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Studies In World Art (Formerly 58.302)

Description

Historical and critical examination of regions works of art from China, Asia, the Islamic world, India, Africa, North America, Latin America, Native American Art and Mexico. Topics vary from year to year. Course may be repeated.

Asian Art (Formerly 58.331)

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide a general overview of the art of the traditional cultures of Asia, China, India and Japan. This survey provides a critical and historical examination of these cultures.

Introduction to Asian American Studies

Description

This course provides students with an overview of the multidisciplinary field of Asian American Studies from two distinct disciplines. The course begins with the history of Asian American Studies and the methods used to advance the field. Next, various aspects of the Asian American experience, such as gender and sexuality, are examined. Students also participate in service learning in partnership with Asian-serving community organizations in and around Lowell, MA. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1010 or 1020 College Writing I or II or (42.103 Col Writing I-Internatl or ENGL 1110 College Writing I ESL) or HONR.1100.

Economics of Less Developed Countries (Formerly 49.310)

Description

Formulation of an approach to development that includes the role of goals (growth, equity), sectors (agriculture, industry, services), resources (labor, capital, technology), government, international (trade, investment, debt), and political and socio-cultural factors. Examines success in a few Asian countries, failure in most of Africa, and crisis in South America emphasizing current controversies.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics).

American Ethnic Literature (Formerly 42.277)

Description

The course addresses the literature of America's immigrant and cultural groups and how it contributes to defining our national character. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Asian American Literature (Formerly 42.378)

Description

Asian Americans hold an intriguing place in the cultural imagination: as perpetual foreigners, as so-called 'model minorities' that serve to maintain hegemonic power relations, and as living embodiments of America's memory of its involvement in recent wars. As artists, however, Asian Americans have contributed and impressive body of literary work, and we'll examine some of the most enduring and provocative of these texts. We'll explore themes such as trauma and the immigrant experience, issues of exile and dislocation, Asian Americans' embattled place in our country's history, and the intersections of race and ethnicity with gender and sexuality. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

World Civilization I (Formerly 43.107)

Description

This class examines societies and cultures from ancient until early modern times with the underlying assumption that world history is an important conceptual tool for understanding our interdependent world. Course topics analyze the nature of the earliest human communities, the development of the first civilizations and the subsequent emergence of cultures in selected areas of Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas. This course also offers a consideration of issues related to the connections and relationships that shaped civilizations as a result of migration, war, commerce, and the various cultural expressions of self, society, and the cosmos before 1500. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

China & the Modern World (Formerly 43.204)

Description

This course introduces China's interactions with the world since the 1840s. With theOpium War as the starting point, students are ushered into a traditional China whosepolitical system, cultural values, and an economic structure stood in sharp contrast to those of the outside world. The main focus of the course is to explore the process inwhich China fought for its survival as a sovereign nation and searched for its road tomodernization.

Women in China (Formerly 43.207)

Description

From Confucian texts to current conditions, the course examines the evolution of Chinese women's status throughout the centuries. The course will ask questions such as whether Confucianism dictated oppression against women, what factors influenced the changes of status for women, how Western feminism is connected with Chinese women, what roles women played in transforming China, and how ordinary women lived and are still living in China.

World War II (Formerly 43.242)

Description

The Second World War transformed states and people from East Asia to the United States to Europe. We examine diplomatic and military aspects of the war and how it affected the lives of people in the countries involved. Topics include the prelude to the war, military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, collaboration and resistance, the home front, the Holocaust, science and the atom bomb, and the consequences of the war.

The Vietnam War (Formerly 43.249)

Description

Covers the U.S. was in Vietnam from its origins in the French colonial era to its impact on contemporary culture and foreign policy.

History of Lowell (Formerly 43.279)

Description

This course will provide an overview of the growth, decline, and rebirth of the city of Lowell, Massachusetts. Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, role of women and unions in the workplace, immigration and the formation of ethnic neighborhoods, urban renewal, and historic preservation. The survey will also discuss notable personalities such as labor activist Sarah Bagley, Civil War general Benjamin Butler, writer Jack Kerouac, Senator Paul Tsongas and boxer Micky Ward. The foregoing names may differ over time.

Japan Since 1600 (Formerly 43.295)

Description

A study of the traditional Japanese institutions and the transformation of Japan into a modern state after 1868: the Tokugawa Shogunate, Meiji Restoration, Russo-Japanese War, world power status, militarism, World War II, and present day Japan.

