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Why is it important to have more women faculty in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)?

We are an increasingly technology-dependent world, and STEM skills are vital in keeping America globally competitive. It is critical that we allow all available interest and potential to flourish. Yet of the more than 8.6 million STEM-related jobs predicted for 2018, the National Math and Science Initiative warns that as many as three million of those jobs might be unfilled.

To close that gap, it is crucial to address the persistent barriers to women entering careers in STEM. A critical piece of this challenge is to transform the academy. Nationally, women earn 41% of the doctorates in STEM fields today, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields. At UMass Lowell in 2017, of the 431 tenure-track faculty, 44% percent are in Science and Engineering, and 60% are in Science, Engineering and SBS.