All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


20th Century Art (Formerly 79.221)

Description

A study of American and European movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1900 to the present. Emphasis is placed on Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, International Style, Pop, Op Art, Minimal Art, Photorealism, and Post-Modernism.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ARHI 2030 History of Art:Preh-Med and ARHI 2040 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod or Studio Art Minor or Art Minor.

American Studies Seminar (Formerly 40.401)

Description

A required seminar for American studies majors normally taken during the second semester of the junior year or during the senior year. Students undertake a research project leading to the writing of a major paper with a theme that combines more than one discipline.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Junior Status or ENGL 2480, AMST 2480 or 59.248.

Directed Studies in American Studies (Formerly 40.491)

Description

An investigation of a topic using an interdisciplinary approach and leading to the writing of a majorpaper. The course provides an opportunity for a student to work closely with an instructor on atopic of special interest.

Twentieth Century Art (Formerly 58.221)

Description

A study of American and European movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1900 to the end of the millenium. Emphasis is placed on Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, International Style, Pop, Op Art, Minimal Art, Photorealism, and Post-Modernism. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ARHI 2040 History of Art ll:Ren - Mod, or ARHI 1010 Art Appreciation, or Permission of Instructor.

Internship: Atmospheric Science (Formerly 85.493)

Description

Work experience with private or public employer. Written report and supervisor evaluation required.

Honors Research: Atmospheric Science (Formerly 85.495)

Description

An individual or team research project carried out by qualified students with the approval of and supervision by a faculty member.

Research: Atmospheric Science

Description

An independent scientific research project carried out by a qualified senior under the supervision of a faculty member.

Biochemistry Techniques (Formerly 81.421)

Description

A series of discussions and "hands on" laboratory exercises emphasizing techniques and use of equipment most commonly employed in biochemicaI-biomedicaI research laboratories. Techniques to be mastered include: cell culture, cell fractionation, enzyme purification, ultracentrifugation, UV-visible spectrophotometry, spectrofluorometry, various types of chromatography (thin layer, gas, gel exclusion, ion exchange), electrophoresis, liquid scintillation spectrometry, and the safe handling and application of radioisotopes to problems in biochemistry. Wherever possible, the principles presented in 81.419 will be used as a basis for experimentation using the above techniques. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: BIOL 2330L Experimental Methods in Biology, and CHEM 2300L Organic Chem Lab II. Pre-Req or Co-Req BIOL 4190 Biochemistry

The Responsible Chemist (Formerly 84.360)

Description

This course is required of chemistry majors and addresses ethical, regulatory, and environmental aspects of their profession. Students are exposed to a wide range of research integrity issues that include TSCA (Toxic Substance Control Act), SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) and quality management. Compliance issues include an overview of OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), as well as an introduction to patent law. The importance of maintaining integrity in their discipline is emphasized, and case studies are presented for study and discussion. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE) and Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Chemistry Majors Only

Unit Operations Laboratory (Formerly 10.315)

Description

Students perform laboratory base experimental analyses in fluid flow and heat transfer and fluid flow and heat transfer unit operations processes common in Chemical Engineering practice. The course is team based and students are expected to develop and improve in their ability to work and interact in a group environment. Written and oral reports are required. Safety in both lad and industrial practice are emphasized. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEN.2020 Energy Balance & Introduction to Thermodynamics, and CHEN.3030 Fluid Mechanics, and ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Co-req: CHEN.3040 Heat Transfer.

Capstone Seminar in Criminology & Criminal Justice (Formerly 44.489)

Description

This course is designed to provide criminal justice majors with a capstone experience emphasizing integration of knowledge acquired in previous courses on the causes of criminal behavior and responses to it, particularly the institutions, policies and practices of the criminal justice system. Students engage in the development and production of a senior level research paper grounded in relevant criminology and criminal justice literature.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CRIM 1010 Criminal Justice System, CRIM 2210 Criminology l, CRIM 3900 CJ Research Methods and Senior-level standing.

Statistics for Business and Economics II (Formerly 49.212)

Description

Discusses interval estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, applied regression theory, correlation analysis, and other selected topics.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON 2110 Statistics I or 92.183 Intro to Statistics or MATH 2830 Introduction to Statistics.

Financial Markets and Monetary Policy (Formerly 49.318)

Description

The economics of financial intermediation and central bank monetary policy. Evaluation of global financial markets, financial deregulation, bank failures and financial stability, determinants of the level and term structure of interest rates, and the impacts of monetary policy changes on overall levels of output, employment and prices are topics analyzed in this course. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON 2010 Economics I (Microeconomics) and ECON 2020 Economics II (Macroeconomics).

Oral & Written Communication for Computer Science (Formerly 42.220)

Description

The main goal of this course is to enhance the student's understanding of the elements of effective communication, and to put that knowledge into practice in a supportive, co-operative, workshop environment. Limited to Computer Science majors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL 1020 College Writing II; Computer Science Majors only.

Shakespeare I (Formerly 42.423)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Shakespeare II (Formerly 42.424)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies not covered in 42.243. Shakespeare I is not a prerequisite.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Engineering Capstone Design Project (Formerly 25.401)

Description

Integrative design experience in engineering. Students work on multi-disciplinary teams and apply their engineering problem-solving skills on open-ended, real-world projects Projects may be service-oriented in concept and teams may include members from other Departments and Colleges. Emphasis on communication, team-work, report-writing, oral presentations, This course may be used as a Technical elective for all Engineering Departments. Alternatively, this course may be used as a substitute for the culminating Capstone course in Electrical and Computer Engineering (16.499), Mechanical Engineering (22.423) and Plastics Engineering (26.416). Prerequisite: senior status & permission of instructor.

Prerequisites

Level Senior Standing.

Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Formerly ENTR/64.300)

Description

Course number was formerly 64.300. This course is designed to help non-business students understand the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship in today's global economy and cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset among students in the Manning School of Business entrepreneurship concentration. It will cover different forms of entrepreneurship such as small businesses, growth ventures, corporate entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship. The course will focus on the types of innovation, turning innovation into an ongoing new venture and on the entrepreneurial process. Innovation and entrepreneurship theories and concepts will be discussed with real life examples and cases.

Prerequisites

Requisite: Sophomore level or higher.

Internship: Environmental Studies (Formerly 87.493)

Description

Work experience with private or public employer. Written report and supervisor evaluation required. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Honors Research: Environmental Studies (Formerly 87.495)

Description

An individual or team research project carried out by qualified students with the approval of and supervision by a faculty member. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Research: Environmental Studies

Description

An independent scientific research project carried out by a qualified senior under the supervision of a faculty member.

Exercise Physiology II Laboratory (Formerly 38.408)

Description

This course is designed to provide the student with hands on experience in a variety of laboratory techniques and field techniques for the assessment of human performance. All exercise physiology undergraduate courses (number 38) are restricted to EP majors only. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Co-req: EXER.4060 Exercise Physiology II.

BLA Capstone (Formerly 59.413)

Description

This course is conducted as a directed study, where by the BLA students in their senior year work with their advisor to identify a problem or issue that will be analyzed in the interdisciplinary way using knowledge gained from the students' two BLA Concentration courses, as well as Minor courses, when applicable. The students develop a research plan and produce a final project for grading by their advisor. The students are required to meet with/report to their advisor during the semester according to an agreed upon schedule. IN some cases, a practicum or internship can serve as the basis of the course; however, a final project is still required.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: FAHS 2130 Foundations in Liberal Studies, and (ENGL 1020 College Writing ll or HONR.1100)

Environmental Geochemistry (Formerly 89.315)

Description

Application of geochemical principles to environmental problems including air pollution and atmospheric processes, climate change, water chemistry and water-rock interactions, and the transport and dispersal of organic and inorganic pollutants. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: CHEM.1210 Chemistry I, and CHEM.1230L Chemistry I Lab.

Internship: Environmental Geoscience (Formerly 89.493)

Description

Work experience with private or public employer. Written report and supervisor evaluation required. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Honors Research: Geoscience (Formerly 89.495)

Description

An independent scientific research project carried out by a qualified senior under the supervision of a faculty member. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Research: Geoscience

Description

An independent scientific research project carried out by a qualified senior under the supervision of a faculty member.

