins of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the prehistoric period through approximately 1300 CE. Works of art are discussed in their historical, cultural, and artistic contexts.

Drawing I (formerly 70.155, 70.255)

Description

Provides a foundation in basic drawing concepts using a variety of media and approaches. The emphasis is on building visual literacy and its application to the realm of ideas. A wide range of assignments are given to develop graphic expression.

Drawing II (Formerly 70.156, 70.256)

Description

The emphasis is on giving form to ideas through building a solid sense of visual literacy. Assignments include a wide range of color media, surface, and subject matter with the focus on the psychological and structural use of color, creative experimentation, and the development of personal style. Fall and spring.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Fine Arts Majors, Minors and BLA concentration only.

Graphic Design I (Formerly 70.210)

Description

Exercises, lectures and projects will introduce students to graphic design principles and techniques. Course will begin with a fundamental study of image, form, and space relations, then cover such topics as working with grids, typography basics, page layout, the introduction of color, rendering techniques, denotative and connotative image making, history, and more. Students will be assigned a series of projects to enhance their visual communication skills. Students will be introduced to the software used in contemporary design practice. Students must earn a C+ or better in the course to continue in the Graphic Design BFA program.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARTS 1010 Art Concepts, ARTS 1020 Art Concepts II, ARTS 1130 Digital Foundations, ARTS 2010 Form & Content, ARTS 1550 Drawing I, and ARTS 1560 Drawing II, or Permission of Instructor.

Sculpture I (formerly 70.235)

Description

The exploration of three-dimensional form through the use of basic materials, methods and approaches. Assignments will include expressive problems based on human and non-objective form relationships. Spring.

Printmaking (formerly 70.267)

Description

An introduction to basic printmaking processes and aesthetics with the emphasis on etching. The approach is concept oriented, emphasizing experimentation and exploration on an individual level to communicate ideas. Fall.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARTS.1550 Drawing I, and ARTS.1560 Drawing II.

Painting I (formerly 70.271)

Description

Presents oil painting techniques as vehicles for serious creative expression. A variety of assignments will be given to help the student build proficiency in the use of color, paint handling, and subject matter.

3D Modeling and Animation I (formerly 70.276)

Description

This course will focus mainly on the forms, materials, and composition of 3D computer grahics in the various environments. Students will explore the possibility of 3D computer graphics for creative expression as well as innovative visual communications such as animation, game, sculpture, print and design. Rendering, lighting and camera as well as material and texturing techniques will be also explored. The course will also introduce the student to historical and contemporary perspectives related to the discipline.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARTS.1130 Digital Foundations, or Permission of Instructor.

Place: A Visual Exploration of Lowell (Formerly ARTS.2711)

Description

This studio course is designed for students who have an interest in making images to explore the concept of "place", using the landscape of Lowell as a creative resource. Open to all university students, the course is structured for students who are new to the arts as well as students who have previous studio art experience. Drawing upon the unique features of the particular landscape that is the city of Lowell, students will build a body of images that is a response to the geographical and cultural histories evident in the city's physical attributes. From its history as the center of industry and textile design to the present day, the city will be viewed as raw material for the conceptual foundation of the work produced in this course. (Class will meet both on and off-campus.)

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Introduction to Engineering for Civil and Environmental (Formerly 25.107/14.107)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the elements of computer aided design using AutoCAD. Through assignments and projects, students learn various AutoCAD principles, i.e., graphic entities, hatch patterns, layering, and dimensioning, with special emphasis on completing a design project. Two-dimensional drafting and three-dimensional modeling and surface revolution are also discussed. This course is intended for freshmen in civil and environmental engineering majors.

Literature on Technology and Human Values (Formerly 42.249)

Description

A study of the relationship between works of fiction, cultural attitudes toward technology, and social values. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Writing About Place (Formerly 42.324)

Description

Writers throughout time have been thoroughly grounded in place. Students in this course will read and write on a variety of topics: travel, cities, suburbs, dwelling places, nature, environmental issues, etc., in a variety of genres: creative non-fiction, essays, journalism, short stories, poetry, journals. This course will be held in a workshop format with strong emphasis on revision.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Writing about the Environment

Description

From John Muir to Rachel Carson to Bill McKibben, environmentalists have traditionally relied upon the power of their prose to transform the thoughts and behavior of their contemporaries. Stemming form the premise that writing is a form of environmental action, this course introduces students to a range of modes of writing in environmental studies. In the process of reading, discussing and practicing different kinds of environmental writing, students will develop a variety of writing skill in addition to an appreciation for writing as an important form of environmental action.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Co-req: ENGL.2270 Essay Writing for English majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing, or ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Global Environmental Studies

Description

This course investigates how human activities impact the earth's environment on a local, national, and global scale. Topics covered include the scientific method, population, fresh water resources, air and water pollution, climate change, energy, biodiversity, food security, solid waste management and sustainable living. Suitable as a Science elective for a degree in the College of Sciences.

Prerequisites

Co-req: ENVI.1120L Global Environmental Studies Lab, and Anti-req: ENVI.1200 Principles of Environmental Science. Please Note: Academic petition is required for anti-req exceptions.

