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Xiaoxia Newton

Xiaoxia Newton faculty bio headshot photo
Xiaoxia Newton, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education

Research Interest

Application of multilevel modeling analysis in educational research and evaluation; Logic modeling approach to program evaluation and research; STEM majors' mathematical content understanding; Inquiry approach to mathematics and science teaching.

Educational Background

Ph.D., University of California Los Angeles

M.A. & B.A., Tsinghua University, Bejing, China

Biosketch

Xiaoxia Newton is an Associate Professor in the Research Methods and Evaluation program at UMass Lowell's Graduate School of Education. She has extensive methodological training from UCLA Social Research Methodology division of the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. She has applied a wide variety of methodologies studying several key components of the mathematics education system (classroom teaching and learning, teacher preparation and professional development) and investigating several broader contextual issues (e.g., teacher turnover, accountability using VAM) in the US at both the K-12 and higher education context. Her current work focuses on pre-service Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors' mathematical content understanding for teaching K-12 students. In addition, using evaluation research as an important research and development (R&D) tool, she is extending her research to investigate whether or not teaching scientific inquiry to undergraduate STEM majors would equip them with the skills to feel comfortable teaching mathematical and scientific concepts using an inquiry approach at the middle and high school level.

Before coming back to academia, Newton worked as a senior research analyst in the Program Evaluation and Research Branch of the Los Angeles Unified School District, the second largest public school districts in the US. In that capacity, she directed several evaluation projects, including a five-year evaluation of the District Math Initiative and interacted with diverse stakeholder groups such as school board members, administrators at the district and school levels, program directors and staff members, and math coaches and teachers at the schools. She holds a Bachelor and Masters of Art in English from Tsinghua University (Beijing, China) and a doctorate degree in education with an emphasis on research methods and evaluation from UCLA.