Research Seminar (Formerly 43.432)

Description

Systematic research in primary and secondary sources culminating in the writing of an original research paper using proper methodological and stylistic techniques. Weekly meetings and written and oral progress reports. Students must be acquainted with word-processing techniques. Required of all History majors. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Senior Seminar II (Formerly 92.475)

Description

Undergraduate seminar on advanced mathematical topics. Students are required to develop an understanding of an advanced subject beyond the scope of an existing course or synthesize two or more different areas form their curriculum. Students are required to participate in the seminar, present their results to the Department and write a substantial thesis in their topic area. Essential course elements include library research, original research, and both verbal and written exposition. The first semester is a graduation requirement for majors in mathematics.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH.3750 or MATH.4740 Senior Seminar I.

Capstone Design (Formerly 22.423)

Description

Students perform independent design work and participate in team efforts to develop conceptual designs from functional requirements. Perform design analysis and synthesis, modeling, fabrication, testing, cost estimating, and documenting the essential elements of the system design. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Information Literacy (IL), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: MECH 3110, MECH 3220, MECH 3820 ,MECH 4510, MECH 4730.

Professional Communications (Formerly MKTG 210/66.210)

Description

This course provides students with the theory and practice of successful oral and written communication in business. Emphasis is on the development and improvement of communication skills needed for today's fast-paced organizations. Such skills include written communication in short memos and reports, including the use of conferencing technology to convey information. Additionally, the course focuses on oral communication through presentations and discussions as well as the use of current presentation software.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Business majors & ENGL.1020 College Writing 2 or equiv.

Clinical Immunology (Formerly 36.331)

Description

An introduction to the principles of immunology including: the study of antigens and antibodies and their interactions and controls; description of cellular events and the immune response, and in vivo and in vitro antigen-antibody interactions with clinical relevance. Immunological aspects of transplantation, autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies and cancer pathogenesis are also discussed. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 36.360 Human Biochemistry.

Music History 2 (Formerly 74.262)

Description

Analyzes musical forms and styles from 1750 to present.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: MUHI 1010 European Art Music, and MUHI 1020 Intro to Non Euro Musics, or MUHI 1040 Musical Practices 1 and MUHI 1050 Musical Practices 2 and MUHI 2610 Music History I.

Role Transition (Formerly 33.413)

Description

This capstone course focuses on the transition to the professional nursing role. Content includes professional issues, trends, and leadership and management principles which impact on nursing practice. Students analyze nursing practice in relation to the standards of professional performance. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Co-Req: NURS.4140 Role Practicum.

Leadership in Nursing (Formerly 33.420)

Description

This course focuses on leadership roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for the professional nurse. Course content includes professional issues, trends, and leadership and managerial principles pertinent to healthcare and nursing practice. Students explore professional perspectives, norms, and ethical standards essential in values-driven management and leadership.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Nursing (BS); RN's Only.

Senior Research in Nutrition(Formerly 36.496)

Description

Continuation of 36.494. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL), Information Literacy (IL), and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Integrative Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies (Formerly PCS 453/553)

Description

The purpose of the integrative seminar is to assist students in developing a robust and mature understanding of the three PCS core questions as they relate to PCS coursework. With a strong evidence focus, students identify patterns, principles, questions, and dilemmas relevant to the core questions emerge from multiple courses they have taken within the PCS program. Students develop a reflective journal, a series of essays, a portfolio of their accumulated work, and a culminating portfolio presentation. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: PCST.1250 Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies; and Peace and Conflict Studies major or undeclared.

Senior Capstone

Description

This course is designed to provide philosophy majors with a capstone project involving integration of their coursework in philosophy in the form of an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The capstone will be taken during the senior year (students in the Communications program may take the Practicum instead of the Capstone). The class is designed to meet the Essential Learning Outcomes of Written and Oral Communication, Applied and Integrative Learning, and Information Literacy.

Prerequisites

Junior or above standing and permission of Instructor.

Practicum (Formerly 45.496)

Description

The practicum is a 3-credit internship at a professional site relevant to the student's course of study. Students are required to write a term paper at the end of their internship.

Health Physics Capstone (Formerly 95.453)

Description

This course will provide the B.S. candidate in Physics (Radiological Health Physics option) with an undergraduate capstone experience through basic independent research, including critical thinking, problem solving, report writing, and presentation skills.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: Senior Status.

Physics Capstone (Formerly 95.454)

Description

This course will provide the graduating physics major with a capstone experience through an exposure to the rudiments of independent research; incorporating critical thinking, problem-solving, report-writing, and presentation skills learnt in the course of the undergraduate curriculum. Prerequisite: Senior Status.

Process Control (Formerly 26.404)

Description

Basic principles of control systems used with plastics processing equipment. Included are instrumentation, signal conditioning, data acquisition, feedback control, process monitoring, data reduction, and SPC/SQC. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Critical Thinking & Problem Solving (CTPS) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MATH 2340 Differential Equations or MATH 2360 Eng Differential Equations.

Capstone Project I (Formerly 26.415)

Description

A two-semester capstone laboratory project course. Student groups design, perform, analyze, report, and defend a research project which incorporates the processing and characterization of plastics materials. Supporting practicums on literature searches, plastics processing, basic plastics testing techniques, and data analysis are included in the course.

Prerequisites

Co-req: PLAS 0010 or PLAS 0020 Plastics Safety Lecture; and Senior Status.

Latin American Politics (Formerly 46.370)

Description

The context, background and forces shaping the contemporary politics of the Latin American region.

Women in Islam (Formerly 46.402)

Description

Focusing upon one of the most important topics in Islam, this course will go beyond conventional stereotypes and explore woman's many and varied roles within Islamic cultures and societies.

The Politics of Identity in the Middle East (Formerly 46.406)

Description

The course will examine the ethnic, political, religious and social changes in the modern Middle East. The course will start with an introduction to the diverse identities all over the Middle East and then it will comparatively examine a number of those identities.

Dynamics Power and Authority (Formerly 46.411/57.511)

Description

This course surveys theories of power, authority, participation, and politics. Building on these theories, students will examine changing social, political, and economic patterns of inequality based on class, race (and related divisions of ethnicity, religion, caste, nationality), and gender. Reviews various approaches to altering these dynamics (business strategy, public policy, community and social movements). Cuts across units of firm, community, region, and nation, along with corresponding governmental institutions, and links theoretical analysis with study of practical problem solving. Instructor-initiated cases drawn from a variety of national experiences. Students will learn techniques of power analysis and prepare a power analysis project.

Reading and Simulation Experience International Organization (Formerly 46.420)

Description

Students take part in a simulation of the proceedings of a regional or international organization, e.g., U.N., O.A.S., O.A.U., or the Arab League. They study all aspects of the selected institution but concentrate on key economic, social and security issues discussed in the body's debates. The course aims to give the student a clearer understanding of the forces and constraints which shape the foreign policies of individual states.

Justice and Trade in the Global Economy (Formerly 46.439)

Description

We know that we are part of a global economy and that many of the things we buy and consume are produced in other countries. But what do we know of how they are made? Do we understand that there may be hidden costs in the price we pay for goods at the supermarket, in a department store? Understanding the nature of global trade is critical for us to be effective citizens in the world. Perhaps more important is that we understand how goods are produced and traded - what many think of as "fair" trade. The subject of Fair Trade isn't simply limited to the production and sale of coffee and chocolate. Fair Trade principles encompass environmental issues, human rights, and politics. Once aware of the ramifications of consumerism on all parts of the world, including the United States, people can make informed choices about the products they buy, the companies that employ them, and the political views they support. By the end of this course students should understand the major ideas and tools used to comprehend complex international and global trade relations. Students will understand the way in which goods are produced for global markets and the possible human and environmental costs such production entails.

Politics of Repression and Dissent (Formerly 46.445)

Description

A focus on the dark side of politics - political repression, including politically motivated imprisonment, torture, murder, and disappearance- and the struggle of critics to bring about change through non-violent and violent demonstrations, general strikes and armed resistance.

The Politics of Discord between the Arab East and The West (Formerly 46.446)

Description

The course examines the roots of political discord in the Arab East starting with colonialism and progressing to the contemporary state of dissension. Throughout the course the stress on the effect of this discord on comparative domestic politics and international relations in the region will be examined.

