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From Collective to Personal Aesthetics (Formerly 79.280)

Description

This course is an exploration in aesthetics and culture. The seminar examines a variety of works by contemporary artists and designers; and also introduces important texts by philosophers, art theorists, and critics. Throughout the semester, student will study current trends in visual studies. They will examine a range of works form popular culture to high art and respond to various readings through class discussions and papers. In addition, the course will facilitate intellectual engagement with ones own visual work. Through their research, student will explore the connections between their work and that of other artists and designers. They will situate their artwork within the field of criticism, creating a bridge across the traditional divide between theory and practice.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Junior or Senior Status or Permission of Instructor.

Post-digital Aesthetics

Description

Post-digital Aesthetics explores art after the digital revolution focusing on critical analysis of digital images and environments. We will study how digital technology has transformed art making and also how it impacts the very definition of art. The blurring of boundaries between art, life and design is more than ever evident as human experiences are increasingly mediated through technological devices and high-quality design. The internet has dramatically altered how and why we make art while virtual presence and embodiment in VR bring unprecedented questions about the role of artists and designers in our understanding of the world. This course will be taught as a face-to-face seminar. However, we will also travel beyond the classroom walls into virtual worlds and environments.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Junior or Senior Status or Permission of Instructor.

Art Appreciation (Formerly 58.101)

Description

The course introduces the student to the technical, aesthetic and historical aspects of architecture, sculpture, and painting. An analysis of the visual elements used in fine arts such as color, line, shape, texture, and principles of design are developed through slide lectures, museum visits and assigned readings. In addition, students investigate the purposes of art and visual communication and develop a heightened sense of critical thinking that allows them to investigate successfully different modes of representation, styles and media in a multicultural society.

History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art (Formerly 58.203)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Medeival period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from Ancient Egypt and Near East, Antiquity, Byzantine and Medeival, and Early Renassance Europe. Methodological problems of interpretation, formal analysis and aesthetic principles are studies in these art works.

History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art (Formerly 58.204)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance times to the Modern period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from the Renaisance, Baroque, Rococo, Nineteenth Century Movements-Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism and Abstract Art. The aim of the course is to introduce the student to basic critical and art historical methods as well as the analysis of style and content within sequential cultural contexts.

History of Architecture (Formerly 58.206)

Description

A survey of the major technical and stylistic developments in ecclesiastical and secular architecture from Prehistory to the present day studied with an emphasis on the major monuments (Parthenon, Pantheon, Gothic Cathedrals, St. Peter's, Versailles Palace, Eiffel Tower, Guggenheim Museum). Spring, alternate years.

Nineteenth Century Art (Formerly 58.211)

Description

A study of the nineteenth century European painting, sculpture, and architecture are analyzed, including the art of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Symbolism and Art Nouveau.

Greek and Roman Art (Formerly 58.231)

Description

A study of Greek painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Cycladic to the Hellenistic period, and an examination of Roman Art from the Etruscan age to the beginning of Christian art. Emphasis is placed on the Greek Classical period and the Roman Empire.

Studies In World Art (Formerly 58.302)

Description

Historical and critical examination of regions works of art from China, Asia, the Islamic world, India, Africa, North America, Latin America, Native American Art and Mexico. Topics vary from year to year. Course may be repeated.

American Art (Formerly 58.313)

Description

The study of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Colonial period to the end of the nineteenth century seen in relation to European developments and American social and technological changes. Emphasis is placed on New England architecture.

Islamic Art and Contemporary Society (Formerly as 59.315)

Description

This course introduces students to Islamic art through a survey of works across the broad reach of the Islamic world including Saudi Arabia, Northern and Saharan Africa, Spain, the former Ottoman Empire surrounding Turkey and the Greater Middle East. The last unit of the course looks at Islamic art in the diaspora. The course highlights works form c. 500 CE to the present, ending with the ultra modern city of Dubai. Contemporary artists who draw on Islamic artistic traditions will also be covered, such as Ahmed Mater, Robin Kahn, and the Cooperative of Western Saharan Woman/UNMS, Sharin Nashat, and Michael Rakowitz.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARHI.1010 Art Appreciation, or ARHI.2030 History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art , or permission of instructor.

