All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Understanding Movies: Cinema as Social Commentary (Formerly 79.380)

Description

This film theory seminar has several main objectives: to study the production of meaning in films; to analyze how moving images are used in social representation; and to introduce students to the visual and critical language of cinema. In this course, we will view a series of films by international authors. These address some of the most pressing issues of today's global world such as identity, subjectivity, difference and otherness, race relations, representations of gender and sexuality, immigration, war, colonialism and post-colonialism, poverty, and social inequalities. The films that we watch will be studied not as isolated cinematic texts but as illustrations and examples of theories of representation. Students will develop their critical analysis skills by being introduced to theoretical concepts such as "the gaze" in art and cinema as well as formal elements such as mise-in-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 42.102 College Writing II, This is a 300 level course intended for Junior and Seniors.

Language of Video (formerly 70.242)

Description

An introductory course in video camera principles and editing functions. Utilizing writing and still photography, students will explore the language of video in both images and sound as they produce factual documents and/or personal fiction.

Interactive Media (formerly 70.278)

Description

This course provides students with the ability to create interactive motion graphics for Multimedia projects using Adobe Flash and Adobe After Effects. Students learn how to make sophisticated vector and pixel based graphics with basic action scripting and a variety of interactive graphic elements as well as compositing, editing, character rigging, effects for digital media and animation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARTS 1010, ARTS 1020, ARTS 1130, ARTS 2010, ARTS 1550, and ARTS 1560, or Instructor permission.

Crime and the Media (Formerly 44.223)

Description

This course provides an overview about how the media portrays crime and its impact on the general public, crime, and victims and offenders.

Introduction to Digital Media (Formerly JMS 100/DGMD 100)

Description

This foundational course is an introductory survey of the theory, history, structure, and function of mass communication in the United States.

Introduction to Telecommunications (Formerly JMS 102/DGMD 102)

Description

This is an introductory course in the field of journalism designed to introduce students to a survey of the radio and television industries, with an emphasis on their formation, growth, and change. The course examines the historical development of broadcasting as a vital component of American cultural identity, looking at the development of U.S. radio, television, and new media in the context of social and cultural change.

Screenwriting

Description

In this class students will be immersed in the art and craft of creating compelling stories for the screen in both fiction and nonfiction genres. As it has been said many times about media making, the story is the heart of media production. Students will develop screenwriting abilities through gaining knowledge of and experience with story conception and development: character development; story structure; dramatic action; dialogue; scene/sequence construction and writing for emotional impact.

Media, Law and Ethics (Formerly 41.237/DGMD 231)

Description

This course explores key legal issues likely to confront journalists, mass media professionals or students interested in learning more about the relationships between law, media and ethics in this global community. Nonetheless, students are challenged to think critically about the applicability of those issues to individuals and to media institutions that transmit information via spoken communications, writing, traditional media, mobile messages, social network sites, or e-mail messages.

Broadcast Engineering (Formerly DGMD 250)

Description

Students will learn the theory, system design and troubleshooting principles in current broadcast industry practices. Students will develop essential skills in communications, electronics and other technologies that are integrated and blended with production techniques in order to support production teams. Students will explore workflow, project management and leadership in order to facilitate large and small project and product development.

Video Production for Digital Media

Description

In this course students are going to understand the theory and practice of video production using a single digital camera for digital media through a mix of heavy hands-on practice and lectures. Students will be expected to understand; full digital camera operation and settings, audio control, basic directing, basic lighting, and basic editing intended for digital production. Students will also be expected to learn the terminology of video production/post-production intended for digital media.

Multimedia Storytelling (Formerly JMS 300/DGMD 300)

Description

This course will facilitate a deeper understanding of the uses of online and multimedia communication technologies in a democratic society and the impact of such technologies on the way we communicate The course will provide students with the opportunity to develop professional knowledge and skills with the tools used in online and multimedia creation. Students will develop a critical understanding of multiplatform and multimedia technologies and will learn how to use video, digital photography, audio, video, social networking and other new technologies.

Digital Editing

Description

This is an advanced course in digital editing. This course introduces you to the tools, techniques and language of digital editing in media production. The class will act as a hands-on production lab and cover the technical fundamentals for digital editing. This course is divided into two parts; practical and theoretical. In the theoretical part, we will discuss several editing terminology, concepts, and aesthetics. In addition, we will cover some basic rules of shooting (production) that is necessary for a good editing (post production). The other part is concerned with mastering the editing software, which is an editing program operating on Macintosh computers.

Digital Cinematography

Description

This course emphasizes the concepts needed to control the quality of images created, including such techniques as varying the frame rate, shutter speed, exposure, camera filters and color temperature. Topics covered will include camera operation, composition, framing, lens choice, camera movement, collaboration, blocking, continuity and all aspects of visual storytelling.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.2510 Video Prod for Digital Media, and DGMD.3100 Digital Editing.

