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Teresa Gonzales


Teresa Gonzales is an Assistant Professor in the College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences in the Sociology Department.
Teresa Irene GonzalesAssistant Professor
  • College
    College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Department
    Sociology
  • Phone
    (978) 934-4362
  • Office
    Dugan Hall - 2nd Floor
  • Email

Research Interests

Community and Urban Studies; Local Economic Development & Race in the U.S.; Race, Ethnicity, & Civic Engagement; Gentrification; U.S. Welfare State; Organizations; Poverty; Qualitative Methods; Networks; Nonprofits; Grassroots Movements; Gender, Race, and Community Organizing; Adult Play.

Education

  • Ph D: Sociology, (2014), University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley, CA
    Dissertation/Thesis Title: Team work to make the dream work: The New Communities’ Program, interorganizational networks, and community economic development in two Chicago neighborhoods
  • MA: Sociology, (2009), University of California, Berkeley - Berkeley, CA
  • BA: Latin American & Latina/o Studies, (2007), Smith College - Northampton, MA
  • : General Education, (2004), City Colleges of Chicago, Harold Washington Campus - Chicago, IL

Selected Awards and Honors

  • Career Enhancement Fellowship (2017), Scholarship/Research - The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation & the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
  • Research Associate (2017), Scholarship/Research - Five College Women's Studies Research Center
  • Sage Teaching Innovations & Professional Development Award (2014), Teaching - American Sociological Assocation Section on Teaching & Learning

Selected Publications

  • Gonzales, T. (2017). Two sides of the same coin: The New Communities’ Program, grassroots organizations, and leadership development within two Chicago neighborhoods. Journal of Urban Affairs, 39(8) 1138-1154.
  • Gonzales, T. (2017). Play and Public Space. WAMC, The Academic Minute
  • Gonzales, T., Barnes, M. (2017). From At-Risk to At-Promise: Social Capital and Adult-Youth Relationships. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2016). Community engagement: Theory, practice, and the politics of help. American Sociological Association
  • Gonzales, T. (2016). Immigrants and Voting. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2016). . W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2016). Play and Public Space. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2015). The Impact of Place: Field trips, parks, and farms. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2015). Racial (In)Equality in the U.S. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2015). Empowerment Zones, Heritage Tourism, and Gentrification in Harlem. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog
  • Gonzales, T. (2014). So Fresh Saturdays: Public Events and Building Collective Action. W.W. Norton Everyday Sociology Blog

Selected Presentations

  • Ratchet, Rasquache: Black women and Chicana activists and community development in Chicago - National Women's Studies Association Annual Conference, November 2018 - Atlanta, GA
  • Trust as a mask for domination: Organizational (mis)trust, community development, and the New Communities Program - Sociology of Development Conference, Disparities in Development, October 2017 - Detroit, MI
  • Promoting fun: The importance of “play” in cultivating Black and Latin@ counterpublics within Chicago - Community Development Society Annual Conference, July 2016 - Minneapolis/St.Paul, MN
  • Promoting fun: The importance of “play” in cultivating Black and Latin@ counterpublics within Chicago - Association of American Geographers Annual Conference, April 2016 - San Francisco, CA
  • Conspire for power: Relationships of trust, community economic development, and the New Communities’ Program in two Chicago neighborhoods - American Sociological Association Annual Conference, August 2015 - Chicago, IL
  • Conspire for power: Relationships of trust, community economic development, and the New Communities’ Program in two Chicago neighborhoods - Community Development Society Annual Conference, July 2015 - Lexington, KY
  • Relationships of trust?: The community pitfalls of a growing LISC network and the benefits of interorganizational mistrust - Society for the Study of Social Problems Annual Meeting, August 2014 - San Francisco, CA
  • Active transport: Grassroots organizations, and the growth of civic literacy as a response to urban transportation development projects - Latin American Studies Association Annual Conference, May 2014 - Chicago, IL
  • “We develop our people”: Innovative community approaches to local economic development in two low-income Chicago neighborhoods - American Anthropology Association Annual Conference, November 2013 - Chicago, IL
  • An alternative lens: Rethinking (re)development strategies within two low-income Chicago neighborhoods - Community Development Society Annual Conference, July 2013 - Charleston, SC
  • Urban safari: Tourism as local economic development - Minority GSA “Eyes on the Mosaic”, April 2012 - Chicago, IL
  • Retail districts and gentrification: Small business owners’ responses to urban renewal - American Sociological Association Annual Conference, August 2010 - Atlanta, Georgia
  • “Space for Lease”: Small businesses and gentrification in a Chicago neighborhood - SSRC-Mellon Mays Summer Conference, June 2009 - Oberlin, OH
  • “Space for Lease”: Small businesses and gentrification in a Chicago neighborhood - Inter-Ivy Sociology Symposium, March 2009 - New York, NY