Baroque Art in Italy (Formerly 58.332)

Description

The development of painting, sculpture and architecture in Italy during the seventeenth century with special emphasis on Rome and Venice. The role of representative artists (Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, Pietro da Cortona, Artemisia Gentileschi, Elisabetta Sirani and Longhena) is emphasized.

Art History Seminar (Formerly 58.490)

Description

Study of particular artist, style or selected art historical problem. Topics to be announced. Course may be repeated.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 58.204 History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art or Permission of Instructor.

Western Civilization I (Formerly 43.105)

Description

This course surveys some important issues and tendencies in the history of Western Civilization from its origins through the early modern period, including ancient Mesopotamia, classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. These include "civilization" and the rise of cities, different imaginings of god(s) and humanity, evolving forms of political organization, continuity and change in social organization and everyday life, and the ongoing dialogue of faith and reason. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

The Modern World (Formerly 43.106)

Description

In a period of intensifying globalization a basic understanding of our world is increasingly important. The main purpose of this course is to expose students to the global processes that have shaped our modern world since roughly the year 1500. Taking on a global and comparative perspective, this course will help students to develop a topical, chronological, and geographical understanding of global history and cultures.

China & the Modern World (Formerly 43.204)

Description

This course introduces China's interactions with the world since the 1840s. With theOpium War as the starting point, students are ushered into a traditional China whosepolitical system, cultural values, and an economic structure stood in sharp contrast to those of the outside world. The main focus of the course is to explore the process inwhich China fought for its survival as a sovereign nation and searched for its road tomodernization.

Colonial Latin America (Formerly 43.209)

Description

This class examines the history of Latin America from 1492 until the early nineteenth century. After considering the rise of the Aztec and Inca empires, we will consider how the Spanish and Portuguese were able to acquire and maintain control in the region. Topics include indigenous-European relations, slavery, economic developments, the challenges of maintaining a colonial government, and Latin American independence.

Native American History (Formerly 43.274)

Description

A comprehensive study of the Native Americans through historical and first-hand accounts of their lives. Designed to enlighten students and to represent fairly the Native Americans, dispelling some of the existing myths about them.

African-American History (Formerly 43.275)

Description

This course surveys African American history in the United States from colonization to the present. It begins with a study of life in West Africa and traces the forced migration of Africans to the Americas. It explores West African transmissions, the freedom struggle, the great migrations from the South, the Harlem Renaissance, the modern Civil Rights movement, and the continuing impact of African Americans on life in the 21st century.

Sub--Saharan Africa (Formerly 43.281)

Description

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the African continent. It will expose students to the processes and patterns that have shaped modern African history. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the continent faces today. But, at the same time, it will also provide students with the knowledge to shatter the myths and stereotypes about Africa.

Japan Since 1600 (Formerly 43.295)

Description

A study of the traditional Japanese institutions and the transformation of Japan into a modern state after 1868: the Tokugawa Shogunate, Meiji Restoration, Russo-Japanese War, world power status, militarism, World War II, and present day Japan.

The French Revolution and Napoleon (Formerly 43.334)

Description

This course will involve students directly in critical consideration of the central events and issues of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods, with an eye to their longer-term historical resonances in France, Europe and beyond. The core problems we will be discussing are ones which have remained vital in modern and even contemporary political history: the nature of liberty, the nation and national identity, equality and inequalities, violence and terror in politics, the cult of the leader, war and empire.

The American West (Formerly 43.382)

Description

Involves readings and discussions of the history of the American frontier and the place of the frontier in American society and thought.

History of the Middle East and Islamic World (Formerly 43.393)

Description

This course examines the history of the Middle East and the Islamic World from the time of Muhammad to the present. It provides an introduction to the history of this often turbulent region. It exposes students to the processes and patterns that have shaped the history of the Islamic World. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the region faces today.

Legal Issues in Racism (Formerly 41.360)

Description

This course presents a study of racial discrimination in the United States. Emphasis is placed on relevant constitutional provisions, statutory provisions, and on United States Supreme Court cases.

