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Elizabeth Herbin-Triant

Elizabeth Herbin Triant
Elizabeth Herbin-TriantAssistant Professor
  • CollegeCollege of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
  • DepartmentHistory
  • Phone(978) 934-4273
  • OfficeDugan Hall - 106F
  • EmailElizabeth_HerbinTriant@uml.edu

Education

  • Ph D: History, (2007), Columbia University - New York, NY
  • MA: History, (2001), Columbia University - New York, NY
  • BA: History & Literature, (1999), Harvard College - Cambridge, MA

Biography

Elizabeth Herbin-Triant is a United States historian with particular interests in the South and African-American history. Her current research explores campaigns for residential segregation in North Carolina in the early twentieth century. Other research interests include African-American migration within the U.S. and emigration to Liberia, segregationist ideas in South Africa, the Harlem Renaissance, and agrarianism in the American South. Before joining the faculty at UMass Lowell, Professor Herbin-Triant taught at St. John's University in New York and held a postdoctoral fellowship in Agrarian Studies at Yale University. Her essays have appeared in publications including The Washington Post, The Journal of Southern History, and Agricultural History.

Awards and Honors

  • History Department’s Teaching Award, 2015-16 (2016), Teaching - UMass Lowell
  • Fellowship in Agrarian Studies, 2007-08 (2007), Scholarship/Research - Yale University, New Haven, CT
  • Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities, 2006-07 (2006), Scholarship/Research - Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation

Publications

  • Herbin-Triant, E. (2017) "Race and Class Friction in North Carolina Neighborhoods: How Campaigns for Residential Segregation Law Divided Middling and Elite Whites in Winston-Salem and North Carolina’s Countryside, 1912-1915," Journal of Southern History 83:3 pp. 531-72
  • Herbin-Triant, E. (2013) "Southern Segregation, South Africa-Style: Maurice Evans, Clarence Poe, and the Ideology of Rural Segregation," Agricultural History 87:2 pp. 170-193