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Music Program I

“Falcata” composed by Nathan Sharples, UML music student

Performed by the UMass Lowell Percussion Ensemble; Jeffrey Fischer, Director

“Loch Lomond” composed by Frank Ticheli

Performed by the UMass Lowell Concert Band and the New England Youth Wind Ensemble; Debra-Nicole Huber, Conductor

When “Loch Lomond” was written, the Scots wanted a Scottish king, not an English one. War ensued. The Scots lost, and the Battle of 1746 gave rise to a song telling of two captured soldiers. One, set free, takes the long (high) road over mountains and hills; the other is to be executed. The latter’s spirit, according to Celtic legend, will take the faster (low) road for the dead. The second soldier says, “You will return alive, and I in spirit.” Composer Frank Ticheli wove the folk song “Irish Tune from County Derry” into the work. He says, “I hope their intermingling suggests a spirit of human harmony.”   

“Jazz Crimes” composed by Joshua Redman

Performed by The Jazz Criminals; coached by Barry Long, Jeffrey Fischer, Mark Latham with Elissa Johnson-Green and Tim Crain
Ten-time Grammy-nominated jazz saxophonist Joshua Redman (b. 1969) composed “Jazz Crimes” for his 2002 album, “Elastic.” Redman has performed with such luminaries as Herbie Hancock, B.B. King and Yo-Yo Ma. Artists like Redman “committed crimes” by introducing samples, electronic effects and rock music to their repertoire, and so “Jazz Crimes” was named.

“Dream of the Cherry Blossoms” composed by Keiko Abe

Performed by Ross Bello, Marimba; coached by Barry Long, Jeffrey Fischer, Mark Latham with Elissa Johnson-Green and Tim Crain
“Dream of the Cherry Blossoms” by Keiko Abe is based on an improvisation on the themes of the Japanese folksong “Sakura, Sakura.” The word Sakura means cherry blossom.

“Concerto à 4 Viole No. 1” (Movements 1 and 2) composed by Georg Philipp Telemann

Performed by the UML String Quartet; coached by Barry Long, Jeffrey Fischer, Mark Latham with Elissa Johnson-Green and Tim Crain
Telemann’s “Concerto à 4 Viole” is widely performed by string ensembles throughout the world. This celebrated, prolific German composer of the late 1600s was a skillful self-trained musician who brought aristocratic music to the public. He influenced Bach and Handel. Among his works were hundreds of compositions for church ensembles and choirs.

“Love Song” Lyrics by Maggie Dietz and Music by Christopher Lee

Performed by the UMass Lowell Chamber Singers & University Choir; Jonathan Richter, Conductor

“Love Song” represents an exciting collaboration between the UMass Lowell departments of English and Music. With music by Christopher Lee and text by Maggie Dietz, the work was written from the perspective of a parent speaking to a child. The work is filled with dreams, aspirations and reassurances for a youth with a bright future. 

“Love Song”

The ancients would lift
   a clay spout to your lips—
   water and honey and wine.

I give you milk, softened
   with wine, and swear  

you'll never hunger, never
    thirst while I'm alive.

What suffering I can't preclude
   I'll soothe with singing:

My future, for you

not the greenness of a leaf
   but of the leaves on all
   the April branches.

Fire, I give you fuel. I sweat
   and chop the wood.

I tender forever in you
   who begin where I end as if 

your body is
   my body, your elegance
   my elegance.

Sustenance, emptiness
   is lack of you, yearning is 

the road to where you are.

You are the road, the where,
   the song, the hunger. Child, 

I give you sleep, I sing
   you there. 

Maggie Dietz, "Love Song" from “That Kind of Happy.”  Copyright © 2016 by The University of Chicago.  

“Will the Circle Be Unbroken” Traditional Appalachian Folk Song, arranged by J. David Moore

Performed by the UMass Lowell Chamber Singers & University Choir; Jonathan Richter, Conductor

This uplifting Appalachian folk song, “Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” speaks to a beautiful promise to be fulfilled through faith, hard work and togetherness.

Sponsored by the College of Fine Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences