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SLICE Project Examples

Service-Learning Project Examples

Many service-learning projects were done in conjunction with the Village Empowerment Peru Project. They are listed separately.

Parking Lot Redesign

Course: 25.108 - Introduction to Engineering II (Civil Engineering)
Instructor: Jackie Zhang
Partner: Lowell Community Health Center (LCHC)

Students worked with the Lowell Division of Planning and Development to maximize the number of spaces in the Davidson Street municipal parking lot.

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UMass Lowell Parking Lot Re-Design

Course: 25.108 - Introduction to Engineering II (Civil Engineering)
Instructor: Jackie Zhang
Partner: University of Massachusetts Lowell (Facilities)

The students applied the knowledge acquired in the class to propose different ideas for re-designing the parking lot behind the Lydon Library located on north campus of UMass Lowell. The existing parking lacks pedestrian access, has no space for snow plowing, and there are many dead-ends.

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Analyze Playgrounds for the City of Lawrence

Course: 22.213 - Dynamics
Semester: Spring 2007
Instructors: Faize Jamil and John Duffy
Partner: City of Lawrence - Department of Parks and Recreations, Additional Local Lowell playgrounds

The project was similar to that described for the Spring of 2006. Four teams composed of four students in each team assessed playground safety in the City of Lawrence. One team visited the Seargent Lucien Bourgoin Playground located in the City of Lawrence to assess the safety of the playground equipment, along with possible improvement options.

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Playground Ride Safety Analysis

Course: 22.213 - Kinematics - Handout
Semester: Spring 2006
Instructors: Faize Jamil and John Duffy
Partner: Local Playgrounds

Working groups of two to three students selected one of two sets of suggested miniproject playground sites; or proposed one of their own. Students surveyed, analyzed and evaluated inherent safety hazards of playground designs, spacing, surfacing materials and equipment, turned in a joint group report. Students finalized their playground assessment and suggested improvements in a report that was shared with community partners (listed above). By the end of the course and s-l project, students reported increased awareness of engineering roles that contribute to increased safety capacity as a part of engineering design and assessment

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Development of methods to test local playground surface hardness for safety and suggest optional improvements to enhance playground safety

Course: 22.403 - Mechanical Engineering Lab II
Semester: Fall 2005, Fall 2006
Instructor: Peter Avitabile (Fall 2005), Majid Charmchi (Fall 2006)
Partner: Local Playgrounds

Students in this course developed methods to test local playground surface hardness for safety and suggest optional improvements to enhance playground safety. This course was a continuation of Mechanical Engineering Lab I. Course content focused on digital data acquisition systems used on mechanical engineering equipment. Students designed measurement systems composed of various transducers, their associated signal conditioners and digital data acquisition and recording devices.

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Analyze Playgrounds for the City of Lawrence

Course: 22.213 - Kinematics, Miniproject for Dynamics
Instructor: Faize Jamil and John Duffy
Partner: City of Lawrence -Department of Parks and Recreations, along with additional Local Lowell playgrounds

The students assessed the safety of the playground equipment, the playground surface and also addressed possible improvement options to different playgrounds in the city of Lawrence. Equipment included for dynamics analyses consisted of a slide, a swing set, a merry go round, and a play fire pole.

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Design of Experiments for Plastic Windshield Scraper Molding

Course: 22.473 - Design Theory and Constraints
Semester: Fall 2005
Instructor: Sammy Shina
Partner: Plastics Department Outreach Program

The Plastic Engineering Department was interested in the application of statistical methods for improving quality and reducing cost for plastic injection molded parts. Ice-scrapers are manufactured in the plastics engineering molding lab during demonstrations for visitors and distributed as giveaways to promote the application of STEM education. A collaborative effort was made between the mechanical and plastics faculty with the goal of manufacturing plastic parts of higher quality and lower cost using statistical techniques.

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Feasibility Study for Photovoltaic Energy System for Greater Lowell Technical High School GLTHS

Course: 22.504 - Energy Systems Design
Instructor: John Duffy
Partner: Greater Lowell Technical High School (GLTHS)

The Energy Systems Design Course performed a feasibility study for the GLTHS to first prove that it would be a practical investment for the school both economically and educationally. The study included: a site analysis, an energy analysis, a hardware analysis, a cost analysis and some additional recommendations.

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Design of a photovoltaic system for a rooftop on campus

Course: 22.527 - Solar System Engineering
Semester: Spring 2009
Instructor: John Duffy
Partner: UMass Lowell

In keeping up with their “Green Initiatives”, UMass Lowell is planning on using solar energy to help power the new and excitant facilities. Students designed the optimal position of solar photovoltaic systems for the several flat rooftop buildings and for proposed sites were new buildings will be built.

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PV System for a house on Tohono O’odham Reservation

Course: 22.527 - Solar System Engineering
Semester: Spring 2009
Instructor: John Duffy
Partner: Tohono O’odham reservation

A detailed photovoltaic system design is needed for construction by the Tohono O’odham tribal college for houses on the reservation in AZ that have no electricity available or cannot afford electricity.