Theories of Political and Criminal Violence (Formerly 46.447)

Description

The study of violence has been a central piece of debates in comparative politics that range from the causes of revolution to the analysis of civil wars. This course aims to provide a broad overview of different bodies of research on violence. The class will also revisit crucial debates in the study of violence, such as the problems of separating criminal and political violence (such as interstate wars). By the end of the class, students will be able to identify major theoretical and methodological approaches to violence, major debates and concepts, as well as key cases across the world.

Prerequisites

Junior or Senior Status.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Selected Topics.

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as racism, diversity, empowerment, and social change in the contest of social and community life. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Racism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is racism. In this course we will investigate roots of racism, kinds of racism, reasons for perpetuation of racism, possible solutions to ending racism. Many believer that racism is a thing of the past. Yet, research shows that many of us are unconsciously racist and hurt communities of color without any malicious intent. We will explore our own posting in terms of racism. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Immigration

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is immigration, a very important issue in the United States and around the world. In this seminar we will study the complex process of migration from a community social psychological point of view. Motivations, expectations, acculturation, immigrant status, deportations, policy and more will be covered. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Prevent Youth Violence

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is youth violence, which continues to be a major public health concern in the United States. Preventing youth violence is an important component of creating peaceful and safe neighborhoods and just communities. In this course, we will use ecological and multicultural perspectives to understand different types of youth violence, the contexts in which they occur, and intervention strategies to address the violence. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Community Psychology: Bridging Differences

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in community psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course explores dilemmas that can emerge when working to bridge diverse groups in community-based work. The seminar will be organized around narratives that address multiple dimensions of diversity including race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, and religion. Too often, guidelines for addressing very complex diversity dynamics are presented as neatly packaged lists of recommendations. However, it is within the stories of the challenges and dilemmas that the complexity of the political, historical, social, and psychological dynamics of diversity are most evident. Students will explore examples of everyday diversity challenges and utilize psychological theories to better understand how the challenges can be shaped by struggles over limited resources, deep historical conflicts between groups, privilege dynamics, intragroup dynamics, organizational cultural norms, and/or other issues. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology (Formerly 47.473)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as social aspects of health and illness; inequalities in education; the impact of globalization; attitude formation and prejudice; and psychology of sex roles. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Social (In)justice

Description

An advances seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The topic of this seminar is social injustice, its causes, manifestations, explanations, and social psychological theories that help us understand them. We will explore how and why social injustice prevails in today's world full of resources; why small number of people own majority of world's wealth; why some countries are poorer than others. We will study our own standpoints and where they come from and we will work on possible remedies that could lead to a more just world.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Achievement Motivation

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course will cover psychological theory and research on the various factors that explain people's motivation to achieve and their performance in different domains. These factors include emotions, needs, personality, efficiency, group membership, identity, goal type, and context. Course goals include honing students' ability to understand, critique, write about, and discuss theoretical and empirical papers within psychology. Students will also develop their skills in generating testable hypotheses. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: the Mind-Body Perspective in Communication

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on the role communication processes (including Intra-Personal, interpersonal, and Mediated-Communication) play in a variety of health related contexts, effects, and processes. Included will be: Self-regulation theories; placebo and nocebo effects; unconscious processes; biofeedback effects and mechanisms; hypnosis; imagery; pain management; emotion regulation; well-being; and the ability to consciously influence autonomic processes such as the immune and endocrine systems. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Health Campaigns

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will review the stat of the science and art of effective medial health campaigns in light o how they are developed, delivered, and evaluated. Seminar participants will discuss and critically analyze campaigns relative to their effects on health-related awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Workplace Diversity

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Over the course of our lives, many of us will be working in organizations that include diverse workers, and thus it is important to understand the issues that shape interpersonal and system dynamics within such settings. In this seminar, we review theories and research relevant to how race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and disability dynamics affect workplace systems. Classes will be highly interactive and discussion-oriented as students learn about the challenges diverse organizations face in fostering positive working relationships and about strategies adopted to enhance the effectiveness of the diverse workplace. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Social Psychology: Psychology of Sustainability

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in social psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. In this course we will explore unequal distribution of resources and power and the culture of consumerism in all parts of the world, including the United States. Once people are aware can make informed choices about what and why and how much they buy, about the companies that produce and sell the products and the political views they support. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology (Formerly 47.474)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as psychology of the family and parent-child relations; infant development; adjustment during adulthood; and death and dying. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Adolescent Identity

