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Advisor Toolkit

Tools for Advisors

Tools for Advisors

The Advising Center is located within SiS and provides a summary of information on your advisees. The following resources will help you navigate SiS:
Scheduled UCA Meeting Dates and Topics
The University Council of Advisors (UCA) - UMass Lowell’s University Council of Advisors is comprised of faculty, professional advisors, staff and administrators who work collaboratively to support the success of our undergraduate students. Each college has representatives on the UCA which aims to support sharing institutional information and to support the campus wide advising partnerships.
Spring Semester University Council of Advisors Meetings(all meetings 2-3:30 p.m.)

Feb. 11, 2019 - University Crossing 260

- NEW Financial Aid Portal and Tips presented by Someris Rivera, Senior Associate Director of Financial Aid
- River Hawk Review Program presented by Dr. Fred Martin, Associate Dean of Student Success in the Kennedy College of Sciences

March 5, 2019 - ETIC Perry Atrium

- Mental Health First Aid presented by Melissa Wall, Program Director of Student Mental Health and Wellness
- River Hawk Scholars Academy Updates presented by Dr. Matt Hurwitz, Director of the River Hawk Scholars Academy
- Training and Development Taskforce Updates by Jen Keene-Crouse, Coordinator of Student Success and Todd Borchers, Coordinator of Advising & Tutoring Services
- Transfer Student Task Force Updates by Kristen Rhyner, Associate Director of Academic Services and Transfer Support, and Dr. Ed. Hajduk, Associate Chair and Teaching Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Francis College of Engineering

April 11, 2019 - University Crossing, 260

- Student Conduct and Title IV presented by Kate Legee, Associate Director of Student Conduct and Prevention

May 7, 2019 - University Crossing, 260

- End of Academic Year Celebration and Reflections

Contact Information

The Council of Advisors is chaired by:

Please reach out to any of the chairs with any questions.

Fall Faculty and Staff Academic Advisor Professional Development Opportunities

DateCouncil of Advisors Sponsored OpportunitiesTime/Location
Feb. 6, 2019WEBINAR: Incorporating Coaching Conversations into Academic Advising2-3 p.m. in University Crossing, 158
Feb. 15, 2019Kennedy College of Sciences Faculty Advising Blueprint9 a.m.-noon in Olney 522
March 5, 2019You Are Not So Smart: Academic Advising Edition2-3 p.m. in University Crossing, 260
March 8, 2019Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Faculty Blueprint9 a.m.-noon in 820 Broadway Dean's Conference Room
March 21, 2019Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Faculty Blueprint
1-4 p.m. in 820 Broadway Dean's Conference Room
March 25, 2019Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences Faculty Blueprint9 a.m.-noon in 820 Broadway Dean's Conference Room
April 18, 2019Academic Advising in an Era of Instant Gratification: The Pathway to Empowerment2-3 p.m. in University Crossing, 260
May 21, 2019Academic Advising and Anger: Keeping Advisors and Students Safe2-3 p.m. in University Crossing, 260

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a faculty Blueprint? The session will cover the literature and research on the field of academic advising and the important role that faculty advisors plan in regards to supporting student development. The topic of developmental advising will be unpacked and put into context of a faculty advisor advising session

Special attention will be given to reports available in department center that contain pertinent student information as well as the ins and outs of advising when it comes to SiS, Faculty Center, Advisement Reports, and Degree Pathways.

Incorporating Coaching Conversations into Academic Advising Practice:  As explained in the “Academic Coaching” section of the NACADA Clearinghouse of Academic Advising Resources, coaching is an advising approach that can empower the student to reflect and act upon the range of goals, interests, and passions available in higher education, and academic advisors may incorporate coaching methods into their practice in order to address the whole student. Through coaching, students can develop their abilities to think critically, solve problems, overcome personal obstacles, discover their strengths, and generally make the most of their college experiences. Although the research on coaching is still new, it suggests that coaching can also support the kind of student engagement that leads to retention and completion – move them from just “surviving” to actually “thriving” in school. In this webinar, sponsored by the NACADA Academic Coaching Advising Community, participants will learn about the basic premises of coaching, see a short coaching demonstration video, and encounter several models for implementing coaching in a higher education setting. The Presenters will share key coaching concepts and stories of educators who have successfully implemented coaching on their campuses in unique ways. Attendees will discover the value of utilizing coaching with students, hear about one model for coaching conversations, and have an opportunity to think of ways they might implement coaching on their campuses. Academic Advising Core Competencies that will be addressed in this presentation include:

C4 – Understanding of academic advising approaches and strategies

C5 – Understanding of expected outcomes of academic advising

R2 – Ability to create rapport and build academic advising relationships

R4 – Ability to plan and conduct successful advising interactions

R6 – Ability to facilitate problem-solving, decision-making, meaning-making, planning, and goal setting

You Are Not So Smart: Academic Advising Edition: At the 2017 NACADA Annual Conference, “Best of Region 10” presenters Gina Beyer and Amanda Voight (Arizona State University) drew over 200 enthusiastic attendees to their presentation entitled, You Are Not So Smart: Advising Edition. Participants described it as energetic, funny, and engaging, as well as informative, and encouraged that it be taken to a wider audience.

