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Bridging Policy & Research

Bridging Policy & Research

Katrina Dizon Mariateague currently serves as the Immigration Policy Manager for the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC).

Featured Speakers

Thursday, July 27, 8:45 - 10:30 a.m. in O'Leary 222 (61 Wilder Street, Lowell, MA)

Katrina Dizon Mariategue currently serves as the Immigration Policy Manager for the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC). In this capacity, she works with community-based organizations and national advocates to uplift the narratives of family and community members directly impacted by mass incarceration, deportation, and criminalization, to congressional leaders and key administrative agencies in Washington, D.C. Previously, Dizon Mariateague worked for six years at the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) — the largest federation of labor unions in the country. In 2011, she was elected to serve as D.C. chapter president of the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), the only national Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) union membership organization. In this capacity, she led the chapter’s local advocacy campaigns and organizing work around immigrant workers’ rights, coordinated civic engagement programs for the 2012 elections, and strengthened local networks through extensive coalition building efforts. She also served on APALA’s National Executive Board and co-chaired the organization’s Young Leaders Council.

Channapha Khamvongsa is founder and executive director of Legacies of War, an organization that seeks to address the problem of unexploded ordnance in Laos, to provide space for healing the wounds of war, and to create greater hope for a future of peace.

Channapha Khamvongsa is founder and executive director of Legacies of War, an organization that seeks to address the problem of unexploded ordnance in Laos, to provide space for healing the wounds of war, and to create greater hope for a future of peace. The organization uses art, culture, education, and community organizing, especially among the Lao diaspora, to create healing and transformation out of the wreckage of war. Legacies of War has successfully advocated for an increase in U.S. funding for bomb clearance in Laos, from an annual average of $2M in 2008 to $30M in 2016. In September 2016, President Barack Obama acknowledged Khamvongsa’s advocacy efforts in Laos, where he became the first U.S. President to visit the country. Khamvongsa has written and spoken widely about the secret war in Laos and its aftermath and has appeared in the New York Times, Democracy Now!, CNN, ABC, PBS and CBS News. She previously worked at the Ford Foundation and NEO Philanthropy on immigrant rights, civil society, civic engagement, capacity building, and transformational leadership. She has served on the Seattle Women’s Commission, as well as on the boards of the Refugee Women’s Alliance and the Conference on Asian Pacific American Leadership (CAPAL).

Khanh Dinh

Khanh T. Dinh, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of Massachusetts Lowell. Dinh’s primary areas of academic interests are in clinical and community psychology. She is particularly interested in the effects of cultural changes and stress on the adaptation of immigrant individuals and families, including both health and mental health outcomes. Her research work has been published in various academic journals, such as American Journal of Community Psychology, Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Journal of Family Psychology, Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies, and Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. She is recipient of the NIH Health Disparities Service Award and NIMH National Research Service Award. She has served as consultant for the National Institute of Mental Health and Health Resources and Services Administration, and currently a member of the Editorial Board of the Asian American Journal of Psychology.