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will explore the phenomenon of adolescent identity development, beginning with Erik Erikson's seminal work on the subject and continuing through contemporary treatments. We will examine development of identity from extended consciousness, a sense of autobiographical self (1-2 years), to a theory of mind (4-5 years), conception of a personal fable (10-14 years), and the emergence of full life stories (17-25 years). Specific issues of focus will include ethnic, social class, and gender role identity development, identity crises and resolutions, and representations of relationships with family, friends, school, and work. Students will write and analyze their own life stories, as well as lead discussions, and prepare a research paper. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: Psychology of Education

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar takes an intensive look at the psychology of education and of learning. We will read about theories of education, research on learning, and study some historical and current trends in both formal education (school) and informal learning environments (hobby subcultures, museums,camps, etc). Readings will include both historical examples (John Dewey, Jane Addams, Paolo Friere) and schooling systems, and policymakers in higher education. In addition to reading, class discussion, and engaging hands on exercises, students will plan and deliver a term-length creative project on the psychology of learning and education. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Developmental Psychology: The Role of Trauma in Child Development

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in developmental psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Trauma is a relatively common experience of childhood. Far too many children and youth in the US are witnesses to domestic violence and victims of abuse, neglect, and other violent crimes. Worldwide, millions of children have been disabled, injured, orphaned, or recruited as child soldiers in armed conflicts. When natural disasters strike, children are often among those affected most severely. How do these experiences influence subsequent growth and development? This seminar examines the role of trauma in child development form an ecological perspective with a focus on neurophysiological, affective, and relational systems. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology (Formerly 47.475)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as health psychology and behavioral medicine; the nature and causes of or interventions for specific psychological disorders (e.g.,autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia); the community mental health movement; clinical methods of assessment. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Women's Health

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Physical health and illness do not occur in a vacuum. Rather, they are embedded in a complex and dynamic system. This biological (e.g., disease process), psychological (e.g., mental health status) and social (e.g., culture) factors. Topics will include reproductive health, cardiovascular illness, substance use, and eating behaviors. Sexual orientation, race, socioeconomic status and other issues of diversity will be integrated throughout the semester. Students will learn from reading and discussing scholarly articles and book chapters, critically watching relevant videos, and writing individual literature review papers. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Autism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological disorder that typically appears before the age of three and immediately and profoundly affects a young child's ability to communicate, develop language, form social relationships and respond appropriately to environmental cues. Over the last 15-20 years, autism has received an increasing level of attention in both scientific arenas and the popular press. Most recent estimates are that about 1 in 50 children are affected. This seminar will examine issues in the etiology, characteristics and treatment of autism and related developmental disabilities. The seminar will also explore some of the more prominent theories and controversies surrounding these disorders. Much of the seminar will be focused on a behavioral approach to understanding and treating children with autism and significant intellectual challenges. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology & Behavioral Medicine

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course examines physical health and illness by integrating information about biological processes, psychological characteristics, and social contexts. We will discuss the following topics throughout the course: the roles of personality, emotion, mental health, and human development in physical well-being; the relationship between health psychology and other disciplines such as nursing, anthropology and genetics; the significance of prevention and public policy in physical health; and the ways in which health psychology is important in a variety of health problems, such as heart disease, cancer, and obesity. This i s a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Language Assessment and Intervention in Autism

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of behavioral language assessments and empirically validated interventions to improve language and communication for young children with autism and related disabilities. Successful completion of the course will help prepare students for a position as a behavior technician. Students will participate in class discussions, presentations, and application activities throughout the semester. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Autism in Adolescents & Young Adults

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on adolescents and young adults on the "high-functioning" end of the autism spectrum. Students will learn the behavioral and psychological characteristics associated with this population, diagnostic procedures, etiology, consider various interventions for this population, and discuss current controversies in the field. We will also consider the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on individual and their families. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Clinical Psychology: Sexual Offending

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in clinical psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The purpose of this course is to examine current psychological theory and research relating to the causes and consequences of sexual aggression. It is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists. The course is organized topically. We begin by reading and thinking about the social construction of masculinity and femininity (especially through representations in the media) and how these constructions might contribute to sexual aggression. The bulk of the course is devoted to an examination of psychological processes related to victimization and perpetration. The course concludes with a discussion of several special topics and an examination of rape prevention and education. Special topics may include a focus on juvenile and female offenders, specific risk factors for perpetration, campus sexual assault, pedophilia, child maltreatment, pornography, recidivism rates, offender laws, and victim testimonies. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends (Formerly 47.477)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider current trends in psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as contemporary models of addictive behavior; the interaction of psychology and law; existential psychology; psychology of technological change. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Addictions

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. The focus of this seminar is on the psychology of addictions. Drawing upon current theory and research, we will look at the nature and causes of the problem behaviors associated with alcohol and drug use. We will also consider whether problems in such areas as shopping, eating, gambling, sex, video games, and the Internet can be understood as forms of addictions. In addition, we will examine the implications of whether or not such addictions should be viewed as diseases, and we will evaluate the relative importance of biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2320 Psychology of Personality, or PSYC.2720 Abnormal Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Psychology & Law

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This course is an introduction to many topics representing major fields of study within psychology and law. Topics may include: eyewitness testimony, lie detection, jury selection, child protection, forensic interviews, and the death penalty. In this course, students will learn about the diversity of interests among legal findings. The main goal is to provide students with an understanding of relevant theory, empirical findings, and research methodology. Guest speakers will enhance learning. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSYC.3050 Psychology and Law.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Generational Identities and Relations

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar will focus on generational identities and intergenerational relations. Generation is an important dimension of human experience in modern societies and a key aspect of self-identity, but it is also linked to tensions and misunderstandings between people of different ages. Specific topics to be addressed include: cultural and historical differences in ideas about generation and cohort; the development of generational identities: generation, mass marketing, and consumerism; the politics of generation and intergenerational tensions; bilateral socialization and positive intergenerational exchange; similarities and differences between Baby Boomers. Gen-X'ers, and Millennials; ageism and age segregation, and; generativity and the future of our planet. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2600 Child & Adolescent Development, and PSYC.2690 Research I; Methods.

Seminar in Contemporary Trends: Psychology of Globalization

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special current topics in psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. We know that we are part of a global world and that many of the things we buy and consume are produced in other countries. But what do we know of how they are made: Do we understand that there may be hidden costs in the price we pay for goods at the supermarket, in a coffee shop: Understanding the nature of globalization and its consequences is critical for us to be effective citizens in the world. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2090 Social Psychology, or PSYC.2550 Community Psychology, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods.

Seminar in Cognitive Psychology (Formerly 47.478)

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in cognitive psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as attention and memory; mental imagery; decision-making; language; applications of cognitive psychology to education. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science and PSYC.2690 Research I:Methods.

Seminar in Cognitive Psychology: Educational Applications

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in cognitive psychology with focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. This seminar is designed to give you an in-depth look into the impact of cognitive psychology on education. We will look at basic processes, including those of attention, memory, and motivation, starting first from basic theoretical principles. We will then read papers that have taken these theoretical principles as a starting point and applied them to real-life issues in education, such as exam performance and students' self-evaluations of their own performance. This is a writing-intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSYC.2780 Cognitive Psychology.

Seminar in Behavioral Psychology

Description

An advanced seminar to consider special topics in behavioral psychology, with special focus on critique of the theoretical and empirical literature, identification of future research pathways, and the potential for application with consideration of ethics and social responsibility. Specific topics will vary and may include such topics as conceptual issues in behavioral psychology; applied behavior analysis; and the applications of behavioral psychology to education, language, symbolic behavior, and attention. This is a writing intensive course.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: PSYC.1010 Intro to Psychological Science, and PSYC.2690 Research I: Methods, and PSY.2760 Theories of Learning, or PSYC.3120 Learning and Behavior.

Chemicals and Health (Formerly 31.371)

Description

Provides a broad overview of how the design, manufacture, use and disposal of chemicals and chemical products affect health and ecosystems. Provides an in-depth overview of how chemicals are monitored in the environment (including biomonitoring), how their risks are characterized, and the prevention of chemical risks through safer chemical design. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: HSCI 2510 Physiological Chem I, HSCI 2520 Physiological Chem II, 31.313 Prin of Environmental Health or Public Health (BS).

