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History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art (Formerly 58.203)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Medeival period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from Ancient Egypt and Near East, Antiquity, Byzantine and Medeival, and Early Renassance Europe. Methodological problems of interpretation, formal analysis and aesthetic principles are studies in these art works.

History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art (Formerly 58.204)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance times to the Modern period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from the Renaisance, Baroque, Rococo, Nineteenth Century Movements-Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism and Abstract Art. The aim of the course is to introduce the student to basic critical and art historical methods as well as the analysis of style and content within sequential cultural contexts.

Italian Renaissance Art (Formerly 58.321)

Description

A study of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Florence, Rome and .Venice during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Special emphasis on the formation of the High Renaissance style and the role of representative artists of the period, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael in Central Italy; Giorgione and Titian in Venice.

Northern Renaissance Art (Formerly 58.323)

Description

Development of Flemish and Dutch painting from the brothers Jan van Eyck and Roger van der Weyden to Bosch and Bruegel, from the late fourteenth century to mid-sixteenth century. The course will also include a study of French and German painters of the same period: Fouquet, Clouet, Durer, Grunewald and Holbein. Spring, alternate years.

The Golden Age of Spanish Art

Description

This course is a survey of art in Spain from the discovery of the Americas in 1492 through the mid-seventeenth. This roughly 150-year period, known as the Spanish Golden Age or Siglo de Oro, witnessed the expansion of the Spanish empire across the Atlantic and Asia and gave rise to many of Spain's greatest artistic achievements. This course will survey the unprecedented contributions of Spanish painters, sculptors and architects; the patrons and political forces contributing to this Golden Age of artistic production; and the place of the Spanish golden Age within broader European and global contexts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Medieval Art (Last Term 2005 Fall)(Formerly 58.241)

Description

This course examines the rich cross-cultural artistic heritage of the medieval world from the Late Antique period (third century CE) through the Gothic period (fourteenth century CE). The course includes the study of paintings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, mosaics and architecture. It will explore materials and technique, the relationship of images to sacred texts and rituals, and the controversies regarding image production. Drawing examples for the eastern Mediterranean to the rocky coast of Ireland, the course will draw out the way works of art reflected relationships between the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions.

Classical Mythology (Formerly 42.201)

Description

This course takes a literary approach to the mythology of Ancient Greece and Rome. We will explore stories of creation of the world, the fall of Troy, the travels of Odysseus and Theseus, the sins of Oedipus, and the rage of Medea. These texts examine some of the most disturbing and violent of human experiences, as well as some of the most moving: men and women's encounters with community, family, war, death, and love. We will address how these narratives form ethical and social codes that underpin western culture, and devote some attention to how these texts are reinterpreted by later authors. Authors may include Homer, Hesiod, Ovid, Virgil, and the Greek tragedians.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Bible as Literature (Formerly 42.250)

Description

Presents a literary and historical analysis of selected Old and New Testament books.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Discovering Shakespeare (Formerly 42.267)

Description

This class introduces students to some of the Bard's most popular and accessible plays. We will learn to understand Shakespeare's language and see how the plays were produced in Renaissance England, as well as examine his living legacy, in theater, film, and popular culture, throughout the modern world today . No previous experience with Shakespeare needed. Old Title: Introduction to Shakespeare.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

British Literary Traditions (Formerly 42.281)

Description

A survey of British Literary history from the medieval through the modernist periods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or English Majors.

World Literature in Translation I

Description

A survey of world literature (works outside British and American literary traditions) through 1660; all course readings are translated into English. Students will become familiar with conventions of different literary genres, including epic and lyric poetry, drama, fables and folktales, and religious and philosophical texts. The course also provides the major cultural, religious, and political contexts of the literary texts.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or English Majors.

History of the English Language (Formerly 42.307)

Description

Explores the origins and structure of the English language, tracing the ways that English has evolved from Old English through Middle English to the varieties of Modern English in England and its former colonies, including the United States. We will also examine the literary, social, and political implications of these developments, for instance the evolution of Standard English or the use of dialects. The course does not assume any knowledge of Old or Middle English.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Old English Language and Literature (Formerly 42.315)

Description

Students will acquire reading knowledge of the Old English language, spending half the semester mastering grammar and vocabulary, and the second half translating texts such as The Wanderer, Dream of the Rood, and Beowulf. Attention will also be given to Anglo-Saxon culture.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Middle English Language (1066-1500)

