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Biomedical Sciences Freshman Seminar

Description

This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the professions available within the field of biomedical sciences. Topics include history of the profession, stat and federal laboratory regulations, professional organizations, ethics and professionalism, and an overview of each laboratory discipline. The role of the biomedical scientist in the clinical setting will be explored further through laboratory and industry tours.

Introduction to Laboratory Research

Description

This course prepares students in the Biomedical Sciences major for biomedical research. Students will learn basic and clinical research design and experimental aspects, applying critical thinking skills and engaging in outcome evaluation of research studies and quantitative data analysis and interpretation. Students will develop an understanding of the key differences between basic, clinical, and translational research and their implications and relation to diagnostic, treatment, and health management. The course will introduce students to literature review, identifying basic and key gaps and formulating key questions for scientific experimental pursuit. The course also reviews basic statistics research methods and the importance of significant statistical sampling.

Prerequisites

Junior Level, or Permission of Instructor.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I

Description

The course is designed to provide a foundation in Molecular Biology with major emphasis of how different molecules of nucleic acids and proteins interact to support cell growth as well as the application of Molecular Biology in health care. This course will cover the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication, repair, transcription, translation, and gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It also covers the various roles of technology in elucidating the central concepts of molecular biology, from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Examples will be included to demonstrate the applications of Molecular Biology to Clinical Diagnostics and Biomedical Research.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI.3500 Human Biochemistry, and Co-req: BMSC.3240 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory I.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory I

Description

This laboratory course introduces basic molecular techniques and methodologies with hands-on experience. Starting with practices on information access from the NCBI databases, the students will learn techniques for proteins and nucleic acids extraction, quantification and separation, primer designs and PCR applications, gene cloning and expression, and principles of column chromatography for protein purification.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HCSI.3500 Human Biochemistry, and Co-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I.

Organic Structures and Reactions II

Description

This course presents fundamental principles of Organic Chemistry and chemical reactions not covered in Organic Structures and Reactions I, with continued emphasis on concepts most relevant to the health professions. More detailed structure-stability-reactivity relationships, stereochemical principles, and reaction mechanisms are presented, including many relevant examples of the applications of Organic Chemistry in drug design and synthesis, as well as its central role on metabolism and pharmacology. The course reviews and reinforces the sue of spectral techniques for the qualitative analysis of organic compounds and elucidation of chemical structures, with emphasis on infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.2420 Organic Structures and Reactions I, and BMSC.2440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory I, and Co-req: BMSC.3440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory II.

Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory II

Description

This course is designed to expose and train students interested in pursuing careers in health-related professions to more advanced laboratory techniques used in Organic Chemistry, building on the principles learned in organic structures and Reactions Laboratory I, including extraction, recrystallization, and chromatography. The synthesis, purification, and characterization of various classes of organic compounds will be carried out, including a multi-step synthesis. Laboratory experiments will be performed to exemplify and expand upon the principles covered in the Organic Structures and Reactions II lecture course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.2420 Organic Structures and Reactions I, and BMSC.2440 Organic Structures and Reactions Laboratory I, and Co-req: BMSC.3420 Organic Structures and Reactions II.

Biomedical Sciences Junior Seminar

Description

This course introduces students to contemporary biomedical research projects within the field of biomedical sciences. Students will attend research seminars organized by the Biomedical Sciences faculty and evaluate each presentation. Students will also develop interviewing skills and techniques for future employment and graduate school opportunities.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Junior Level, Clinical Lab Science Major.

OMICS: Essentials and Applications

Description

This course is designed to introduce the current OMICS technologies and their practical applications in human health and living environments. It provides the essential knowledge to explore OMICS technologies on person medicine. OMICS are emerging technologies for understanding the diversity and distribution of living organisms and the behavior of cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism at the molecular level using methods such as genomics, proteomics, systems biology, bioinformatics, as well as the computational tools needed to analyze and make sense of the data. Each of these OMICS topics will be covered by lectures for general overview and discussions on practical applications.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I, and BMSC.3240 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Lab I.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology II

Description

The course is designed to provide a foundation in Cell Biology with major emphasis on essential structural components and organelles and their biological functions, as well as molecular signaling mechanisms underlying major cellular processes and intercellular communications. The course also focuses of integration of biological processes on the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ and organism levels. This course will cover various roles of technology in elucidating the central concepts of molecular biology, from both a historical and contemporary perspective. Examples will be included to demonstrate the applications of Cell Biology in Clinical Diagnostics and Biomedical Research.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I, and BMSC.3240 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Lab I, and Co-req: BMSC.4140 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Lab II.

Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory II

Description

This laboratory course introduces basic cell biology techniques and methodologies with hands-on experience. The course will focus on practices of tissue culture, fluorescent labeling, membrane surface and intracellular protein visualization, microscopy, flow cytometry, posttranslational protein modification assays, ion channel functional assessment, cell signaling research methods, signaling pathway analysis and modeling disease conditions in cell lines.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.3220 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology I, and BMSC.3240 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology Lab I, and Co-req: BMSC.4120 Clinical Molecular and Cell Biology II.

Advanced Biomedical Laboratory Techniques

Description

This advanced laboratory course is designed for students to reinforce and apply many of the concepts and hand-on laboratory techniques learned in all of the previous courses taken by Biomedical Sciences majors. Students will engage in a semester-long laboratory project or projects involving extensive hands-on experience, whose primary objective is to empower students with the necessary knowledge and experience to make them employable in their field of choice within the Biomedical Sciences upon graduation for the University.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BMSC.4120 Clinical Mol. & Cell Biol. II, and BMSC.4140 Clinical Mol. & Cell Biol. Lab II, and Senior in Clinical Lab Sciences or Permission of instructor.

Clinical Laboratory Theory (Formerly 36.241)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the theoretical principles and applications of diagnostic techniques and the procedures of the clinical laboratory including phlebotomy. It will define and describe both qualitative and quantitative, manual and automated laboratory techniques, particularly in hematology.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) Only.

Clinical Laboratory Theory Lab (Formerly 36.243)

Description

A laboratory course designed to expose prospective clinical scientists to many of the essentialskills, methods, and procedures basic to professional performance in the clinical laboratory; to explain and demonstrate to students and have them perform these methods; to develop an understanding of these techniques and to provide a technical background, an approach to testing that the student can build upon and use in future courses.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MLSC.2410 Clinical Lab Theory & Physics; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) only.

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science (Formerly 36.273)

Description

This course is intended to provide the student with an overview of the medical laboratory. Topics include the history of the field, hospital and laboratory professional organizations, state and federal regulations, and careers in the clinical setting, in research and in industry. The role of the medical laboratory scientist in the clinical setting will be explored further through examination of each laboratory department. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Medical Bacteriology I (Formerly 36.311/512)

Description

A study of the cultural, biochemical, genetic, serological and pathogenic characteristics of disease producing microorganisms. Emphasis will be placed on the pathophysiology of the infectious diseases and their relationship to isolation and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI 2110 Bas Cl Micro & Pathology, HSCI 2130 Bas Cl Micro & Path Lab.

Medical Bacteriology Laboratory I (Formerly 36.313)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the student to pathogenic microorganisms, media and techniques used in the identification of these organisms. Emphasis will be based upon the isolation, identification and differentiation of pathogenic microorganisms common to man. In addition, quality control and antimicrobial susceptibility testing will be covered.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: HSCI 2110, HSCI 2130; and Co-req: MLSC 3110 Medical Bacteriology, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Hematology (Formerly 36.321)

Description

A study of the human hematopoietic system and its relationship to other organ systems. Discussions will include morphological and biochemical relationships of erythropoiesis and leukopoiesis in health and disease states. A study of the mechanics of blood coagulation as it relates to health and disease states will also be included.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 2410 Clinical Lab Theory, and MLSC 2430 Clinical Lab Theory Lab, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Hematology Laboratory (Formerly 36.323)

Description

This course is designed to emphasize current hematological and coagulation procedures used in today's clinical laboratory. The implications of these tests to diagnose, monitor and evaluate the various hematological disorders are also discussed.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 36.321 Clinical Hematology; CLS Medical Laboratory Science sub-plan student only.

Clinical Immunology (Formerly 36.331)

Description

An introduction to the principles of immunology including: the study of antigens and antibodies and their interactions and controls; description of cellular events and the immune response, and in vivo and in vitro antigen-antibody interactions with clinical relevance. Immunological aspects of transplantation, autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies and cancer pathogenesis are also discussed. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 36.360 Human Biochemistry.

Clinical Chemistry I (Formerly 36.351)

Description

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and theory of techniques used in the Clinical Chemistry laboratory for measurement of aminoacids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids in body fluids. Students will learn to use, interpret and evaluate the performance of these laboratory methods and develop the ability to recognize levels of these biochemical components in both normal and pathophysiological states. Examination and comparison of laboratory results will be used to diagnose or rule out disease. Techniques reviewed range from general to specific assays and from the classical to state-of-the-art methodologies. In addition, students will be able to assess the quality of laboratory generated values determine when values are invalid and suggest ideas to troubleshoot clinical laboratory methods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 3410, HSCI 3500, MLSC 3610; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS).