International Law (Formerly 41.366)

Description

This course provides a broad introduction to international law with emphasis on current issues. Within public international law, topics covered will include the recognition of new states, organizations such as the United Nations and the European Union, the use of force, human rights, international crimes, the global environment, and international courts and tribunals. Within private international law, topics surveyed will include legal aspects of international trade and foreign investment, labor, intellectual property, cyber theft, and taxation. Current issues discussed will include global warming, recent corruption scandals, the Eurozone crisis, and legal issues facing global technology companies.

Family Law (Formerly 41.376)

Description

This course studies the critical family law issues facing society today. Subject matter examined may include the law of marriage, custody, adoption, divorce, child support, juveniles, right to die, fetal tissue transfer to prolong the life of another, reproduction control, and surrogate parenting. This course is taught from a legal and human values perspective.

Women and the Law (Formerly 41.381)

Description

This course presents legal issues that often or particularly affect women. Topics may include sex discrimination, sexual harassment, rape, marriage, divorce, reproductive control, surrogate motherhood, and custody.

Introduction to World Religions (Formerly 45.296)

Description

A study of religious knowledge and the phenomena of religion from a philosophical standpoint. The course considers explanations for religious behavior, some central issues in religious belief, and the values and goals of religious systems. Various world religions provide specific data for these topics.

Mysticism: East and West (Formerly 45.340)

Description

This course explores the religious and psychological phenomenon known as the mystical experience, both within the context of organized religion and outside it. We will approach this subject from a comparative standpoint, considering examples from Christianity, Judaism, and Islam and also from Eastern religions such as Buddhism and Taoism. We will make use of philosophy, psychology, theology and literature in order to try to understand mysticism and its relation to religion. Readings include The Upanishads, the Tao Te Ching, the Bible, and Plato. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Philosophies of Art and Beauty (Formerly 45.384)

Description

Examines the views of major philosophers on the beautiful and the nature of artistic creativity. An attempt is made to correlate the views of the thinkers with the works of poets, artists, and composers and the statements the latter have made about their work.

Introduction to Politics and Sports (Formerly 46.218)

Description

Analyzes the growing importance of sports in American life. Examines the psychological, political and social impact of sports on society. Discusses how sports have been shaped by such monumental events as war, the civil rights movement, and the changing economy.

Social Anthropology (Formerly 48.102)

Description

Using the comparative approach to society, this course examines several distinct cultures as a means of understanding both the universal constants and the variations in human societies.

French Speaking World (Formerly 50.310)

Description

Designed for prospective majors and minors in French as well as for those who have completed four years of high school or two years of college French. The course examines similarities and differences in the ethos of nations of the French-speaking world and in the life-styles of the individuals and groups that make them up. Conducted in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Italian Cinema and Culture (Formerly 52.378)

Description

A guide to contemporary Italian studies through literary and cultural approaches. The works of central figures in contemporary Italian letters are examined in view of their impact on Italian life. Emphasis is given to poets, novelists, the new cinema, the influences of existentialism, and the impact of America on Italian literature. Conducted in Italian/English.

Literature, Politics and Genocide in Cambodia (Formerly 59.349)

Description

This course will examine various literary and political responses to the Cambodian genocide, particularly personal accounts or literary testimony by survivors and government sanctioned legal proceedings. The course will consider how the literary and political responses to the Cambodian genocide have at different times paralleled, complimented and opposed each other. The course will also ask whether their overall effect contributes to or detracts from the serving of justice and the process of healing for the survivors. To pursue these questions, we will read selections from novels and poetry written by Cambodian survivors side by side with accounts of political activities of the Cambodian government and the international community to bring the perpetrators of the genocide to justice.

Introduction to Spanish Literature (Formerly 54.301)

Description

Studies the history of Spain's literature in its general trends and through its major writers revealing the complicated series of interactions, conflict, and influences which have molded the unique character of the nation. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLSP.2120 Spanish 4 and Culture, or WLSP.2040 Intensive Spanish 3 and 4, or WLSP.2990 Language-Spanish 2000 level elective.

Spanish Civilization and Culture (Formerly 54.310)

Description

Considers Spanish culture and civilization up to the present. Through audiovisual aids, current newspapers and selected readings, the student will explore the Spanish way of being, thinking, and living. Emphasis is placed on the main contributions of Spain to the Western world. Conducted in Spanish only.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLSP 2120 Spanish 4 and Culture or WLSP 2040 Intensive Spanish 3 & 4.