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News from UMass Lowell

Expert Sources, Story Ideas and Ready-to-Go Content

UML Education Assoc. Prof. Jill Lohmeier Photo by Adrien Bisson
Associate Professor Jill Lohmeier

09/21/2021

This is a selection of source and story ideas compiled by UMass Lowell media relations. We are available to assist with these as well as any other source or content needs.

Sources
UMass Lowell experts are available to discuss:
  • How the remainder of hurricane season could impact New England and what a new “Category 6” warning for treacherous storms would mean;
  • The strategy behind HBO’s decision to pull its content from Amazon Prime and the future of the streaming industry.
Contact UMass Lowell media relations if you need an expert source on any subject.

Content Ideas
The stories below were developed by UMass Lowell and may be used as a press release or in their entirety. Contact UMass Lowell media relations to arrange interviews or for high-res photos.

Researcher: Science education can help slow climate change
People who understand how human behavior affects the climate can make more environmentally sound decisions, says Jill Lohmeier, a School of Education associate professor who, through the Cool Science initiative, studies how children’s art can raise awareness of the issues. Cool Science involves K-12 students and members of the community to address climate challenges across the country. She talks about the project and how UMass Lowell students and others can get involved. See the full story.

Nutrition professor finds major gaps in bone-health research
Many people think of osteoporosis as a disease that primarily affects white women, thinning their bones to fragility and causing painful fractures of the spine, hips and wrists as they age. The reality is different – and shows how much researchers don’t yet know about who is affected and why, according to Biomedical and Nutritional Sciences Assistant Prof. Sabrina Noel, whose team has been analyzing data and conducting focus groups among Latino populations in Boston and Lawrence. See the full story.