Clinical Chemistry Laboratory I (Formerly 36.353)

Description

This course is designed to introduce the clinical techniques of biochemical measurement in body fluids. These techniques range from general to specific assays and from the classical to the upto- date state of the art methodologies. Biochemical measurements of the following in the normal state and alterations due to pathophysiology are discussed: amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. Quality control of assay procedures is emphasized.

Prerequisites

Co-req: MLSC.3510 Clinical Chemistry I, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation (Formerly 36.361)

Description

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of clinical chemistry laboratory instrumentation. Emphasis is placed on theoretical concepts, instrument components and design, calibration and troubleshooting of modern instrumentation, and analytical methodologies in the clinical laboratory. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative applications of instrumental techniques are covered. Computer applications are included where appropriate. The following spectroscopic instruments are studied: ultraviolet, visible and infra red absorption, fluorescence, turbidimetry and nephelometry, reflectance, flame emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Electrochemical methods of analysis are reviewed, including potentiometric techniques, voltammetry and coulometry. Chromatographic instrumentation and methods are discussed, such as column and thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: HSCI 2520 Physiological Chem II; Co-Req: Clinical Lab Inst Lab; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS).

Clinical Laboratory Instrumentation Laboratory (Formerly 36.363)

Description

Laboratory exercises will be performed to supplement the material covered in 36.361.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MLSC.3610 Clin Lab Instrumentation; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritonal Sciences (BS).

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Seminar (Formerly 36.373)

Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with different interview skills and approaches to resume writing, the process of implementing a laboratory information system, good education practices and team building skills. Students will evaluate current research designs and work in a team to create a presentation to express their opinions as educated consumers.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Clinical Microbiology Practicum (Formerly 36.410)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory, designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology and clinical interpretation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 3110/512 Medical Bacteriology, and MLSC 3130 Medical Bacteriology Lab, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS), or Medical Laboratory Science option.

Medical Mycology & Parasitology (Formerly 36.411)

Description

Intensive study of classification, morphology, physiology, genetics and ecology of medically important fungi and parasites. Emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenicity and diagnosis.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MLSC 3110 & 313 Medical Bacteriology w/lab; Co-Req: MLSC 4130 Med Mycology & Para Lab.

Medical Mycology & Parasitology Laboratory (Formerly 36.413)

Description

The laboratory is designed to emphasize principles and procedures used in the isolation, cultivation, and identification of medically important fungi and parasites.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MLSC 4110 Med Mycology & Para or MLSC 6150 Medical Parasitology; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Virology/Serology Lab (Formerly 36.415)

Description

This course is designed to survey pathogenic viruses emphasizing diagnosis of disease. Evaluation of new technology and diagnostic tests with reference to diagnosis and prognosis of disease are examined. In addition, this course is designed to instruct students in the principles and techniques used in the clinical immunology/serology setting. Students will become proficient in laboratory techniques such as immunodiffusion, ELISA, hemagglutination, and neutralization techniques used for immunodiagnosis.. "

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MLSC.3310 Clinical Immunology; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Molecular Diagnostics Lab (Formerly 36.416)

Description

This course is designed to instruct students in the principles and techniques used in Molecular Diagnostics in the clinical laboratory setting. Students will be given both lecture and laboratory instruction in basic molecular testing methodologies. At the completion of this course, the student will have a basic understanding of molecular diagnostic principles and will be proficient in molecular diagnostic laboratory techniques including DNA extraction, PCR using SINEs and STRs, restriction enzyme digestion, ELISA, bacterial transformation, DNA sequencing and microarrays.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) Only.

Clinical Hematology Practicum (Formerly 36.420)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory. Designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of a clinical hematology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology, and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 3210 Clinical Hematology, and MLSC 3230 Clinical Hematology Lab, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Medical Lab Science option.

Clinical Immunohematology Practicum (Formerly 36.430)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated clinical laboratory is designed to reinforce knowledgeand skills gained in lecture and laboratory and, at the same time, introduce the student to thedaily activities of the clinical immunohematology laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control, methodology and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 4310/531 Clinical Immunohematology, and MLSC 4330 Clinical Immunohematology Lab, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Medical Lab Science option.