Description

England in the 11th century had a multi-lingual and diverse culture, with French, German, Scandinavian, and Latin speakers interacting daily. By 1500, England was English-speaking, with various dialects of Middle English emerging from this linguistic mix. In this class, students will learn to read and analyze the dialects of Middle English, translating text such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Harley Lyrics, the York Plays, and the Canterbury Tales from their original language. We will learn and apply the rules of grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary. Students will analyze critically questions of creolization, dialect and social class, and the emergence of print culture.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

From Beowulf to Tolkien (Formerly 42.336)

Description

We will read Beowulf in translation, and discuss contemporary approaches as well as engage with critical traditional questions. We will also read other Anglo-Saxon poetry and Old Norse-Icelandic sagas in translation in order to gain a cultural context for the Beowulf poem. Class will conclude with a look at how Tolkien's books were inspired and influenced by these works.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Medieval Women Writers (Formerly 42.338)

Description

Woman have always written and read and participated in culture. This class will explore writings on literary and non-literary genres by woman in the European Middle Ages (600-1500). Students will learn how different pre-modern cultural conditions affected the possibilities for women's authorship, readership, and patronage. We will also examine how women writers interacted with literary traditions and constructions of gender.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (Formerly 42.346)

Description

This class will explore the story of the ancient city of Troy from its origins in Homeric epic and classical drama to some of its many European iterations beginning with Vergil's Aeneid. Students will examine how these Trojan texts encode narratives of gender,ethnicity, and welfare, and how they help create an occidental European identity.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Arthurian Literature (Formerly 42.349)

Description

Will examine works in modern English translation from a variety of genres (romance, history, tragedy, epic) that tell stories of the mythical King Arthur and the knights and ladies of his courtly world. The course will focus primarily on texts of the medieval and renaissance periods, but will include attention to nineteenth- and twentieth-century versions in poetry, prose, art, music and film.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Middle Ages (Formerly 42.351)

Description

This course will examine a variety of medieval genres: epic, chanson de geste, romance, fable, lyric, and drama. We will analyze the circumstances under which the works were produced (orally and in manuscript) and imagine how they may have been read by men and women in their day. Texts are selected from the courtly pursuits of the aristocrats and from the popular, religious rituals and writings of the rising merchant class. We will also give some attention to medievalism, that is , how the middle ages have been perceived and transformed by contemporary cultures.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Renaissance Literature (Formerly 42.352)

Description

A study of English prose and poetry of the period.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Seventeenth Century (Formerly 42.353)

Description

A study of English prose and poetry of the period excluding Milton.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Medieval & Renaissance Theater (Formerly 42.360)

Description

A study of Medieval mystery cycles, morality plays, interludes, and other forms of popular and court theater.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

English Renaissance Drama (Formerly 42.363)

Description

A study of major dramatists of the Age of Shakespeare including Marlowe, Dekker, Webster, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Massinger, Ford and others

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Theatre History I: Ancient Greece through the 18th Century (Formerly 42.382)

Description

A survey of ancient to early modern theatre in its historical and social contexts, tracing changes and developments in acting styles, theatre architecture, scenic practices, dramatic literature, and the audience. The course examines how theatre both reflects and shapes the changing beliefs and priorities of a culture.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Shakespeare I (Formerly 42.423)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Shakespeare II (Formerly 42.424)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies not covered in 42.243. Shakespeare I is not a prerequisite.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Western Civilization I (Formerly 43.105)

Description

This course surveys some important issues and tendencies in the history of Western Civilization from its origins through the early modern period, including ancient Mesopotamia, classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. These include "civilization" and the rise of cities, different imaginings of god(s) and humanity, evolving forms of political organization, continuity and change in social organization and everyday life, and the ongoing dialogue of faith and reason. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

World Civilization I (Formerly 43.107)

Description

This class examines societies and cultures from ancient until early modern times with the underlying assumption that world history is an important conceptual tool for understanding our interdependent world. Course topics analyze the nature of the earliest human communities, the development of the first civilizations and the subsequent emergence of cultures in selected areas of Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas. This course also offers a consideration of issues related to the connections and relationships that shaped civilizations as a result of migration, war, commerce, and the various cultural expressions of self, society, and the cosmos before 1500. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Early Christianity (Formerly 43.200)

Description

This course serves as an introduction to the first 800 years of Christian history. It will begin with an introduction to the Apostolic Church of the first century (and its Jewish/Greco-Roman background) and conclude with an introduction to the Eastern Orthodox Church of Late Antiquity. The course will also cover popular topics like "Gnosticism," "Women in Early Christianity," and "Early Christian Worship and Art."

