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Exterior shot of research reactor at UMass Lowell.

Nuclear Energy

Nuclear Energy Research

Chemical/Nuclear Engineering students working in the control room of the nuclear reactor.

The UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory provides controlled radiation environments and analytical measurement services to government organizations and to industry. The laboratory provides facilities for proton, neutron and gamma environments.

Although the main focus of the laboratory is to support the research and education missions of the university, use of its facilities by those outside the university is fully welcomed. Industry partnerships are also highly encouraged.

Under the direction of Professors Partha Chowdhury and C.J. Lister, the Radiation Laboratory has been used for pure and applied nuclear physics research, for simulating radiation conditions of hostile space environments, for non-destructive testing and analysis, for research and development of radiation resistant electronics and materials, and for research and development of radiation induced modifications to materials.

The Integrated Nuclear Security and Safeguards Laboratory (INSSL) aims to promote the development of research, education and training tools that support a wide range of global nuclear security and safeguards objectives.

INSSL is based within the Nuclear Science and Engineering program and led by Director Sukesh Aghara, Ph.D. The technical expertise at INSSL comes from faculty members in Nuclear and Science Engineering, Radiological Science and Applied Physics programs at UMass Lowell. The social science expertise comes from UMass Lowell's Center for Terrorism and Security Studies (CTSS).

The resources for the INSSL include: the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory, the home to the 1 MW research reactor and the 5 MV accelerator; the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC) and strategic partnerships with Canberra Laboratory.

This unique structure of the INSSL provides a platform for faculty, scientists and students to explore the interplay between technical and social science discipline associated with nuclear security.