CMINDS

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CMINDS Researchers Recognized for their International Collaborative Research in Big Data in the Life Sciences

Prof. MegherbiProf. Megherbi of CMINDS recently received recognition from International Research Partnership and Collaboration in big data analytics and its application in the life sciences,    personalized  and translational medicine. The national and international collaborative research findings,  related to comparison of RNA-seq and microarray data from large samples treated with diverse toxic drugs that highlights a dependency of cross-platform concordance on treatment effect,  were published in an article titled “The concordance between RNA-seq and microarray data depends on chemical treatment and transcript abundance”,  which recently appeared in Nature Biotechnology. Ultimately, one of the broader impacts of these studies and research findings will enable RNA-seq to be applied more broadly in analyzing large cohorts for discovery research and clinical use.

CMINDS Research Group Presents Some of  Their Research  Findings  at  The  IEEE International Conference, in May 2014.

Prof. maghrebi and three of her graduate studentsProf. Megherbi and three of her graduate students, Ph.D student  Paul Beaulieu, Ph.D student Julie Bluementhal, and  MS thesis student Amanda  Myers presented their research findings work in the Pattern Object Recognition, Machine Vision and Intelligence field, the Bio-Medical Imaging field, and the Real-Time Video Face Detection, Tracking, and Recognition field at the IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Virtual Environments for Measurement Systems and Applications, in May 2014.

Collaborative Research Between CMINDS and Massachusetts Local Industry

Prof. Dalila Megherbi and her graduate student Julie Blumenthal, from the CMINDS center, have been working with a local Massachusetts company, Grow Tech Inc., in the biomedical imaging field. Megherbi and Blumenthal have been conducting research using computational intelligence techniques to detect, classify and predict plant stress and plant diseases before symptoms become visible to the human eye. The goal of the research is to help the agriculture industry provide early intervention aimed at avoiding crop damage catastrophes, therefore saving millions of dollars. The CMINDS and Grow Tech team have been invited to present its research findings at the IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Virtual Environments for Measurement Systems and Applications, in May 2014.


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Plant stress signatures

CMINDS Research Recognized at 2013 IEEE International Conference 

CTSOn Nov. 12, 2013, Professor Dalila Megherbi and her student Iliana Voynichka were honored at their IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST) for their work mentioned in Researchers Focus on Facial Recognition System for Homeland Security. Their work was presented in their paper titled “Analysis of the Effects of Image Transformation, Template Selection, and Partial Information on Face Recognition with Time-Varying Expressions For Homeland Security Applications.” Their paper won the “Best Paper Award” for all of the HST.  

CMINDS Research in Homeland Security Relates to Boston Bombing

The Boston Marathon attack is a timely and painful reminder of the importance of developing accurate, reliable facial recognition algorithms. Some recent research at the CMINDS has been focusing on facial recognition, especially with time-varying facial expressions and/or disguises, which are crucial in many homeland security applications. 

In particular, in this research work Prof. Megherbi and her student, Iliana Voychnika, show the effects on facial recognition accuracy of some seleted factors including image facial registration with or without off-the-plane image rotation, the type and number of individual’s face template(s) selection, and the type and increasing amounts of partial facial information contained in face images. Professor Megherbi and her student have been invited to present these findings and related experimental results at the IEEE Homeland Security Conference in Fall 2013.

More News

helal-dissertation-proposalPh.D Thesis Proposal Defense: On May 21, 2014 2013, Mr. Helal Saghir, defended his Ph.D dissertation proposal, in Computer Engineering,  titled “Big Data Biology-Based Predictive Models for Metagenomics Binning”. Members of his thesis committee are Prof. Kanti Prasad, Prof. Oliver Ibe, and Prof. Dalila B. Megherbi (Thesis advisor).





Prof. Kanti Prasad becomes a Fellow of the ASEE Society, 2013.

Thesis Defense: In September 2013, Ms. Amanda Myers, defended her MS thesis titled “Areal-time Method For Facial Detection, Tracking, and Recognition “.

Thesis Defense: On July 26, 2013, Mr. Paul Beaulieu defended his MS thesis titled “A Study of the Effect of Feature Reduction By Selecting the Significant Pixels For Object Representation, Classification and Prediction.”

Thesis Defense: On March 27, 2013, Ms. Iliana Voynichka defended her MS thesis titled: “Analysis of The Effects of Image Registration, Template selection, and Partial Information Compilation of Facial Recognition Accuracy.”

In October 2012, Prof. Megherbi was invited to the FDA-lead international collaborative project Conference to discuss and to share research results found at the CMINDS research center, Spring 2012, SAS headquarters, North Carolina.

In November 2011, Prof. Megherbi presented the first concept/need of Multi-Agent Distributed Dynamic Scheduling for Monitoring and Surveillance of Large Distributed Critical Key Infrastructures and Resources (CKIR) that span thousands of miles, at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technology for Homeland Security.

In May 2011, Prof. Megherbi was invited to the FDA-lead international collaborative project conference to discuss and to share research results found at the CMINDS research center, UMass Lowell, Spring 2011, SAS headquarters, North Carolina.

In May 2010, Prof. Megherbi was invited to the FDA-lead international collaborative project conference to discuss and share research results found at the CMINDS research center, UMass Lowell, Spring 2010. NIH/FDA headquarters, D.C.

In June 2007, The CMINDS graduated the first Ph.D. in Computer Engineering, within the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UMass Lowell, Dr. Carlos Bejar, who currently holds a position at Motorola.