General Geology (Formerly 89.101)

Description

Presents a study of the earth with emphasis on earth materials, earth structure (crustal and internal), earth history, and the development of life. Designed for the general student.

Prerequisites

Co-req: GEOL.1030L General Geology Lab, and Anti-req: ENVI.2010 Earth Systems Geosphere. Please Note: Academic petition is required for anti-req exceptions.

Geology for Engineers (Formerly 89.325)

Description

This course will introduce basic geological principles with an emphasis on engineering applications. Topics covered include minerals and rocks and their properties, surface processes, earthquakes and rock deformation, dynamic processes that affect the earth's surface, geological hazards and their mitigation, earth resources.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM 1210 Chemistry l, CHEM 1230L Chemistry l Lab, PHYS 1410 Physics l, and PHYS 1410L Physics l Lab.

Management Calculus (Formerly 92.122)

Description

Review of difference quotient, least squares modeling, limit of difference quotient, differential calculus: derivatives, differentials, higher-order derivatives, implicit differentiation, relative and absolute maxima and minima of functions, and applications of derivatives to business and economics. Integrals and applications to business. No credit in Science or Engineering.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MATH.1200 Precalculus Math I, or MATH.1205 Applied Precalc, or MATH.1210 Mgmt Precalculus, or MATH.1225 Precalculus Math I, or MATH.1270 Prep for Calc, or current ALEKS score of 55 of higher.

Calculus I (Formerly 92.131)

Description

Serves as a first course in calculus. Functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, rules for differentiation of algebraic and transcendental function; chain rule, implicit differentiation, related rate problems, linearization, applied optimization, and curve sketching. Introduction to area and integration. Students are expected to have taken pre-calculus and trigonometry in order to be successful in this course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Current ALEKS math placement 76-100, or MATH.1230 Precalculus II with a grade of 'C-' or higher.

Immigration and Global Justice

Description

This course addresses the question of justice in regards to immigration policy. We consider a variety of views including Communitarianism, Liberalism, Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism, and Democratic Theory. We will look at how these different positions have answered the following sorts of questions: Do we have duties to strangers of foreigners that are of equal weight to the duties we owe to members of our family, our circle of friends or our nation? Does part of the definition of "self-determined state" include the right to unilaterally reject petitions of inclusion from non-citizens? Does a commitment to equality demand that borders be open?

Introduction to Environmental Politics (Formerly 46.175)

Description

This course introduces major concepts in environmental politics to provide a comprehensive understanding of the formation of environmental policy in the United States. Throughout the course, particular attention is paid to the role of government and markets in creating environmental crises and shaping policy responses.

Introduction to Public Administration and Policy (Formerly 46.253)

Description

An examination of the little studied fourth branch of government. Bureaucratic power in the American political system is reconsidered.

Introduction to Public Health (Formerly 30.102)

Description

Public health topics, both historical and contemporary are of importance to all citizens and to societal decisions. This survey course provides a foundation for understanding public health through exposure to current health care and policy issues viewed through the perspective of multiple disciplines. Methodology for understanding population health and developing critical thinking and decision-making skills in the analysis of public health issues using a population-based perspective will be developed. The course will provide an ecological understanding of the causation and prevention of disease with an emphasis on health issues that affect society as a whole.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: College of Health Sciences Majors, or Public Health minors, or Permission of Instructor.

Principles of Environmental Health Science (Formerly PUBH.208)

Description

This is a survey course that provides an overview of the rapidly growing field of environmental health, through an introduction to the links between environmental stressors and impacts on public health. The course will explore human and industrial activities that impact on health such as overpopulation, food production, air and water pollution, waste, toxic substances, pests, and global climate change. The course will also examine the types of diseases and illnesses that result from environmental impacts. These impacts have multiple causes and understanding these can in turn provide clues as to the most effective prevention options. Students will explore topics of interest in greater detail through short writing assignments. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Public Health Majors or Minors or Permission of Instructor.

Climate Crisis and Society (Formerly 48.236)

Description

Focusing on case studies of recent and pending environmental disasters, this course will trace how political, social, economic and cultural arrangements and choices contribute to environmental catastrophes and their resolution. In order to identify possibilities for agency, students will play several environmental games in which they will assume roles in the global economy, governmental and civil society to identify possibilities for agency. As a final project, students will describe a recent disaster identifying both structures that create environmental stresses and the options that might exist for structural changes. The project is intended to develop both critical thinking and communication skills.

Urban Sociology (Formerly 48.345)

Description

Deals with issues related to the quality of life in American cities. Students taking this course may engage in research projects on the city of Lowell and the role of the University of Massachusetts Lowell within that city.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology.

Foundations of Theatrical Design (Formerly THEA 230)

Description

Basic principles and techniques in scenic, lighting and costume design for theatre. Replaces 42.260 and 59.386; credits may not be earned for both 42.260 and THEA 230 or for 59.386 and THEA 230.

Play Production (Formerly THEA 311)

Description

Introduction to the design and technical aspects of theatre through hands-on experience working on campus productions. Focus on basic principles of set, lighting, props, costume, makeup, and sound production. May be repeated for credit.