Clinical Immunohematology (Formerly 36.431)

Description

Lecture and case study discussions look at the major red cell antigen/antibody systems that are of importance in understanding transfusion therapies, blood antigen and antiody testing, compatibility testing, and pathological diseases. Emphasis is on differentiation and clinical significance of each system. Donor selection regulations, component preparation, adverse transfusion reactions, and hematherapy will also be discussed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: MLSC 3210 Clinical Hematology, and MLSC 3310 Clinical Immunology; CLS majors only.

Clinical Immunohematology Laboratory (Formerly 36.433)

Description

Practical laboratory experience in blood banking, illustrating the concepts stressed in the lecture including ABO and Rh typing,identification of other red cell antigens, antibody screening and identification, direct antiglobulin testing, crossmatching, and other techniques performed in the Clinical Immunohematology laboratory.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MLSC 4310 Cl Immunohematology or MLSC 5310 Clinical Immunohmatology; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Advanced Topics in Hemostasis (Formerly 36.434)

Description

This course will constitute an in depth study of the hemostatic mechanism. Current research and case studies on the roles of vessel endothelium, platelet function, clotting procoagulants and fibrinolysis will be presented. Students will diagnose pathologic hemostatic states, such as hemorrhage or thrombophilia, due to deficiencies and impairments of these roles, including the impact of natural and acquired anticoagulants/inhibitors and anticoagulant therapy.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 36.241 Clinical Lab Theory, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Chemistry Practicum (Formerly 36.450)

Description

Supervised clinical training in an affiliated hospital clinical laboratory. Designed to reinforce knowledge and skills gained in lecture and laboratory and at the same time introduce the student to the daily activities of the clinical laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on quality control,methodology and clinical interpretation and correlation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC 4520 Clinical Chemistry II and MLSC 4540 Clinical Chemistry II Lab, and Clinical Lab Sciences (BS), or Medical Lab Science option.

Urinalysis Practicum (Formerly 36.451)

Description

A one-week clinical rotation in an affiliated laboratory designed to give the student experience in microscopic examination and evaluation of urine sediments. Emphasis is on correlating physical and chemical characteristics with sediment evaluation and diagnoses as well as on quality control, methodology, and clinical interpretation and correlation. Additional routine tests of a physical and chemical nature will be performed and demonstrated.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: MLSC 4540 Clinical Chemistry Lab II, MLSC 4520 Clinical Chemistry II; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Clinical Chemistry II (Formerly 36.452)

Description

This course will provide students with knowledge and theory of techniques associated with determinants of acid-base balance, blood gases, electrolytes, osmolality, hemoglobin, toxicology, therapeutic drug monitoring and endocrinology. Students learn to interpret and evaluate the performance of these laboratory methods and develop the ability to recognize levels of these biochemical components in both normal and pathophysiological states. Laboratory techniques range from general to specific assays and from the classical to state-of-the-art methodologies. In addition, students will be able to assess the quality and validity of laboratory generated values, determine when values are invalid and suggest ideas to troubleshoot methodologies. Students will also be able to produce and analyze statistical data for use in correlation, comparison and evaluation of laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: 35.351

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 36.351 Clinical Chemistry I.

Laboratory Management and Ethics (Formerly 36.453)

Description

This course will acquaint the student with the many managerial, educational, technical, and administrative theories and practices, as well as moral and ethical issues that may confront the health care professional functioning within a clinical or research laboratory setting. In addition, it will present the varied career opportunities that are available for graduates.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) Only.

Clinical Chemistry Laboratory II (Formerly 36.454)

Description

This course, a continuation of 36.353, is designed to instruct the student in the analytical procedures and methods currently used in the clinical laboratory. Manual and automated methods utilized in the assessment of such topics as acid-base balance, porphyrins, toxicology and vitamins will be introduced. In addition, methods associated with the routine examinations of urine and other body fluids will be introduced. Quality control, laboratory safety and professional performance are emphasized.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: 36.452 Clinical Chemistry II; Clinical Lab Sciences (BS).