Selected Contracts, Fellowships, Grants and Sponsored Research

  • Career Enhancement Fellowship (2017), Fellowship - Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Grant (declined) (2017), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Research & Creative Work Grant (2017), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Research Associate (2017), - Five College Women’s Studies Research Center
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Grant (2016), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Research & Creative Work Grant (2016), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Grant (2015), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College Mellon Faculty Career Enhancement Grant (2014), - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Creating Connections Consortium Post-Doctoral Fellowship (Declined) (2014), Fellowship - Sociology Department, Middlebury College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Knox College McCormick Grant (2014), Grant - Knox College
    Gonzales, T.
  • Woodrow Wilson Mellon Mays Dissertation Grant – Alternate (2012), Grant -
    Gonzales, T.
  • Woodrow Wilson Mellon Mays Travel and Research Grant (2012), Grant -
    Gonzales, T.
  • U.C. Berkeley Dean’s Normative Time Fellowship (2011), Fellowship - U.C. Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • Departmental Research Grant (2011), Grant - U.C. Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • U.C. Berkeley Center for Latino Policy Research Mini-Grant (2010), Grant - U.C. Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • Graduate Studies Enhancement Grant (2008), Grant - SSRC – Mellon Mays Graduate Initiative
    Gonzales, T.
  • Departmental Research Award (2011), Grant - U.C. Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • Chancellor's Fellowship (2007), Fellowship - University of California, Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • Departmental Research Grant (2008), Grant - U.C. Berkeley
    Gonzales, T.
  • Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (2005), Fellowship - Smith College
    Gonzales, T.

Research Currently in Progress

  • Ratchet-Rasquache: Black women and Chicana activists and community leadership development in Chicago

    Drawing on 30-months of ethnographic fieldwork in two Chicago neighborhoods, this paper discusses how Chicana and Black women activists strategically deploy discursive and aesthetic frames as tools for local redevelopment. Combining cultural signifiers, such as “ratchet” and “rasquache”, I highlight how women of color activists in Chicago disrupt negative narratives of both their neighborhoods and women-led movements.
    Gonzales, T.I. (Principal)

  • Semillas de Justicia: Chicana Activists and Environmental Justice in Chicago

    Chicana activists in Chicago are at the forefront of challenging environmental racism, rethinking conventional urban design practices, and advocating for environmental cleanup of contaminated land within Latina@/x communities. Drawing on a 30-month ethnographic case study of grassroots organizing in La Villita, a predominantly working-class Mexican-immigrant neighborhood of Chicago, and fourteen interviews with local community organizers and residents, I highlight how Chicana activists draw on a history of women of color guerilla organizing to transform abandoned and blighted spaces. Using an asset-based framework, Chicana activists cultivate local knowledges, skills, and strengths as seeds for justice. This includes the work done by the women-led Little Village Environmental Justice Organization around the closure and reimagining of the Fisk & Crawford Coal Plants, the cleanup of a superfund site and its later transformation into a public park, and the creation of a community-garden. These activists’ efforts have led to increased resident ownership over local land, and civic activity by both community-based organizations and residents. At the same time, I argue that their actions showcase the ability and flexibility of Chicana-led grassroots organizations in addressing larger structurally and environmentally racist development policies at the city, rather than at the neighborhood, level.
    Gonzales, T.I. (Principal)

  • Trust as a mask: Collective skepticism, leadership, and redevelopment in two Chicago neighborhoods

    Under contract with NYU Press, Trust as a Mask bridges an important gap in the literature to showcase how distinct types of community organizations negotiate disparate power relationships through locally based campaigns. With a focus on two neighborhoods in Chicago, I pay particular attention to the differences and similarities between Black and Latin@/x-led neighborhood organizations that strategically use mistrust, or what I term collective skepticism, in order to influence redevelopment initiatives within their communities.
    Gonzales, T.I. (Principal)