Communication Techniques in Health Promotion (Formerly 31.405)

Description

This course focuses upon the communication techniques and mass media approaches necessary to promote and implement effective health promotion programs and activities. Awareness and sensitivity toward cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity will be particularly emphasized when discussing various communication techniques in relation to particular health issues. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre.req: PUBH.3011 Program Planning in Health Promotion,and Public Health Majors only or instructor Permission.

Foundations of Social Analysis (Formerly 48.201)

Description

This intermediate-level class deepens students' analytical skills beyond intro level preparing for more abstract work in Theory and Methods courses. It also prepares students for more complex integration of theory, methods and issue content in 300 level courses. This course will attend to developing students' ability to recognize, and write social science research papers.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: SOCI.1010 Intro to Sociology; Sociology majors.

Quebec Literature and Culture

Description

This course explores the culture and literature of French-speaking Quebec. Through essays, literary readings, songs, works of art, and film, students will follow the development of this province of Canada from its origins as a French colony through the exodus of French-Canadians in the early twentieth century and the Revolution Tranquille of the 1960's, up to the present day. Conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: WLFR.2110 French 3 and Culture.

Survey of French Literature (Formerly 50.301)

Description

A panoramic survey of French Literatue based on the history and civilization of France from the Middle Ages to the XXth (20th) Century, through readings in the original French language of excerpts from milestone novels, theater and poetry. Class conducted in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Survey of Francophone Literature (Formerly 50.302)

Description

A survey of contemporary Francophone Literature of African, European, and North American French speaking countries since 1960 until today.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Special Topics: in Fancophone Studies (Formerly 50.303)

Description

An in-depth study of a specific topic in literature, culture, civilization or cinema from the French-speaking world. Class discussions, readings, oral and written work all in French. May be repeated once for credit, if content changes, and with written consent of the Instructor.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture or WLFR 3990 Elective.

French Speaking World (Formerly 50.310)

Description

Designed for prospective majors and minors in French as well as for those who have completed four years of high school or two years of college French. The course examines similarities and differences in the ethos of nations of the French-speaking world and in the life-styles of the individuals and groups that make them up. Conducted in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Francophone Communities in North America (Formerly 50.315)

Description

This course introduces the concept of "Francophonie" and describes the origins of the main francophone communities left in North America: Quebec, Acadia and New-Foundland in Canada, and Louisiana and New England (including Lowell) in the U.S. The primary focus of this class is Culture, history and language (different varieties of French spoken by those communities). Class conducted in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Contemporary French Civilization and Culture (Formerly 50.320)

Description

In this course we look closely at some fundamental issues reflecting the rapidly changing paramters of French culture and society today; the question of national identity and cultural hybridite, the relationship between the evolving types of family relations and new forms of social and political contracts; the crucial personal problems faced by the young, the poor, the immigrant and the elderly in an increasingly multicultural Hexagone attempting to define its place, role and funcation within the recently defined Europe unit and the new global world order; the current status of women; the relashionship between cities and ghettos, violence and crime; the nature of emerging forms of cultural production within new trends and styles of modernite.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Contemporary French Cinema (Formerly 50.340)

Description

Provides a critical appreciation of contemporary French cinema (1985-today) aiming at sorting out its eclecticism and focusing on the following aspects: 1) French cultural exception in the European Union: cultural integration and national identity; 2) Representation of the ongoing social and moral changes in contemporary France; 3) The new generation of French filmmakers. Class taught in French.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.

Francophone Identity through Cinema (Formerly 50.380)

Description

Provides a critical appreciation of the notion of Francophone identity through modern and contemporary (1970-today) Francophone cinema from diverse places such as but not limited to North Africa, West Africa (especially Senegal), Canada (especially Quebec) the Caribbean, Belgium, and Switzerland. The course is aiming at showing the evolution of the Francophone identity in the postcolonial period until now and is focusing on the following aspects: 1) The emergence and importance of postcolonial Francophone cinema in the 1970s as a "cinema engage" (especially Sembene Ousmane in Senegal); 2) Contemporary issues of the postcolonial Francophone societies through films; 3) Representations of the cultural diversity in Francophone films; 4) Identity, race and immigration, women's status issues.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLFR 2110 French 3 and Culture, or WLFR 2120 French 4 and Culture or WLAN 3990 Elective.