American East Asian Relations (Formerly 43.320)

Description

The course examines relations between the United States on one hand and Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, and the Philippines on the other in the 19th and 20th centuries. Besides political, trade, and cultural relations, there is also emphasis on American laws and practices regarding immigrants from these East Asian countries. The aim of the course is for students to gain a basic knowledge of American relations with East Asia and to develop analytical skills for sophisticated inter-national relations.

Introduction to World Religions (Formerly 45.296)

Description

A study of religious knowledge and the phenomena of religion from a philosophical standpoint. The course considers explanations for religious behavior, some central issues in religious belief, and the values and goals of religious systems. Various world religions provide specific data for these topics.

Mysticism: East and West (Formerly 45.340)

Description

This course explores the religious and psychological phenomenon known as the mystical experience, both within the context of organized religion and outside it. We will approach this subject from a comparative standpoint, considering examples from Christianity, Judaism, and Islam and also from Eastern religions such as Buddhism and Taoism. We will make use of philosophy, psychology, theology and literature in order to try to understand mysticism and its relation to religion. Readings include The Upanishads, the Tao Te Ching, the Bible, and Plato. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

World Philosophies (Formerly 45.350)

Description

This course will fuse the historical and the thematic approaches in order to undertake a comparative examination of the relations of the great philosophical traditions (Chinese, Indian, Western, Islamic, and Japanese) to the perennial issues of philosophy. The main focus will be the continuing vitality and heuristic fertility of these traditions and their ability to define how human Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Buddhist and Zen Philosophy (Formerly 45.371)

Description

Explores Buddhist and Zen philosophy and practice from ancient India through its developments in China and Japan to contemporary America. Attention is given to significant philosophical movements such as Abhidharmika, Madhyamika, Yogacara, Huayen, and Chan (Zen).

Politics and Film (Formerly 46.316)

Description

Analysis of the role of film in creating, expressing, revealing, and responding to social and political ideas and values. Examines a variety of film and film styles and introduces students to elements of film theory, the theory of popular culture and the role of film in forming our ideas about the world.

Politics of Race and Ethnicity (Formerly 46.349)

Description

A study of the politics of race and ethnicity, focusing primarily on American society, and the racial and ethnic groups of the region.

Southeast Asian Politics (Formerly 46.361)

Description

A study of Southeast Asian countries, their anti-colonial struggles and their patterns of political development. Attention is also given to the recent struggle among the former Indochinese states and the broader international involvement in the region.

Politics of China (Formerly 46.363)

Description

A study of the recent development of governmental institutions, parties, and ideology in China. Emphasis is placed on the processes of nation-building in the post World War II period.

Politics of Pacific Rim (Formerly 46.375)

Description

An examination of the politics, policies and institutions of Japan, the "four tigers" and other countries of the Pacific rim area.

Chinese 1 and Culture (Formerly 53.105)

Description

Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 105, 106 and 205, 206 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Chinese 2 and Culture (Formerly 53.106)

Description

Continuation of 53.105 Chinese 1 and Culture. Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 103, 104 and 205, 206 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 53.105 Chinese 1 and Culture.

Chinese 3 and Culture (Formerly 53.205)

Description

Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 105,106 and 205, 206 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 53.106 Chinese 2 and Culture.

Chinese 4 and Culture (Formerly 53.206)

Description

This course is a continuation of 53.205 Chinese 3 and Culture, which is a pre-requisite. Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 105, 106 and 205, 206 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 53.205 Chinese 3 and Culture.

Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (Formerly 53.300)

Description

This course offers an insight into Chinese culture and society by examining different genres of modern and contemporary Chinese Literature -- the novel, poetry, essay, and drama -- since the early Twentieth Century. Readings in English translations of representative works by major writers/essayists/poets/playwrights will be complemented by selected feature films and documentaries. The survey of Chinese literature will be put in the context of a series of sociopolitical changes in China that informed the production of these works.

Directed Study in Chinese Culture (Formerly 53.490)

Description

Students through regular consultation with the Instructor develop a course of directed study or independent study in Chinese Culture. Students findings are presented in a paper of significant proportion.

Advanced Tutorial in Chinese Culture (Formerly 53.495)

Description

A program of directed study to give an opportunity to a student to explore problems in Chinese Culture in greater dept or to initiate additional problems in Chinese Culture.

Cambodian 1 and Culture (Formerly 53.135)

Description

Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 135, 136 and 235, 236 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Cambodian 2 and Culture (Formerly 53.136)

Description

This course continues the oral practice, reading, writing, grammar and cultural studies begun in 53.135. Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 135, 136 and 235, 236 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLKH.1350 Cambodian 1 and Culture.