Lighting Principles (Formerly JMS 340/DGMD 340)

Description

In this course students are going to understand the principles of lighting, its nature, its physical Characteristics, and its artistic role in media production. Class will have significant hands-on assignments and demonstrations beside theoretical background lectures. The concept will be developed based on a one-camera setting only. Students will work with light meters to guide their lighting schemes.

Blogging

Description

In this course students will learn the strategies and techniques that bloggers employ to create blog websites. They will analyze blogs across a range of categories and learn how to use online media more productively. Students will use web tools to create their own blog They will be working to crate domain names, email marketing, mobile responsive webpages, will use wordpress, thesis theme, woo themes. Students will learn about website and blog hosting solution and will be tracking blog statistics and results.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.1000 Introduction to Digital Media, and DGMD.1020 Introduction to Telecommunications.

Introduction to Digital Filmmaking

Description

In this course students are going to be introduced to the basics of production in film. Students will learn the visual language of film, filming with digital cameras, film production process, film production crew structure, basics of digital editing, interpersonal communication skills, and working as part of a team.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.3100 Digital Editing.

Production Management for Film

Description

In this course students are going to be introduced to the process of film production management from preproduction through production and screening. Students will learn budget management, crewing requirements, location needs, equipment rentals, and associated production costs.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.3501 Introduction to Digital Filmmaking.

Vlogging

Description

This class emphasizes the students participation as the on-camera host and performer in their videos. Students will develop their on-camera 'voice' and learn to refine their media literacy and production technique, through a consistent theme, content, character and visual style. Students will select a topic and use non-traditional video production techniques to create a series of four vlogs, each building in complexity. Students will create a media channel (YouTube or Vimeo page), post their work online and promote it using online media. Search results will be tracked.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.1000 Introduction to Digital Media, DGMD.2510 Video Production for Digital Media, DGMD.2200 Screenwriting.

Visual Motion Effects

Description

In this course, students are going to use After Effects as a tool to help them achieve a successful and visually convincing effect after going through idea generation process. Students will work on masking, cloning, and three-dimensional space with the aim of producing short productions. Familiarity with Photoshop is preferred.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.3100 Digital Editing, and DGMD.3501 Introduction to Digital Filmmaking.

Electronic News Gathering (ENG)

Description

In this class, students will explore the theory and practicum of gathering live video for news and live events as they happen. A look at live TV culture and the ethics of news organizations in relation to the media principles. FCC regulations and the 1st amendment will also be explored in order to gain a better understanding of how the media organizations must manage regulation with it's responsibility to report the news to the public. Emphasis will be on working with ENG cameras for the purpose of media coverage and reporting. Students will work collaboratively to produce segments of LIVE ENG reports.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.1020 Introduction to Telecommunications, DGMD.2510 Video Production for Digital Media, DGMD.3100 Digital Editing.

Directed Study in Digital Media (Formerly JMS 400/DGMD 400)

Description

Through frequent consultation with the instructor, the student carries out the investigation of a particularly specialized area of interest. This course may be repeated for up to a total of 6 credits.

TV Studio Production (Formerly JMS 410/DGMD 410)

Description

This course will offer you the opportunity to produce different types of live programs using digital technology. Plan, organise and direct TV studio-based broadcasting. Work effectively as part of a group. It provides a working knowledge of compositional, personal and organizational production skills in relation to the making of a live broadcast program using at least three cameras having in mind that you will cut/ edit form a camera to another without stopping. It requires collaboration, teamwork and strict, organized structures. In most cases, it requires leadership. But for everybody, personal qualities such as determination, enthusiasm and persistence are almost essential. So too is engaged participation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD 1000 Intro Journalism and Media Communication, or DGMD 3000 Multimedia Storytelling.

TV Sport Broadcasting

Description

In this course, students are going to learn the techniques and theory behind mobile TV production in regards to the professional sports industry. A look into the major sports of American culture and production techniques utilized to produce each. Environmental factors governing outdoor TV production as well as state and community government issues regarding the broadcast of each sport. In this course, students will be working in collaboration with UMass Lowell Athletic Department and will be involved with the Tsongas Arena sports activities through its Audio/Video department.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.2510 Video Prod for Digital Media, and DGMD.3100 Digital Editing.

Titles in Motion (Formerly DGMD 411)

Description

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the creative, visual and formal aspects of time-based communication and motion graphic design from both a contextual and technical point of view. Designers, with their comprehension of the principles of graphic design, typography and theories of visual communication will develop a knowledge and understanding of processes and techniques involved in creating time-based media including title sequence design. Projects introduce students to time-based visual communication environments. Unique conditions influencing the roles of storyboarding, planning, typography, graphics, symbolic systems, narrative, sound and time.

