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National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture Summer Teacher Workshops

National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American
History and Culture Teacher Workshop

The Tsongas Industrial History Center, a partnership of UMass Lowell's College of Education and Lowell National Historical Park, invites educators to join us virtually in Lowell, MA, for our National Endowment for the Humanities -sponsored Landmarks of American History and Culture Summer Teacher Workshops.

In the summer of 2021, we will host TWO workshops:

  1. our postponed summer 2020 workshop, “Labor and Landscape: Lowell as Nineteenth-Century Crucible”
  2. our new 2021 workshop, “Social Movements and Reform in Industrializing America: The Lowell Experience”

Teachers selected to participate receive a stipend of $1,300 at the end of the workshop session.

The deadline to apply is March 15, 2021.

NOTE: Educators who previously applied to participate in the "Labor and Landscape" program when it was scheduled to be offered during summer 2020 do not have to complete a new application. If you would like to withdraw your application from consideration, please e-mail NEH_Lowell@uml.edu.

TitleDatesDescription
“Labor and Landscape: Lowell as Nineteenth-Century Crucible”June 27 - July 2, 2021 or July 11 - 16, 2021
(Choose one week)
In “Labor and Landscape,” educators build content knowledge and pedagogical skills through a study of Lowell as an environmental “crucible.”
We use synchronous and pre-recorded elements to engage educators in talks, tours, and discussions where we consider nineteenth-century textile manufacturing as a moment when multiple ways of using nature collided.
We look at ways of labor and meaning of landscape for the Merrimack Valley’s Native Americans, for enslaved people in the Deep South, and for “Yankee” farm families on New England’s rural homesteads.
We study the transformation of raw cotton into finished cloth by a changing array of wage laborers in Lowell.
We also locate the origins of American environmental concern, social protest, and regulatory policy in the reaction to widespread environmental disruption and ever-worsening pollution associated with textile and other factories.
“Social Movements and Reform in Industrializing America: The Lowell Experience“July 25 - 30, 2021 or Aug 1 - 6, 2021 (Choose one week)In “Social Movements and Reform,” educators investigate Lowell’s textile industry as a case study of early 19th-century industrialization and reform.
We use synchronous and pre-recorded elements to tap the landmark resources of Lowell National Historical Park and other cultural/historical sites as we examine changes in work, society, and culture between 1820 and 1860.
Educators learn about changes that led Lowellians, imbued with the ideals of the natural rights tradition, to engage in labor reform, women’s rights, and antislavery movements.
We also look at nativism as a reactionary reform movement. An industrial city that formed the template for later industrial cities in the U.S., Lowell provides an ideal setting for historical inquiry.
Through lectures, discussion, hands-on and field investigations, drama, and close study of primary, secondary, and literary sources, educators gain useful content knowledge and new pedagogical approaches.

We hope you will apply to participate in our workshops!
Sincerely,
Sheila Kirschbaum
Director, Tsongas Industrial History Center
An education partnership of Lowell National Historical Park and the UMass Lowell Graduate School of Education