Senior Seminar (Formerly 36.474)

Description

This course is designed to familiarize the student with different types of questions used in the national certification exams and to give the student the opportunity to practice taking mock certification examinations.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Senior Research I (Formerly 36.483)

Description

Senior Research l is a research-based course in which students participate in an independent research project under the guidance of research-active faculty. Students identify a faculty mentor whose research area is of their interest and engage in a semester-long research experience. Students meet with their mentor(s) to design a clear and explicit research proposal and develop a timeline for performing the work. Student progress will be established by regular meeting with the research mentor, where assessment of completion of objectives shall be assessed and recorded. Appropriate and relevant reading assignments will complement bench work and other research assignments. Upon completion of the work, the student shall engage in creating a manuscript and/or presentation.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Senior Research II (Formerly 36.484)

Description

Senior Research II is a research-based course in which students participate in an independent research project under the guidance of research-active faculty. Student identify a faculty mentor whose research area is of their interest and engage in a semester-long research experience. Students meet with their mentor(s) to design a clear and explicit research proposal and develop a timeline for performing the work. Students progress will be established by regular meetings with the research mentor, where assessment of completion of objectives shall be assessed and recorded. Appropriate and relevant reading assignments will complement bench work and other research assignments. Upon completion of the work, the student shall engage in creating a manuscript and/or presentation.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MLSC.4830 Senior Research l.

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Directed Studies (Formerly 36.493)

Description

Students along with their faculty advisor will structure an acceptable project in one of four areas: research, program development, teaching, or clinical practicum. Students are eligible to earn three credits in accordance with departmental policy.

Prerequisites

Academic Plan Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) or Nutritional Sciences (BS) only.

Food Science with Lab

Description

This course explores the basic principles of food science such as: food preparation, food ingredients and food preservation, regulatory agencies and food regulations, and concepts that relate to food safety, recipe alteration and menu design. The laboratory component demonstrates and illustrates the chemical and physical properties of foods including the effects of processing, ingredients, and storage on food quality and nutrient retention.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Nutritional Sciences majors only. Permission number required.

Introduction to Nutritional Science(Formerly 35.205)

Description

This course introduces students to the major in Nutritional Science. Objectives of the major are covered along with beginning nutritional and food science principles, history of the profession, career options, and legal aspects of practice as a nutrition educator. An integrated survey of nutrition science as it relates to human physiological chemistry, food chemistry and biochemistry will also be discussed. This course will include guest speakers from within the department and outside the university. This course will be restricted to nutritional science majors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Nutritional Sciences majors only. Permission number required.

Human Nutrition(Formerly 35.206)

Description

This course provides an overview of nutrition and the components of a nutritious diet during the various stages of the life cycle. It emphasizes the impact of nutrition on the major contemporary health problems in the United States. Nutrition issues, trends and research, and their effect on society and the legislative process will be explored.

Nutrition and Health(Formerly 35.210)

Description

This course is an introductory course to the science of nutrition as it applies to everyday life and health. Focus will include the six major nutrients: carbohydrates, lipids (fats), protein, vitamins, minerals, and water and their importance in the human body. Digestion, absorption, and metabolism in the human body will be introduced. The course will also examine energy balance and weight management as they relate to nutrition and fitness. The impact of culture, demographics and ethnicity on nutritional intake will be discussed. Students will explore the relationship between nutrition and health through laboratory experiences.

Prerequisites

Anti-Req: Course is not for College of Health Science Majors.

Life Cycle Nutrition (Formerly 36.336)

Description

Biology of the life cycle including development, growth, maturation, and aging and its impact on nutritional requirements of humans from the zygote to the elderly is considered. How to meet these nutritional requirements is discussed relative to the feeding issues and context of each major life stage. Course emphasizes the critical analyses of beneficial and adverse outcomes of various nutrient intakes and dietary patterns of the nutritional status and well-being through integration of nutrition and other health sciences in understanding nutritional needs during the life cycle. Analysis of cultural, environmental, psychosocial, physical, and economic factors affecting nutritional status through the life span will also be discusses. Methods of nutritional assessment for each stage of the life cycle will be examined.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Community Nutrition (Formerly 36.345)

Description

This course explores the role of the nutrition professional in community needs assessment, intervention development and evaluation, and in forming domestic nutrition policy. Nutrition problems in contemporary communities and of selected target groups in the United States and in developing countries are examined. Programs and strategies to meet nutrition needs outside the acute care setting, such as nutrition education and food assistance are explored. Local, state,and national nutrition policy and initiatives in nutrition will also be examined. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2050 Intro to Nutritional Science and NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, and Nutritional Science (BS) only.

Introduction to Food Safety

Description

This course focuses on food safety from a 'farm to fork' perspective. The class will cover a comprehensive overview of the food safety system addressing the biological, chemical and physical agents with emphasis on domestic food-borne outbreaks, public health significance, disease control, and the microbial spoilage of foods. The history and fundamental principles of food safety will be addressed including the risk and hazard analysis of different foods and the important advances in food system that are necessary for controlling hazards in the modern food industry.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BS in Nutritional Science (Major or Minor), or (MPH in Dietetics or Nutrition).