Podcasting

Description

In this class, students will create audio segments in the style of a Podcast, each executed with increasing complexity. Students will use the language of cinema, television, print, and the web. They will conduct research, scriptwriting, producing, location scouting, and organize scheduling. Students will use current technology to record a location-based audio program.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.1000 Introduction to Digital Media, and DGMD.1020 Introduction to Telecommunications.

Directing for Film

Description

In this course, student will work on spatial exploration, mise en scene, and directing the actor. Students will learn methods in scene study and improvisation beside rehearsal techniques, script breakdown and analysis. Students will have first hand experience of the role of director on set and beyond. Leadership and decision making are two qualities and major factors that play a crucial role in the progress of this class.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: DGMD.2200 Screenwriting, DGMD.3100 Digital Editing, DGMD.3501 Introduction to Digital Filmmaking.

Oral Communication (Formerly 42.222)

Description

Develops and applies the basic speaking skills that can be adapted to a variety of personal and professional contexts. Emphasis is placed on selection, analysis, organization and presentation of speech materials. Practice skills include listening, interviewing and the delivery and critique of extemporaneous speeches.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Technical and Scientific Communication (Formerly 42.226)

Description

Studies the theory and practice of letters, memoranda, reports and oral presentations on specific scientific and technical problems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Turning Fiction into Film (Formerly 42.232)

Description

Often when we encounter narratives (in the movies or in books) we tend to practice a "suspension of disbelief" letting the story unfold, following the conventions of film and fiction without question This course will direct our critical focus on the mechanisms through whic writers and filmmakers convey meaning to their audiences.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Intro to Journalism (Formerly 42.300)

Description

An introduction to techniques of writing for the news media.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL1020 College Writing II and ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Reviewing the Arts (Formerly 42.305)

Description

Theory and practice of writing short, critical essays in a journalistic mode on the visual and performing arts. Special attention to theater, movie, and television criticism. Conducted as a workshop with close analysis of student work.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Writing Popular Fiction (Formerly 42.310)

Description

This course is designed for students who are interested in writing in one or more of the popular forms of genre fiction: the mystery, the horror story, science fiction, fantasy, romance, and the thriller. Class time will be spent discussing and work-shopping student writing. Some time will also be devoted each week to brief lectures on practical matters like choosing between the short story and the novel, finding ideas, constructing plots, building characters, pacing, generating suspense, and marketing one's work. In addition, there will be assigned readings to illustrate the above.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Personal and Reflective Writing (Formerly 42.320)

Description

A workshop format encourages peer criticism of individual writings and discussion of models from various texts.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing.

Reading and Writing New Media (Formerly 42.369)

Description

This course will focus on learning how to write for electronic media and understanding the changing world of journalism.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: (ENGL 1020 College Writing College Writing II or HONR.1100) and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing).

Introduction to Editing and Publishing (Formerly 42.387)

Description

Designed for students considering a career in book publishing, this course provides an overview of the publishing industry. You will examine the stages of the book publishing process from acquisition to bound book or e-book, using assignments and examples from school, college, and trade book publishing. You will also consider the specific responsibilities of an editor. The course includes class visits by authors, editors, or publishing executives, as well as a trip to a local printing company.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Creative Writing Fiction II (Formerly 42.407)

Description

Creative Writing Fiction II

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 42.302 Creative Writing: Fiction.

Making an Historical Documentary (Formerly 43.348)

Description

This course provides students with the basic conceptual and technical skills for developing and completing an historical documentary, including instruction about subject choice, narrative structure, camera work, and editing.

American Media and Politics (Formerly 46.212)

Description

This course explores the role of the media in American politics and the role of politics in the American media. We focus first on the historical evolution of newspapers, radio, television, and the internet as vehicles of political news reporting. Next, we look at instances of journalistic bias and distortion in order to explore how corporate consolidation and commercial competition have affected the news industry. Finally, by studying a selection of major stories in depth, we will gain a better understanding of the factors involved in the conversion of political events and developments into seemingly significant news.

Politics of the Internet (Formerly 46.222)

Description

This course will examine the influence social media and web connectivity have had on political campaigns, campaign fundraising, political mobilization, and the recent proliferation of democratic movements.

Politics and Film (Formerly 46.316)

Description

Analysis of the role of film in creating, expressing, revealing, and responding to social and political ideas and values. Examines a variety of film and film styles and introduces students to elements of film theory, the theory of popular culture and the role of film in forming our ideas about the world.

SMR: Political communication and Media Studies (Formerly 46.422)

Description

Advanced study in contemporary issues in Political Communication and Media Studies.