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Art History Seminar (Formerly 58.490)

Description

Study of particular artist, style or selected art historical problem. Topics to be announced. Course may be repeated.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 58.204 History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art or Permission of Instructor.

Weather and Climate (Formerly 85.141)

Description

Serves as a general meteorology course for the non-science major. Topics include: atmospheric composition, solar radiation, temperature, moisture and condensation relationship between air pressure and wind, weather patterns, severe weather, optical phenomena in the atmosphere, and the behavior and possible change of climate. This course satisfies the Gen Ed science requirement, but not specific science requirements for majors in the Division of Science.

Principles of Ecology (Formerly 81.315)

Description

A series of lectures concerned with the interrelationships of organisms with their abiotic environment with emphasis on the New England area. Selected current topics will supplement the text.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 81.112 Principles of Biology II.

Principles of Ecology Laboratory (Formerly 81.317)

Description

A series of laboratory exercises to supplement and illustrate lectures of 81.315. Field trips are an integral part of the course involving sampling and analysis of such ecosystem components as water, soil, invertebrate fauna and characteristic flora of various habitats. Directed readings, quizzes, practical exam and oral presentation of a research topic are integral parts of the course.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 81.315 Principles of Ecology.

Climate Change: Science, Communication, and Solutions (Formerly 81.416)

Description

Climate change offers one of the greatest challenges yet faced by society and scientists. The scientific consensus is clear that climate change is occurring, its pace is accelerating, its impacts on human society will be largely negative, and it is largely caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Yet, despite strong scientific evidence for the enormous challenges that society may face, scientists' attempts to disseminate that evidence beyond their peers have not yet been successful. Indeed in today's media world of blogs, YouTube video clips, and sound-bites, confusion over the scientific reality of climate change frequently dominates the discourse in classrooms and communities. This course will provide students with the tools and knowledge that they need to develop their own well-informed view of climate change. Because climate change is both impacted by humans and will increasingly impact society, this course takes a cross-disciplinary approach, integrating science, policy solutions, and media literacy as they relate to climate change.

Introduction to Environmental Economics (Formerly 49.315/415)

Description

This is a renumbering of an existing course, 49.315. The renumbering to the 400 level is to allow Masters students in programs with environmental content to take this course for credit with their advisor's approval. This course introduces students to the economic and policy aspects of environmental quality and natural resource issues. Simple and complex models are used to blend economic theory with environmental facts. Students will learn to derive policy insights from theoretical constructs. The primary objective is to show how the basic principles in economics can play a valuable role in analyzing and evaluating critical environmental issues and help in determining policy guidelines. Standard benefit cost or efficiency criteria will be applied to a wide variety of environmental issues.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics).

Literature on Technology and Human Values (Formerly 42.249)

Description

A study of the relationship between works of fiction, cultural attitudes toward technology, and social values. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Writing About Place (Formerly 42.324)

Description

Writers throughout time have been thoroughly grounded in place. Students in this course will read and write on a variety of topics: travel, cities, suburbs, dwelling places, nature, environmental issues, etc., in a variety of genres: creative non-fiction, essays, journalism, short stories, poetry, journals. This course will be held in a workshop format with strong emphasis on revision.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing.

Directed Studies: Environment and Society

Description

An individual supervised research project relative to issues of the environment and society. Thematic or methodological issues must result in a significant research paper.

The World of Things: Consumer Cultures in the Modern West (Formerly 43.301)

Description

This course will examine the emergence and historical impact of consumer cultures in the modern West, from the eighteenth century through the present. Topics to be covered will include the emergence of spaces of consumption (the home, the commercial/spectacular metropolis, the department store, the shopping mall, the tourist site), changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, the construction of modern social identities of class, gender, generation and race through consumption, and political struggles over consumption.

American Environmental History (Formerly 43.316)

Description

This course explores the environmental history of early America and the United States from the end of the last ice age (c. 12,500 years ago) to the present. It examines the role played by nature as an historical agent as well as the relationship between human communities and the physical and organic environment. Course themes include evolving land use, the environmental significance of industrial capitalism, urban public health, resource conservation and wilderness protection, the impact of ecology on public consciousness, as well as environmentalism.

Environmental Law (Formerly 41.367)

Description

This course examines the legal and administrative problems of protecting the quality of the human environment. Federal and state legislation on environmental policy is studied. Public interest litigation as a supplement to the enforcement of environmental law is discussed. The course also focuses on the practical problems of balancing the needs of business, the global competitiveness of the United States, the increasing demand for natural resources, and the need to protect, preserve, and restore the environment. The importance of sustainable development and environmental ethics are discussed.

Environmental Philosophy (Formerly 45.327)

Description

An examination of the philosophical foundations of environmentalism. Addresses both the question of ethical duties we owe to animals and to nature, and also the question of man's relation to the natural world.

Introduction to Environmental Politics (Formerly 46.175)

Description

This course introduces major concepts in environmental politics to provide a comprehensive understanding of the formation of environmental policy in the United States. Throughout the course, particular attention is paid to the role of government and markets in creating environmental crises and shaping policy responses.

Thoreau in Our Time (Formerly 46.357)

Description

This course traces Henry David Thoreau's influence on major social and political transformations in American history from the abolitionist movement to the present day. We will focus first on Thoreau's writings on slavery, commercial development, environmental history, and individual liberty. Then we will study his formative role in the civil rights and environmental movements of the twentieth century. Finally, through a mix of outside speakers and student presentations, we will explore how his writings continue to shape ongoing struggles to contend with climate change, advance social justice, and promote a greater sense of fairness in American life. The course will involve at least one trip to Walden Pond and a tour of Thoreau's birthplace in Concord, Massachusetts. Course page: http://faculty.uml.edu/sgallagher/Thoreau_in_Our_Time.html.

Global Environmental Policy (Formerly 46.358)

Description

This course explores contemporary international environmental issues from both theoretical and policy perspectives; consideration too of broader forces impacting international environmental politics.

Sustainable Development (Formerly PUBH/57.211)

Description

This course examines workplace and regional factors that shape the prospects for sustainable prosperity and worker and community empowerment. The course begins by reviewing recent trends in the distribution of income and wealth and the industrial structure of the New England economy. The historical dynamics shaping work organization and regional development are examined. Several industry case studies are selected because of their importance to the regional and national economy. The case studies provide focus for studying the strategic choices made by firms in mature industries and newly emerging regions; the basis of competitive advantage for Japanese firms and the response of American rivals; and the influence of the product cycle and regional institutions on capture or retention of emerging and mature industries. The final section of the course focuses on the prospects for sustainability of the organization of production and its environmental impact, incentives for skill development and technological innovation, and shared prosperity. A central course objective is to foster an understanding of the links between the workplace and region in the pursuit of sustainable development and shared prosperity.

Sociological Approaches to the Environment (Formerly 48.236)

Description

Focusing on case studies of recent and pending environmental disasters, this course will trace how political, social, economic and cultural arrangements and choices contribute to environmental catastrophes and their resolution. In order to identify possibilities for agency, students will play several environmental games in which they will assume roles in the global economy, governmental and civil society to identify possibilities for agency. As a final project, students will describe a recent disaster identifying both structures that create environmental stresses and the options that might exist for structural changes. The project is intended to develop both critical thinking and communication skills.

Fast Food, Hot Planet: Sociological Approaches (Formerly 48.330)

Description

With an eye on climate change sustainability, this course maps the social and historical dimensions of crisis and inequalities of food production and distribution. In addition to exploring food security's relation to sustainable food production, students will strengthen critical thinking, writing, and library research skills.