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Design of a PV water pumping system for the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation in AZ

Course: 22.527 - Solar System Engineering
Semester: Spring 2008
Instructor: John Duffy
Partner: Tohono O’odham reservation

At the Tohono O’odham Indian reservation in Arizona there are many families that live in such remote regions that no running water is available for daily use by the people, and therefore only outhouses exist for bathroom needs. Currently, the students at the Community College (TOCC) are building bathroom modules that will be used by these families, but currently, no local source of water is available for these bathrooms. Therefore the students from the Solar Systems Engineering course started their project by determining a water pump that could pump water from 300ft below the surface of the earth up to water tanks located on top of a bathroom module. The students then, using the irradiation data from nearby towns, determined how many solar panels would be needed to power the pump. These students also tested the panels available at the Solar lab as a basis of their sizing analysis, giving them a practical exercise to their knowledge.

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Design of a photovoltaic system as an educational display on campus

Course: 22.527 - Solar System Engineering
Semester: Spring 2008
Instructor: John Duffy
Partner: University of Massachusetts Lowell

A group of the students from the Solar Systems Engineering course decided on a project that will provide the University of Massachusetts Lowell with a small PV system that would serve as an energy source for lights, but mainly as an educational display of new and available technology. Their task was to site the system: decide which location was suited for the system (choosing a bus stop kiosk), taking as criteria if the system would have high visibility, if it would have any shading issues, and how much irradiation would be expected at the site. The students also put their knowledge to practice by testing different PV modules available from the Solar lab for their possible use at implementation; they also selected balance of system components like charge controllers, photoswitches and timers (which would turn the lights on during the night and turn them off at dawn), and they also determined an optimal tilt angle at which the panels would receive the most radiation

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UMass Lowell Smith & Eames Parking Lot Re-Design

Course: 25.108 Introduction to Engineering II (Civil Engineering)
Semester: Spring 2007
Instructor: Jackie Zhang
Partner: University of Massachusetts Lowell

The students applied the knowledge acquired in the class to propose different ideas for re-designing the parking lot behind the Lydon Library located on north campus of UML. The existing parking lacks pedestrian access, has no space for snow plowing, and there are many dead-ends.

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UMass Lowell Pinanski Parking Lot Re-Design

Course: 25.108 Introduction to Engineering II (Civil Engineering)
Semester: Spring 2008
Instructor: Jackie Zhang
Partner: University of Massachusetts Lowell

AutoCAD drawings, brief reports and presentations for a parking lot re-design to maximize spaces and snow removal for UML Pinanski parking lot. .

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UMass Lowell Southwick Parking Lot Re-Design

Course: 25.108 Introduction to Engineering II (Civil Engineering)
Semester: Spring 2009
Instructor: Jackie Zhang
Partner:University of Massachusetts Lowell

The students applied the knowledge acquired in the class to propose different ideas for re-designing the parking lot enclosed by four buildings and entered under the Southwick archway, located on north campus of UML. The existing parking is is highly congested, poor for pedestrians, and has no space for snow plowing. .

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Research Chemical Structure, Morphology, History, Properties, and Applications of a Synthetic Polymer used for Fibers

Course: 26.215 – Plastics Process Lab I
Semester: Fall 2007
Instructor: Carol Barry
Partner: American Textile History Museum

The students teams were asked to 1) research the chemical structure, morphology, history, properties, and applications of a synthetic polymer used for fibers, 2) create a PowerPoint presentation covering the results of their research, and 3) develop concepts for hands-on activities using the synthetic fiber.

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National Plastics Center Activities

Course: 26.215 - Plastics Process Lab I
Instructor: Carol Barry
Partner: National Plastics Center

The National Plastics Center asked the sophomores in the Plastics Process Lab I to develop hands-on activities for explaining the concepts of petroleum-to-plastics pellets and also, alternate sources of plastics.

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Impact of Additives in Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Products

Course: 26.215 – Plastics Process Lab I
Instructor: Carol Barry
Partner: National Plastics Center

Actual samples of PVC pipe from the Village Empowerment Peru Project were collected and brought to the U.S. for study and toxicity testing.

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Examine Test Methods for Plastics Materials and Evaluate the Test Results

Course: 26.215 – Plastics Process Lab I
Semester: Fall 2005
Instructor: Carol Barry
Partner: National Plastics Center

The Plastics Process Engineering Laboratories are designed to familiarize the students with the basic plastics manufacturing and testing techniques. In the first sophomore-level laboratory (26.215), the students examine test methods for plastics materials and evaluate the test results. The laboratories incorporate three elements: 1) group experiments, 2) analysis and reporting of experimental results, and 3) Plastics Safety Lecture. In a two-week-long service-learning component, the sophomores also apply their current knowledge of plastics materials to a practical problem. The “final exam” is a presentation of the service-learning projects.

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