Daniel Sandman

Daniel Sandman, Chemistry, Center for Advanced Materials, Nanomanufacturing Center of Excellence

Daniel Sandman, Chemistry, Center for Advanced Materials, Nanomanufacturing Center of Excellence

Professor, Associate Director
Phone:
978-934-3835
Fax:
978-934-3013
Office:
Olney Hall 216B

Expertise

Organic & materials chemistry; synthesis & physico-chemical study of organic & polymeric conjugated materials; solid state polymerization

Research Interest

Synthesis and physico-chemical study of organic, organometallic, and polymeric materials, especially those of interest for electrical and optical phenomena associated with delocalized electronic structures; solid state polymerization; use of sugar reagents for the synthesis of conjugated materials; organic and polymeric materials with unusual properties at the nanoscale; devices based on conjugated polymers.

Educational Background

B.S., (Chemistry) Drexel University, 1964; M.A., (Chemistry) Princeton University, 1966; Ph.D., (Chemistry) Princeton University, 1968

Biosketch

Daniel J. Sandman received the Ph.D. at Princeton University studying with Professor Kurt Mislow on optical activity in rigid homoconjugated systems. He worked with Professor Robert West at the University of Wisconsin Madison as a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow in the area of novel structural types in organosilicon and –germanium chemistry. He did postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania with Professors Anthony Garito (deceased) and Alan J. Heeger. This work resulted in the discovery of organic metals, and Sandman is a pioneer of the modern study of electrical, magnetic, and optical phenomena in organic and polymeric solids. From 1973-1979, he was employed at Xerox Corporation where he was involved in research on organic conductors and photoconductors. From 1979-1992, he was employed at GTE Laboratories. Here he held a management position as senior staff scientist and carried out research on novel synthetic approaches to organoselenium and –tellurium materials and in the use of solid state polymerization as an approach to polydiacetylenes with useful nonlinear optical properties.In 1992, he joined University of Massachusetts Lowell. He functions as Associate Director of the Center for Advanced Materials and carries out research in organic and materials chemistry. He is involved in teaching first year, organic, and materials chemistry courses. He also supervise the cumulative examination programs in polymer science and organic chemistry.