Religions in Medieval Europe

Description

This course serves as an introduction to religion in medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), that is, the Roman and Eastern traditions of Christianity, Christian movements deemed "heretical" by "orthodoxy," Judaism, and Islam. Understanding the medieval history of these religions results in our gaining not only a comprehension of their individual developments but also how the three great monotheistic faiths have become some of the most powerful religious forces ever seen in civilization. These different religions will be treated not only individually but also in dialogue with one another.

Ancient Greek History (Formerly 43.225)

Description

A study of Greek history, institutions and culture from Minoan times through the Hellenistic period.

Roman History and Civilization (Formerly 43.226)

Description

This course examines one thousand years of Roman history (ca. 500 BC-500AD) with equal emphasis upon social, political, military, and cultural aspects of the Republic and Empire.

Europe in the Middle Ages (Formerly 43.227)

Description

A survey of the Latin West during the formative period from the Roman Empire to the creation and development of the first European civilization.

Women in European History (Formerly 43.228)

Description

This course examines the history of women in late medieval, early modern, and modern Western Europe (ca. 1300-1900). From medieval saints and Renaissance queens to Enlightenment Salonieres and ordinary wives and mothers, women have played an astonishing variety of roles. We will utilize primary and secondary sources, historical films, and works of art to understand the contributions and challenges of women in the past.

Renaissance and Reformation (Formerly 43.231)

Description

The history of Europe in the time of transition between the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period. Two principle topics are the intensification of cultural change which began in Italy around 1300 and spread slowly northward and the disruption of the unity of the Western Christian Church.

Byzantine History & Civilization (Formerly 43.302)

Description

A study of the important political, social, and cultural changes in the East Roman Empire from the founding of Constantinople to the fall of the Empire in 1453 with emphasis on the role of Byzantium as the custodian of the classical past.

England: The Middle Ages (Formerly 43.327)

Description

The history of the English people and nation from the Roman conquest to the end of the fourteenth century with special emphasis on the development of political and social institutions.

Childhood in Premodern Europe (Formerly 43.329)

Description

This course examines the concept of childhood in medieval and Renaissance Europe (ca. 1100-1600), with particular attention to England and Italy. There are no specific prerequisites, although some knowledge of European history (i.e., Medieval Institutions, Western Civilization, Renaissance-Reformation) will be useful. Among the topics we will consider are the following: the different stages of childhood; children's education and apprenticeship; dress, diet, and demeanor of children; orphans; royal children; Protestant and Catholic views of children; adolescent sexuality; depiction of children in art; child labor; literature for children.

Warfare in the Ancient World (Formerly 43.332)

Description

Warfare in the Ancient World is a practical introduction to the study of warfare in the ancient world and traces the advances made in empire building, ideology and military technology. The chronological structure of the class starts with the Egyptians and continues through the Dark Age, Classical and Hellenistic Greeks, to the rise and fall of Rome. This course will trace certain themes through the centuries: how different civilizations waged war; who served in various armies and why soldiers decided to fight. While major battles and important individuals are discussed, military tactics and strategies are only tools to help understand the underlying causes for armed conflict.

Inquisition: Myth and Reality (Formerly 43.342)

Description

Following a brief introduction and an overview of the medieval Inquisition, the first few weeks of the course will be devoted to a study of the Inquisition in Spain and Italy from 1450-1650. We will also discuss the way in which the history of the Inquisition has been analyzed during the past five hundred years (what historians call "historiography"). The second half of the course will focus on student research and selected topics in Inquisition studies.

Medieval Institutions (Formerly 43.371)

Description

This is a reasonably intensive reading seminar focusing on a number of important medieval institutions that have helped to influence our modern world. You will read a number of works in order to discuss them in detail in class. In addition, you will be required to write a review of one of three required books.

History of College, 1100-1900 (Formerly 43.386)

Description

The foundation of universities in late medieval Europe also ushered in the earliest colleges, intended primarily to house students but also to provide tutoring, social support, and financial assistance. The earliest colleges arose in Paris but soon spread to Bologna, Oxford, and other university towns. This course traces the history of colleges from late medieval Europe to nineteenth-century America. It considers the various models of colleges that developed in northern and southern Europe, and how those models were transferred across the Atlantic. Some colleges remained primarily residences, while others expanded to ofer a full graduate and undergraduate curriculum. We will also consider topics like student life, financial arrangements, admissions, alumni, and academic requirements.