In this webinar, drawing from concepts introduced in David McRaney’s 2012 bestselling book, You Are Not So Smart, Gina and Amanda will discuss these concepts’ relevance to the work academic advisors do with students. They will take participants on an adventure through their brains, demonstrating how easy it is for us to fall prey to ways our minds work, including biases and logical fallacies in the context of education. They will show how these natural workings of our brains can affect our daily lives and create social and psychological challenges, and they will share tips and tricks on how to work through the challenges of the human mind to improve student learning.

Imagine an emotionally charged, highly resistant third-year student who was doing okay for semesters but is now failing most of her courses and has to come to your office to register for classes. The student doesn’t appear to like you or the university. What might be going on in the student’s brain? In yours? How will you help her? Gina and Amanda will use interactive case studies so participants can apply their new insights to create solutions for some of their most challenging student interactions.

Academic Advising Core Competencies that will be addressed in this presentation include:

R2 – Ability to create rapport and build academic advising relationships 

R3 – Ability to communicate in an inclusive and respectful manner 

R4 – Ability to plan and conduct successful advising interactions 

R5 – Ability to promote student understanding of the logic and purpose of the curriculum 

R6 – Ability to facilitate problem solving, decision-making, meaning-making, planning, and goal-setting

Academic Advising in an Era of Instant Gratification: The Pathway to Empowerment: The rise of the digital age has brought transformation at both the individual and societal levels. With constantly changing forms of technology literally at our fingertips, we must continually learn new ways to access information and connect with one another. This 24/7 access to people and things all over the world with a simple click of a button has given rise to a culture of instant gratification. Expectations of rapid response have increased demands on education professionals, who are required to evolve with their students and “meet them where they are” whenever possible. Advising personnel daily face new challenges to meet student needs and often feel pressured to move at a pace that may feel too rapid to produce optimal outcomes.

How can advisors do their best for students in an era of instAdvising? How can advisors foster development of effective decision-making and problem-solving skills when there is so much emphasis on speed and efficiency? How can advisors juggle setting appropriate boundaries and managing student expectations in ways that are healthy for all, while still meeting the expectations of their institutions?

In this Webinar, three advisors who received outstanding accolades for their presentations on this topic at the 2017 NACADA Annual Conference team up to share their ideas and expertise. They will discuss ways that advisors and their students experience the phenomenon of instant gratification in their educational settings. They will share strategies to create advising relationships that facilitate learning and foster student empowerment. And they will consider tools that can utilize instant gratification to help students stay on track and feel more investment in the work advisors do with them. Participants will leave with a resource packet that they will be able to utilize with their colleagues and refer to when working with students on their own campuses.

Academic Advising Core Competencies that will be addressed in this presentation include:

C4 – Understanding of academic advising approaches and strategies

I5 – Knowledge of the characteristics, needs, and experiences of major and emerging student populations

R2 – Ability to create rapport and build academic advising relationships

R4 – Ability to plan and conduct successful advising interactions

R6 – Ability to facilitate problem solving, decision-making, meaning-making, planning, and goal-setting

Academic Advising and Anger: Keeping Advisors and Students Safe: Academic advising professionals know that there may be times when they are called upon to work with students who are frustrated or angry. The American College Health Assessment survey in 2017 reported that in a 12-month period 44% of college students surveyed said they had felt overwhelming anger. Not all students are able to express their concerns and frustrations openly or in a safe manner. Some may communicate hostility in a passive way; others may express themselves in a way that feels threatening to the advisor. How can advisors recognize warning signs, even if passive, that a student is angry? How can advisors help a student while defusing their frustration?

In May 2017, this team brought their presentation of When Students are Sad and Stay Sad: Best Practices in Advising Students with Depression to the NACADA Webinar audience. Enthusiastic participants described it as “the best webinar I have attended” and requested to hear more from this team. In response to popular demand, our Presenters return to share their ideas and expertise for strategies to help advisors stay safe when working with a student who is openly or passively angry. Video clips of advising sessions will be shown, and the Presenters will offer suggestions for recognizing angry students. They will provide strategies to calm a student and share possible plans to keep both advisor and student safe in the advising situation.

This webinar will assist viewers in developing Academic Advising Core Competencies from both the Informational and Relational components. For example, advisers need to know, understand, and have a plan to implement the rules, procedures, and regulations of their institutions when it comes to advisor and student safety (I-3). Being aware of the behavioral proclivities of students and issues that may lead to closed or open aggression involves core competencies I-5 (knowledge of the characteristics, needs, and experiences of major and emerging student populations), as well as R-6 (the ability to facilitate problem solving, decision-making, meaning-making, planning, and goal setting). The skills an advisor may need in order to calm a student and/or defuse an angry student may fall within the scope of R-2 (the ability to create rapport and build academic advising relationships), R-3 (the ability to communicate in an inclusive and respectful manner), and/or R-4 (the ability to plan and conduct successful advising interactions).

NACADA

NACADA promotes and supports quality academic advising in institutions of higher education to enhance the educational development of students. NACADA provides a forum for discussion, debate, and the exchange of ideas pertaining to academic advising through numerous activities and publications.