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Bachelor of Science in Public Health

Create Health Communities Through Education, Research & Promotion

UML Public Health grad Dan Howell '16 '18 was the site manager for Stop the Spread in Lowell Photo by K. Webster

Public health graduate Daniel Howell ’16 ’18, a project manager and outreach coordinator at the Lowell Community Health Center, organized and supervised a statewide testing campaign to slow the spread of the virus. Read "Stopping the Spread."

The pandemic exposed the critical role that public health professionals play to prevent diseases and promote health. With a B.S. in public health, you’ll be prepared for a career that creates healthy communities through education, research and promotion of healthy environments and lifestyles.

The cornerstone of the program is health promotion and disease prevention, rather than on diagnosing and treating illnesses and conditions after they occur.

Public health jobs exist in private industry, organizations, local communities, and state and national settings.

We offer the Public Health BS in two options: Community Health/Health Promotion and Health Sciences. See more details below.

Students will also attain a foundation of knowledge that is necessary to pursue graduate studies in public health and health sciences.

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Health Sciences - This option will provide a strong emphasis on health sciences with flexibility in selecting health science courses and electives under academic advisor guidance. Sufficient elective credits are included in health science coursework to allow students the opportunity to select science courses in an area of their interest within a public health framework. This option not only prepares students to work in the field of public health, but could also be used as a pathway to graduate degrees in various areas of health sciences such as direct entry graduate nursing programs, occupational therapy, and post-graduate professional health programs, including medical school.

For additional information including learning outcomes and course listings visit the academic catalog.

Community Health/Health Promotion Concentration - Students will be involved in service learning and community health practicum experiences and take courses to increase skills in communication and teaching related to health promotion and prevention in community settings. This option will prepare students for careers as community health educators in a variety of settings including community health centers, hospitals, long term care facilities, corporate wellness, and nonprofit organizations.

For additional information including learning outcomes and course listings visit the academic catalog.

  • A high school diploma.
  • Overall minimum GPA of 3.0
  • Completion of high school program that focuses on college prep courses including English, biology, and chemistry.  It is strongly recommended that incoming freshman take math through pre-calculus or calculus and complete high school physics.
  • Minimum combined SAT scores of 1,000 (mathematics and verbal).
  • Students must be able to meet the technical standards of the college and the program so that they can actively participate in all phases of class, practicum and laboratory work, with or without reasonable accommodations.
Visit UML Undergraduate Admissions for details.
With a B.S. in public health, you’ll be prepared for a career that creates healthy communities through education, research and promotion of healthy environments and lifestyles. The cornerstone of the program is health promotion and disease prevention, rather than on diagnosing and treating illnesses and conditions after they occur.
Graduates of the BS in Health Science Concentration work in:
This option emphasizes health sciences with flexibility in selecting courses and electives under the guidance of an academic advisor. Sufficient elective credits are included in health science coursework to allow you the opportunity to select courses in an area of your interest within a public health framework. This option not only prepares you to work in the field of public health, but could also serve as a pathway to graduate degrees in various areas of health sciences, including medical school, physician assistant, nursing and other postgraduate professional health programs.
Graduates of the BS in Community Health/Health Promotion Concentration work in:
This option will prepare you for a career as a community health professional in a variety of settings, including:
  • Community health centers 
  • Local and state public health departments 
  • Hospitals 
  • Long-term care facilities 
  • Corporate wellness organizations 
  • Nonprofit organizations
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There is growing popularity of Public Health majors and minors in the United States as a result of the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations for universities to promote an educated citizenry by providing access to public health education to all undergraduate students. An understanding of global health challenges and social responsibilities in regard to critical public health issues is important for promoting a healthy society. A minor in Public Health will prepare students to address these challenges.

Public Health Minor

UMass Lowell students Jimmy Le and Sabrina Lozandieu pose for a picture at an internship fair.

Zuckerberg College of Health Sciences students, check out the Accelerated Bachelor's to Master's Degree Program.

It is an exciting time to pursue a master's degree in public health. You will not only make a difference in the world by improving human health, but you will also be in demand to fulfill much needed roles in the field.

Accelerated BS to MS Program

Meet Our Students

  • Shannon Gray
    Public Health

    Shannon Gray started earning her master's degree in Public Health with a focus on epidemiology as an undergraduate. Her internship with the Uxbridge Board of Health broadened her exposure to the role public health professionals play and strengthened her skills.

  • Annie Soup Koagne
    Public Health

    Annie Soup Koagne is getting everything she can out of UMass Lowell, while working to make it a better place.

  • Cassie Harding
    Public Health

    Cassie Harding’s internship experiences as a public health student inspired her to tackle the big health and wellness challenges facing people in the cities and towns around her.

  • Kelsey Gonzalez
    Public Health

    As a first-generation college student, Kelsey Gonzalez struggled to find a major she liked. Then she studied abroad – and came back determined to help other first-generation students.