Introduction to Cambodian Culture (Formerly 59.210)

Description

This course focuses on the development of Southeast Asian art and culture from ancient times to the present. As a diverse region that is home to Muslims, Catholics and other Christians, Buddhists,Hindus and animists, examining arts and culture in Southeast Asia provides fascinating insight into the region's societies. This course examines performance, architecture and material culture from a variety of Southeast Asia, its contacts with neighboring regions, and the breadth of societies in the region and their motivation for creating art. Students will be introduced to theater, dance puppetry, martial arts and music of Southeast Asia. We will examine artistic forms influenced by ancient Hindus, Chinese, Arabs, Europeans during the colonial era, and other influences on the arts in Southeast Asia. Students will also explore how various art forms have political, social and religious functions in such regions as Thailand Indonesia (Bali and Java). Vietnam and Cambodia.

Cambodian 3 and Culture (Formerly 53.235)

Description

Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 135, 136 and 235, 236 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 53.136 Cambodian 2 and Culture.

Cambodian 4 and Culture (Formerly 53.236)

Description

This course is a continuation of 53.235 Cambodian 3 and Culture, which is a pre-requisite. Development of fundamental skills in oral expression, aural comprehension, reading and writing is required in language courses. Beginning and intermediate language courses at the 135, 136 and 235, 236 levels must be elected in the prescribed sequence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLKH.2350 Cambodian 3 and Culture.

The Literary Cultures of Cambodia

Description

This course provides a survey of the role and function of literature and literary institutions in Cambodia. Selections of literature in translation from various genres (poetry, the short story, novels) are analyzed in terms of the development of the particular genre and its function vis-a-vis Cambodia's cultural institutions. Similarly, the course examines the role of these cultural institutions in supporting the production of these literatures in different historical periods (classical to modern). Particular emphasis is given to the role of literature and literary institutions in the development of national and cultural identity during and after colonial rule.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLKH.2100 Introduction to Cambodian Culture.

Cambodian Culture in Lowell

Description

This course examines the emergence and growth the Cambodian American culture in Lowell from the early 1980s until the present. The course focuses on cultural and artistic organizations and events, such as the Angkor dance troupe and the Southeast Asian Water Festival within the changing political and historical context of Lowell during that period. Particular attention is given to the role of Cambodian cultural organizations and events in Lowell's cultural economy, which includes Lowell's art district and city organizations like the Cultural Organization of Lowell (COOL), the Merrimack Repertory Theater and the Lowell National Historical Park.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLKH.2100 Introduction to Cambodian Culture.

Contemporary Cambodian Cinema

Description

This 3-credit course examines Cambodian cinema and filmmakers from the 20th and 21st centuries. The course will include films in English or with English subtitles made by Cambodian filmmakers, as well as films about Cambodia made by foreign filmmakers. The course will be organized chronologically and thematically beginning with the first documentary films from the 1290's produced by foreign filmmakers, to Cambodia's "golden age" of cinema in the 1960's, to films from the 1980's about the genocide, to the fast-growing contemporary film scene in Cambodia. Students will view and examine the films in terms of their cultural context and how this context is reflected in the films' plot, characters and perspective.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLKH.2100 Introduction to Cambodian Culture.

Literature, Politics and Genocide in Cambodia (Formerly 59.349)

Description

This course will examine various literary and political responses to the Cambodian genocide, particularly personal accounts or literary testimony by survivors and government sanctioned legal proceedings. The course will consider how the literary and political responses to the Cambodian genocide have at different times paralleled, complimented and opposed each other. The course will also ask whether their overall effect contributes to or detracts from the serving of justice and the process of healing for the survivors. To pursue these questions, we will read selections from novels and poetry written by Cambodian survivors side by side with accounts of political activities of the Cambodian government and the international community to bring the perpetrators of the genocide to justice.

Special Topics: in Southeast Asian Studies (Formerly 53.400)

Description

An in-dept study of a specific topic dealing with the literature, culture, civilization, cinema exc., of southeast Asia. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in English. May be repeated once for credit, if content changes, and with written consent of the Instructor.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Directed Study in Cambodian Culture (Formerly 53.493)

Description

Students through regular and frequent consultation with their instructor develop a course of directed study in Cambodian (Kmer) culture, and define a problem for individual research. The student's findings are presented in a paper of significant proportions.