Nutrition and Metabolism(Formerly 36.371)

Description

This class is advancement into the biochemical and physiologic process through which the nourishment of the human organism is accomplished and how the interactions among nutrients, other aspects of the environment, and the body result in perturbations affecting human health. The process of human nourishment proceeds within the context of an organism with an intricate structure, unique composition, and specific capacities for adaptive change. Basic information from many disciplines relating to body function and structure will be summarized. This will serve as setting the stage for detailed discussions, which describe the nutritional biochemistry and metabolism of the body for the normal state, and for states where nutrient availability is altered of disease is imposed. Prerequisites: 35.206

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Obesity & Weight Control(Formerly 36.372)

Description

Etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments of obesity, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia are reviewed. Role of hereditary, neurological, metabolic, and environmental mechanisms are discussed. Particular emphasis on obesity.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Biochemistry of Lipids(Formerly 36.406)

Description

This advanced course in the nutritional biochemistry and physiology of lipids will detail the role of lipids in the normal and pathological processes at both the cellular and whole organism level. Topics will range from general discussions of the digestion, absorption and transport of lipids to the role of eicosanoids and lipid soluble antioxidants during normal and diseased states, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and hypertension. Subject matter will also include a discussion of the various interventions for the prevention and treatment of certain of these disease states. There will also be discussion of the current issues in lipid nutrition.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, HSCI 3500 Human Biochemistry.

Vitamins and Minerals(Formerly 36.463)

Description

Detailed analysis of the digestion, absorption, transport, and intermediary metabolism of vitamins and minerals as essential nutrients. The chemical and biochemical characteristics of vitamins and minerals are examined to account for the physiological functions.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, HSCI 3500 Human Biochemistry.

Lab Methods in Nutrition Assessment (Formerly 36.465/565)

Description

This course provides the student the the opportunity to assess nutritional status using several modern analytical methods. The course uses spectrophotometry, HPLC and automated procedures to assess the status of vitamins, lipids, iron, glucose, and insulin. The student will learn the mathematical calculations needed for the methods. This course enables the student to appreciate how nutrient analysis is designed and implemented in the analytical laboratory.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 36.361 Clin Lab Instrumentation; Nutritional Science (BS) or Clinical Lab Sciences (BS) only.

Nutrition and Gene Expression(Formerly 36.472)

Description

Regulation of eukaryotic gene expression by specific nutrients, hormones, and metabolites will be discussed. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational mechanisms of specific nutrients with emphasis in disease development or prevention.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Medical Nutrition Therapy I(Formerly 36.481)

Description

This course is intended to provide students with current knowledge and application in dietary prevention, treatment, and long-term management of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and upper gastrointestinal diseases. Topics include nutrition counseling and communication skills, professional ethics, medical terminology, clinical laboratory values, dietary menu planning and analysis in specific situations, evaluating nutritional status, case studies for these diseases. This course will stress the steps in the nutrition care process, determine appropriate methods for screening patients for nutritional risk, and help the student assess the nutritional status of patients.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: NUTR.2060 Human Nutrition or HSCI.2060 Human Nutrition.

Medical Nutrition Therapy II(Formerly 36.482)

Description

This course is a continuation of Medical Nutrition Therapy I that will provide students with current knowledge and application in dietary prevention, treatment, and long-term management of patients with trauma, burns, HIV, cancer, liver, lower gastrointestinal diseases, celiac disease, and renal diseases. Topics include nutrition counseling and communication skills, professional ethics, medical terminology, clinical laboratory values, dietary menu planning and analysis in specific situations, evaluating nutritional status, case studies for these diseases, and will examine enteral and parental nutrition support for critically ill patients. Students will also develop a basic knowledge related tot the principles of fluid and electrolytes balance as well as acid-base balance as they relate to the nutritional care of patients/clients.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 36.481 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

Senior Research in Nutrition I

Description

Senior Research in Nutrition I will introduce concepts and application of research through critical exploration of the research process, research methodology, and ethics. Students will begin to critically review literature relevant to their field or interests and practice written scientific communication skills related to research.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Senior Status, Nutrition Science Majors only.

Directed Research in Nutrition(Formerly 36.494)

Description

Students with their faculty advisor structure a research project in the area of nutrition. A paper embodying the results of the project will be prepared.

Prerequisites

Academic Sub-Plan Nutrition only.

Senior Research in Nutrition(Formerly 36.496)

Description

Continuation of 36.494. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Information Literacy (IL), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).