Ancient Mediterranean: Cultures in Contact (Formerly 43.388)

Description

The ancient Mediterranean was home to a diverse array of cultures in close contact with each other through trade, warfare, and colonization. This course will study a variety of Greco-Roman responses to other cultures through a series of case studies of contact between Greeks, Romans, and other cultures of the ancient world. In particular, we will examine questions of the applicability of modern concepts such as race and ethnicity, and explore the ways in which these shifting representations of other cultures are reflective of the ways in which Greeks and Romans perceived themselves. We will also reflect on the ways in which these ancient Greco-Roman conceptions of culture relate to our own modern understandings of cultural difference.

Law in the Ancient Greek World

Description

This course will examine the body of evidence for law in the ancient Greek world as a means of understanding the legal, political, and social history of the Greek poleis. In particular we will focus our attention on the large corpus of forensic speeches form Classical Athens with an eye to understanding the ways in which the Athenian city governed itself and resolved conflict within the poleis. Due to the nature of these speeches and the evidence for Greek legal practices, we will also be examining various aspects of Greek social and economic history within a legal context, including gender, slavery, property law, and citizenship.

Music of Western Civilization (Formerly 74.161)

Description

A survey of music from earliest times to the present. Significant forms, styles, composers, and aesthetic concepts are examined. Open to non-music majors only.

Music History 1 (Formerly 74.261)

Description

Studies sacred and secular musical forms from pre-Christianity to 1750.

Dante's Way from Fear to Peace

Description

The course will involve close reading of central cantos from all three books of Dante's Divine Comedy, the Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. Through we will consider Dante's place in the history of European literature, in particular, his relationship to Virgil and the epic tradition, our primary focus will be on three philosophical concerns, existential/ethical, metaphysical/ontological, and epistemological/Linguistic.

Early Modern Philosophy

Description

Examines Early Modern European Philosophy and its religious and scientific context, including movements such as the Mechanical Philosophy, Rationalism, Empiricism, and Transcendental Philosophy. Topics include knowledge and scientific understanding, the human mind and personal identity, and the debate between faith and reason.

Poetry and Philosophy After Plato (Formerly 45.339)

Description

After defining "Neoplatonism" with reference to Plato's Phaedo, Symposium, and Phaedrus, the course will consider the relationships among Homer's Odyssey, Plotinus's Enneads, Virgil's Aeneid, Augustine's Confessions, and Dante's Divine Comedy. The focus will be on coming home to the "source and origin" after having been away and, as the philosopher Plotinus puts it, having been "a stranger in something strange". Students will be invited to work on other literary and philosophical treatments of this theme in English, Irish or American poetry and writing. A principal concern of the course is language "sung, spoken, and written". Accordingly, the course will applicable to, and count for the Philosophy and Communications track.

Greek Tragedy & Philosophy (Formerly 45.347)

Description

Philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hegel, and Nietzsche have drawn inspiration from, and challenged critically, the great Greek tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. This course will play off philosophical commentaries against the specific tragedies they have targeted in order to examine the often tense relationship between philosophical discourse and tragic poetry.

Ancient Philosophy (Formerly 45.386)

Description

A survey of the beginnings of philosophy, mainly western, from the Presocratics to Augustine. Studies the emergence of philosophy out of mythical forms of thinking and the development of rational thought in the work of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and the Neoplatonists.

Plato and Beginning of Philosophy (Formerly 45.387)

Description

It is Plato who first uses the words 'philosopher" and "philosophy", and who, in his dialogs or dramatic discussions, establishes for all subsequent Western thought just was the enterprise of philosophy will be. In our study of these dialogs we will trace the origins in Plato of philosophy's primary questions concerning what is real and true as opposed to mere appearance (ontology, metaphysics), what is knowledge as opposed to mere opinion (epistemology), what is valid argument (logic), what is beautiful (aesthetics), and what is good, just and fair (ethics, politics). Plato foregrounds speech and language in all these considerations. Hence language, as the medium of thought and communication, will be a fundamental concern throughout our study.

Cervantes' Don Quijote in translation

Description

Cervantes' Don Quijote will examine new ideas and concepts concerning one of the world's greatest novels. Taught in English, there is no language requirement for this course; however, this course is designed to engage student interest in historically and culturally significant events in Golden Age Spain and to - more importantly - expand student interest in literary criticism of the Spanish Golden Age and of Cervantes' masterwork in particular. Because it is taught in English, this course does not count toward the Spanish major or minor.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.