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Southeast Asians In New England

Southeast Asians In New England

Hai B. Pho, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell. Pho specializes in Southeast Asian politics, Vietnamese history and civilization, international relations, US foreign policy and refugee policy.

Featured Speaker

Friday, July 28, 10:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in O'Leary 222 (61 Wilder Street, Lowell, MA)

Hai B. Pho, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Political Science, University of Massachusetts Lowell. Pho specializes in Southeast Asian politics, Vietnamese history and civilization, international relations, US foreign policy and refugee policy. He is a founding Board Member and Program Coordinator for the Indochinese Refugee Foundation, which played a central role in resettling refugees in Lowell. He has served on the Massachusetts Governor’s Advisory Council on Refugees (for former Governor Dukakis) and on Diversity and Pluralism Taskforce for the University of Massachusetts President’s Office. His publications include “The Politics of Refugee Resettlement in Massachusetts” (1991) and “Lowell, Politics, and the Resettlement of Southeast Asian Refugees and Immigrants” (2007).

Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, Ph.D., is Professor of English and Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut.

Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, Ph.D., is Professor of English and Director of the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. Her work is rooted in her personal history marked by immigration, migration, and diaspora, as a Cambodian American scholar. Her book, "War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work" (University of Minnesota Press, 2012) explores the remembrance work of 1.5-generation Cambodian American cultural producers through film, memoir, and music whose background lies in the narrative of war, genocide, and denied justice in Cambodia. Her numerous publications include “From the Mekong to the Merrimack and Back: The Transnational Terrains of Cambodian American Rap” (2016); “Re-Seeing Cambodia and Recollecting The ’Nam: A Vertiginous Critique of the Military Sublime” (2016); and ““Evincing Cambodia’s Genocide: Juridical Belatedness, Historical Indictment, and Rithy Panh’s The Missing Picture” (2016). She currently serves as the President of the national Association for Asian American Studies.

Eric Tang, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and faculty member in the Center for Asian American Studies at the University Texas at Austin. Photo by Kevin Nguyen

Eric Tang, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the African and African Diaspora Studies Department and faculty member in the Center for Asian American Studies at the University Texas at Austin. His first book, entitled "Unsettled: Cambodian Refugees in the NYC Hyperghetto" (2015), is an ethnographic account of refugee life in some of New York City’s most impoverished and socially marginalized neighborhoods. A former community organizer, Tang has published several articles on race and urban social movements, including award-winning writing on post-Katrina New Orleans.

Richard T. Chu, Ph.D., is Five-College Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is the author of Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture 1860s–1930s (2010; 2012) and Chinese Merchants of Binondo during the Late Nineteenth Century (2010).

Richard T. Chu, Ph.D., is Five-College Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is the author of "Chinese and Chinese Mestizos of Manila: Family, Identity, and Culture 1860s–1930s" (2010; 2012) and "Chinese Merchants of Binondo during the Late Nineteenth Century" (2010). Apart from his work on the Chinese diaspora in the Philippines, he has also published a demographic study of the Filipinos/Filipino Americans in Boston/Massachusetts. In Spring 2017, he taught a course on Asian/Pacific/American history with a civic engagement component, and is currently part of a team of UMass Amherst professors writing up a sociological report on the Bhutanese, Filipino, and Vietnamese communities in Springfield and Western Massachusetts. He teaches courses on the Chinese diaspora, Philippines, U.S. empire in the Pacific, and Asian/Pacific/America.

Phitsamay Uy

Phitsamay Sychitkokhong Uy, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. Her research focuses on immigrant students, particularly Southeast Asian educational experiences and parent/community engagement. She is a Core Faculty for the Center for Asian American Studies at UMass Lowell, where she will start her tenure as Co-Director in Fall 2017. She has served on the editorial boards of "Harvard Educational Review," "Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement," and the "Journal of Lao Studies." Uy has been involved in various community boards of directors including Southeast Asia Resource Action Center Center, Asian American Resource Workshop, Chea Uy Trust Fund, Institute of Asian American Studies at University of Massachusetts Boston, Legacies of War National Steering Committee, and the Nisei Student Relocation Commemorative Fund.

Sarath Suong is a co-founder and Executive Director of Providence Youth Student Movement (PrYSM).

Sarath Suong is a co-founder and Executive Director of Providence Youth Student Movement (PrYSM). Born in the Thai refugee camp Khao I Dang, Suong and his family fled Cambodia during the civil war and immigrated to his hometown of Revere, Massachusetts. He moved to Providence, Rhode Island in 1998 to attend Brown University, majoring in Ethnic Studies with a specific focus on Southeast Asian American immigration and resistance. To cope with the violence, pain, and injustices facing Southeast Asians, he became a community organizer, centered around the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality.