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Contemporary Art and Culture (Formerly 79.352)

Description

Examination of issues of content, theory, and criticism in contemporary and traditional art and culture. Topics vary. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ARHI 2030 History of Art:Preh-Med and ARHI 2040 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod or Studio Art Minor or Art Minor.

Aesthetics and Critical Studies of Graphic Design (Formerly 79.360)

Description

Examination of the aesthetic theories and practice of graphic design. Significant practitioners of the art will be highlighted.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ARHI 2030 History of Art:Preh-Med and ARHI 2040 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod or Studio Art Minor or Art Minor.

Values in American Culture (Formerly 40/42.248)

Description

Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists. Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Family in American Literature (Formerly 40.257)

Description

A study of literary selections dealing with traditions of family life, the individual, and social change. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Art Appreciation (Formerly 58.101)

Description

The course introduces the student to the technical, aesthetic and historical aspects of architecture, sculpture, and painting. An analysis of the visual elements used in fine arts such as color, line, shape, texture, and principles of design are developed through slide lectures, museum visits and assigned readings. In addition, students investigate the purposes of art and visual communication and develop a heightened sense of critical thinking that allows them to investigate successfully different modes of representation, styles and media in a multicultural society.

Comparative Arts (Formerly 58.105)

Description

This course studies the aesthetic, artistic and intellectual similarities between art history and music history. Discussion of the arts focuses on the development in examining the human creativity and expression through the arts: from ancient times as art and morality followed in the Renaissance as art and sciences continued in the Enlightenment as art and society contrasted in the nineteenth century as art and entertainment. Furthermore, this course surveys some of the fundamental aspects of music and art, such as the nature of aesthetic judgment, the task of art and music criticism, including formalist, representational, and contemporary theories on viewing, analyzing, and interpreting the arts. In addition, with a comparative analysis between the modes of visual and aural representation, visual and aural perception, this course analyzes the principal forms and genres of the visual and aural elements of art history and music history, providing an understanding for human creativity and expression. Spring, alternate years.

History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art (Formerly 58.203)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Medeival period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from Ancient Egypt and Near East, Antiquity, Byzantine and Medeival, and Early Renassance Europe. Methodological problems of interpretation, formal analysis and aesthetic principles are studies in these art works.

History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art (Formerly 58.204)

Description

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance times to the Modern period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from the Renaisance, Baroque, Rococo, Nineteenth Century Movements-Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism and Abstract Art. The aim of the course is to introduce the student to basic critical and art historical methods as well as the analysis of style and content within sequential cultural contexts.

History of Architecture (Formerly 58.206)

Description

A survey of the major technical and stylistic developments in ecclesiastical and secular architecture from Prehistory to the present day studied with an emphasis on the major monuments (Parthenon, Pantheon, Gothic Cathedrals, St. Peter's, Versailles Palace, Eiffel Tower, Guggenheim Museum). Spring, alternate years.

Studies In World Art (Formerly 58.302)

Description

Historical and critical examination of regions works of art from China, Asia, the Islamic world, India, Africa, North America, Latin America, Native American Art and Mexico. Topics vary from year to year. Course may be repeated.

American Art (Formerly 58.313)

Description

The study of American painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Colonial period to the end of the nineteenth century seen in relation to European developments and American social and technological changes. Emphasis is placed on New England architecture.

American Architecture (Formerly 58.314)

Description

This course begins with a discussion of native American building traditions and proceeds chonologically from the 17th through the 20th centuries. Students will gain a familiarity with the major movements in American architecture (such as Colonial, Greek Revival, Victorian, Arts and Crafts, City Beautiful, International Style, Postmodern) as well as the leading archiects such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Frank Gehry. The architecture is discussed in its historical context with attention to the inventions, materials and aesthetic assumptions that made it possible.

Modern Architecture (Formerly 58.315)

Description

This course will examine global architecture from the 19th century to the present. It addresses the major movements, "-isms", architects, publications, schools, and technological innovations that contributed to varied (and often conflicting) notions of "Modern architecture." Growing nationalism and politics, travel and colonial occupation, the effects of war, and changing conceptions of nature and science, all transformed the built environment. This course will provide a better understanding not only of individual works but also of the ways architecture manifests important themes such as nationalism, regionalism, functionalism, rationalism, and the most current theme, happiness.

Asian Art (Formerly 58.331)

Description

The purpose of this course is to provide a general overview of the art of the traditional cultures of Asia, China, India and Japan. This survey provides a critical and historical examination of these cultures.

The Golden Age of Spanish Art

Description

This course is a survey of art in Spain from the discovery of the Americas in 1492 through the mid-seventeenth. This roughly 150-year period, known as the Spanish Golden Age or Siglo de Oro, witnessed the expansion of the Spanish empire across the Atlantic and Asia and gave rise to many of Spain's greatest artistic achievements. This course will survey the unprecedented contributions of Spanish painters, sculptors and architects; the patrons and political forces contributing to this Golden Age of artistic production; and the place of the Spanish golden Age within broader European and global contexts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Women and Art (Formerly 58.340)

Description

Investigation of the various ways women have been portrayed in the visual arts from antiquity to the present. A chronological examination of selected female artists and their milieu from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century.

Medieval Art (Last Term 2005 Fall)(Formerly 58.241)

Description

This course examines the rich cross-cultural artistic heritage of the medieval world from the Late Antique period (third century CE) through the Gothic period (fourteenth century CE). The course includes the study of paintings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, mosaics and architecture. It will explore materials and technique, the relationship of images to sacred texts and rituals, and the controversies regarding image production. Drawing examples for the eastern Mediterranean to the rocky coast of Ireland, the course will draw out the way works of art reflected relationships between the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions.

Contemporary Art and Culture (Formerly 58.352)

Description

Examination of issues of content, theory, and criticism in contemporary art. Current exhibitions and criticism are integral to the course. Topics vary from year to year. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ARHI 2030 History of Art:Preh-Med and ARHI 2040 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod or Studio Art Minor or Art Minor.

Museum Issues (Formerly 58.360)

Description

The art museum in the United States is a unique social institution because of its blend of public and private support and its intricate involvement with artists, art historians, collectors, the art market, and the government. This course will study the art museumÆs history and status in our society today. Special consideration will be given to financial, legal and ethical issues that face art museums in our time. Short papers, oral reports and visits with directors, curators and other museum officials in nearby museums will be included along with a detailed study of a topic of ones choice.

Introduction to Asian American Studies

Description

This course provides students with an overview of the multidisciplinary field of Asian American Studies from two distinct disciplines. The course begins with the history of Asian American Studies and the methods used to advance the field. Next, various aspects of the Asian American experience, such as gender and sexuality, are examined. Students also participate in service learning in partnership with Asian-serving community organizations in and around Lowell, MA. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1010 or 1020 College Writing I or II or (42.103 Col Writing I-Internatl or ENGL 1110 College Writing I ESL) or HONR.1100.

The Criminal Justice System (Formerly 44.101)

Description

This course presents a brief history of the Criminal Justice System and an analysis of its structure and function. This course required of all CJ majors and is a prerequisite for all other courses in criminal justice. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Labor Economics (Formerly 49.302)

Description

An introduction to the economic analysis of behaviors and institutions in the labor market: labor supply and participation, labor demand by firms, wage determination under different institutional settings, and gender, race or ethnicity as determinants of different labor market outcomes. The course presents microeconomic models, empirical findings and their public policy implications on topics such as minimum wage, affirmative action, social insurance programs, workplace safety, and subsidized day care. Prerequisites: 49.201 or instructor's approval. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Quantitative Literacy (QL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ECON.2010 Economics I (Microeconomics).

Contemporary Women Writers (Formerly 42.243)

Description

Contemporary Women Writers introduces students to American women writers of the last fifty years. We examine the historical,socio-cultural, political, and personal influences on these writers' work by studying trends and events in recent American history and themes reflected in the works. By studying contemporary women's writing in this contextualized fashion, students can appreciate larger trends in our society, the role writing plays in examining such trends, and the value of literature as an exploration of human growth and struggle. Through discussion, group collaboration, critical analysis, and by designing their own graphic organizers, students gain a breadth of knowledge in the following areas: the themes and stylistic concerns of contemporary American women writers; the key historical events that influence contemporary American women's writing; the critical reading of literary texts. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Gay & Lesbian Literature (Formerly 42.246)

Description

Explores the treatment of homoeroticism and homosexual love in literature from Antiquity to the present. Emphasis is given to texts reflecting the construction of a homosexual identity and recurring motifs among gay, lesbian, and bisexual writers. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Family in American Literature (Formerly 42.257)

Description

A study of literary selections dealing with traditions of family life, the individual, and social change. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Disability in Literature (Formerly 42.258)

Description

The course will focus on historical and contemporary portrayals of disability and disabled people in literature. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Ethnic Literature (Formerly 42.277)

Description

The course addresses the literature of America's immigrant and cultural groups and how it contributes to defining our national character. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Crime in Literature (Formerly 42.285)

Description

A study of how various authors use crime as a plotting device to study character, reveal social order, and critique social institutions. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Autobiography (Formerly 42.333)

Description

A Study of autobiographical writing from Colonial America to the present. Works from the 17th to the 21st century will allow students to explore the genre of autobiography and related sub-genres, including the captivity narrative, the slave narrative, and the immigration narrative. Readings will also explore literary and political autobiographies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Women Novelists (Formerly 42.335)

Description

A study of selected novels by American women. Focus on the female voice within the American tradition. Treatment of such issues as domesticity, education, and authorship. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Women Writers and the Past (Formerly 42.342)

Description

Women Writers and the Past. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

British Women Novelists (Formerly 42.345)

Description

Selected novels by writers such as Austen, the Brontes, Eliot, Woolf, Bowen, and Drabble. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

African American Drama (Formerly 42.364)

Description

A study of the history and development of African American drama, with emphasis on major aesthetic, political, and social movements in African American culture. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

African-American Literature (Formerly 42.376)

Description

A study of selected works by black American writers, such as Toomer, Wright, Ellison, Walker, and Morrison. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Asian American Literature (Formerly 42.378)

Description

Asian Americans hold an intriguing place in the cultural imagination: as perpetual foreigners, as so-called 'model minorities' that serve to maintain hegemonic power relations, and as living embodiments of America's memory of its involvement in recent wars. As artists, however, Asian Americans have contributed and impressive body of literary work, and we'll examine some of the most enduring and provocative of these texts. We'll explore themes such as trauma and the immigrant experience, issues of exile and dislocation, Asian Americans' embattled place in our country's history, and the intersections of race and ethnicity with gender and sexuality. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Postcolonial Literature (Formerly 42.379)

Description

When the peoples of Africa, India, the Caribbean, Ireland, and Canada finally gained, to a greater and lesser extent, independence from the British during the 20th century, they found that their national, cultural, and individual identities had been radically altered by the experience of colonization. In this course, we will examine how authors have related this postcolonial condition. We will examine a diverse body of texts--poetry which eloquently describe the heroic journey out of colonialism, drama which lays bare the conflicts of assimilation, and novels which fantastically present political struggle--as we determine how postcolonial theory and literature affects and possibly redefines all literature.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Principles of Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Formerly ENTR/64.300)

Description

Course number was formerly 64.300. This course is designed to help non-business students understand the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship in today's global economy and cultivate an entrepreneurial mindset among students in the Manning School of Business entrepreneurship concentration. It will cover different forms of entrepreneurship such as small businesses, growth ventures, corporate entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship. The course will focus on the types of innovation, turning innovation into an ongoing new venture and on the entrepreneurial process. Innovation and entrepreneurship theories and concepts will be discussed with real life examples and cases.

Prerequisites

Requisite: Sophomore level or higher.

Senior Seminar (Formerly 38.418)

Description

This course is specifically designed to enhance the practicum experience in the senior year.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Exercise Physiology Core 3 Courses: HSCI 3060/PSYC 3600 & EXER 4060 & EXER 4080 & EXER 3560 & EXER 3010 & PSYC 2720 and Senior Standing.

Introduction to Gender Studies (Formerly GNDR 240)

Description

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Gender Studies that examines both commonalities and differences among diverse groups of women. A variety of topics are presented such as past and present stratification in work and family, sexual identities, medial representations of women, and violence against women. Social movements for women's equality and feminist theories and methods are also introduced.

Western Civilization I (Formerly 43.105)

Description

This course surveys some important issues and tendencies in the history of Western Civilization from its origins through the early modern period, including ancient Mesopotamia, classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. These include "civilization" and the rise of cities, different imaginings of god(s) and humanity, evolving forms of political organization, continuity and change in social organization and everyday life, and the ongoing dialogue of faith and reason. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

World Civilization I (Formerly 43.107)

Description

This class examines societies and cultures from ancient until early modern times with the underlying assumption that world history is an important conceptual tool for understanding our interdependent world. Course topics analyze the nature of the earliest human communities, the development of the first civilizations and the subsequent emergence of cultures in selected areas of Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas. This course also offers a consideration of issues related to the connections and relationships that shaped civilizations as a result of migration, war, commerce, and the various cultural expressions of self, society, and the cosmos before 1500. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

World Civilization II (Formerly 43.108)

Description

This course will introduce you to the study of world history, its relevance for living in the present, and the challenge to think critically about the emergence and subsequent development of the modern world since 1500. Participants in this course will examine experiences that transcend societal and cultural regions, focus on processes of cross-cultural interaction, and investigate patterns that influenced historical development and continue to impact societies on a global scale. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

United States History to1877 (Formerly 43.111)

Description

This course surveys United States history from the early settlement of North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It considers the role of the political and economic leadership in the building of the nation as well as actions of ordinary people whose energies and aspirations constitute the fabric of United States society. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA)

United States History since 1877

Description

This course surveys the history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. It covers significant developments in the politics, economy, culture, and other aspects of American life during that period. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA)

Native American History (Formerly 43.274)

Description

A comprehensive study of the Native Americans through historical and first-hand accounts of their lives. Designed to enlighten students and to represent fairly the Native Americans, dispelling some of the existing myths about them.

Sub--Saharan Africa (Formerly 43.281)

Description

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the African continent. It will expose students to the processes and patterns that have shaped modern African history. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the continent faces today. But, at the same time, it will also provide students with the knowledge to shatter the myths and stereotypes about Africa.

Global Health (Formerly 30.308)

Description

The focus of this course is on examining health issues from a global perspective including issues related to maternal and child health, aging, infectious diseases, sanitation, and health inequality. Nutritional and environmental health issues in diverse societies are analyzed. Social determinants of health and access to health care in developing and developed countries are emphasized. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Global Marketing (Formerly MKTG 412/62.412/62.303)

Description

Course number was formerly 62.303. Focuses on the marketing aspect of global business. Emphasis is given on cultural dynamics and economics as well as political, social and regulatory constraints as they affect the global marketing practice and strategy implementation. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: MKTG.2010 Marketing Principles.

Musical Practices 2 (Formerly 74.105)

Description

Musical Practices 2 builds upon the basic study of musical elements, vocabularies, and concepts established in Musical Practices 1, extending the exploration of these principles in more depth, with a primary focus on non-western musical traditions and cultural practices.

Introduction to Nursing Practice (Formerly 33.212)

Description

Nursing as a health profession is introduced in this foundation course. The course is organized using functional health patterns. Within the context of the American Nurses Association Standards of Clinical Practice, standards of professional performance are introduced and standards of care are emphasized. Students, at the completion of this course, will demonstrate an understanding of the nursing process and competencies to perform basic nursing interventions in a laboratory and a clinical setting. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Co-req: NURS 2120L Intro to Nursing Prac Lab and NURS 2120R Introduction to Nursing Practice Medication Calcs and sophomore level.

Health Promotion in Nursing (Formerly 33.308)

Description

This course is designed as a transition course for registered nurse students pursuing a baccalaureate degree with a major in nursing. It introduces the theory and research related to the concepts of health/ promotion and risk reduction. These concepts are presented as essential components of professional nursing practice. This course includes a clinical practicum which focuses on the development of interventions to promote the health of individuals and families. This course aims to refine critical thinking skills and analyze nursing's unique contribution to health care. Consideration is given to the interrelationships of theory, research and practice.

Prerequisites

Co-req: NURS.3090 Health Promotion in Nursing Practice Practicum. and Academic Plan Nursing (BS); RN's only.

Community Nutrition (Formerly 36.345)

Description

This course explores the role of the nutrition professional in community needs assessment, intervention development and evaluation, and in forming domestic nutrition policy. Nutrition problems in contemporary communities and of selected target groups in the United States and in developing countries are examined. Programs and strategies to meet nutrition needs outside the acute care setting, such as nutrition education and food assistance are explored. Local, state,and national nutrition policy and initiatives in nutrition will also be examined. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: NUTR 2050 Intro to Nutritional Science and NUTR 2060 Human Nutrition, and Nutritional Science (BS) only.

Introduction to World Religions (Formerly 45.296)

Description

A study of religious knowledge and the phenomena of religion from a philosophical standpoint. The course considers explanations for religious behavior, some central issues in religious belief, and the values and goals of religious systems. Various world religions provide specific data for these topics.

Feminist Theory Politics (Formerly 45.306)

Description

What is sexist oppression? Is our culture still sexist, or is the need for feminism over? How should we respond to sexism in other cultures? Do men and women have different natures? Are our culture's sexual representations of women necessarily degrading, and if so, why? We'll consider these questions, and others, by examining the arguments and methodology of analytic feminism. We'll start by tracing the historical development of feminism in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and then turn to several contemporary feminist analyses of sexist oppression. We'll then use these feminist frameworks to examine more specific issues. Possible topics include: feminist analyses of sexual objectification in pornography, feminist arguments in ethics and social theory, feminist analyses of science,and feminist criticisms of gendered labour. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Philosophy of Race and Gender (Formerly 45.308)

Description

This course will focus on issues of identity and difference. We will discuss the ways in which group identities are formed and break down. We will discuss how differences are constituted and reconstituted. These issues are central to theories of race and gender, racism and sexism. Some of the questions which we will raise are these: What motivates forming group identities? How are they formed? How is identity used within oppressive social structures? How can it be used to transform society? Why do some differences make a difference and others don't? Can we choose our group identities? Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Mysticism: East and West (Formerly 45.340)

Description

This course explores the religious and psychological phenomenon known as the mystical experience, both within the context of organized religion and outside it. We will approach this subject from a comparative standpoint, considering examples from Christianity, Judaism, and Islam and also from Eastern religions such as Buddhism and Taoism. We will make use of philosophy, psychology, theology and literature in order to try to understand mysticism and its relation to religion. Readings include The Upanishads, the Tao Te Ching, the Bible, and Plato. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

World Philosophies (Formerly 45.350)

Description

This course will fuse the historical and the thematic approaches in order to undertake a comparative examination of the relations of the great philosophical traditions (Chinese, Indian, Western, Islamic, and Japanese) to the perennial issues of philosophy. The main focus will be the continuing vitality and heuristic fertility of these traditions and their ability to define how human Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Buddhist and Zen Philosophy (Formerly 45.371)

Description

Explores Buddhist and Zen philosophy and practice from ancient India through its developments in China and Japan to contemporary America. Attention is given to significant philosophical movements such as Abhidharmika, Madhyamika, Yogacara, Huayen, and Chan (Zen).

Philosophy of Sex and Love (Formerly 45.375)

Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to both historical and contemporary discussions surrounding the topics of sex and love. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Philosophy of Peace and Nonviolence (Formerly 45.378)

Description

This course examines philosophical theories of peace, pacifism, and nonviolence. We will study ancient and modern accounts, secular and religious traditions, as well as feminist perspectives in the philosophy of peace and nonviolence. We will explore philosophical applications of nonviolence toward nonhuman animals and the natural environment, along with specific cases of nonviolent resistance in contemporary global conflicts.

Latin American Philosophy

Description

Students in this course will be introduced to current and longstanding debates within Latin American Philosophy. They will also be exposed to many of the principle texts and thinkers within this burgeoning tradition. The class includes a survey of Latin American philosophy ranging from pre-colonial Aztec thought to the debates over the struggle for Latin American independence, and also the question of identity: what constitutes Latin American philosophy.

Introduction to Comparative Political Systems (Formerly 46.112)

Description

A cross-cultural analysis of various governmental systems; elements common to all forms of government are emphasized and variations among contemporary political systems are discussed. Balance between developed and Third World countries. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Introduction to International Relations (Formerly 46.121)

Description

Surveys some recent methods and approaches used in the study of international politics and provides an introduction to current problems of foreign policies of major world powers. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Politics of China (Formerly 46.363)

Description

A study of the recent development of governmental institutions, parties, and ideology in China. Emphasis is placed on the processes of nation-building in the post World War II period.

Latin American Politics (Formerly 46.370)

Description

The context, background and forces shaping the contemporary politics of the Latin American region.

Politics of Pacific Rim (Formerly 46.375)

Description

An examination of the politics, policies and institutions of Japan, the "four tigers" and other countries of the Pacific rim area.

Social Psychology (Formerly 47.209)

Description

Presents an introduction to the study of social behavior in interpersonal relationships, groups, organizations, and the community: Diversity in regard to groups of peoples, cultures, and views is emphasized. Topics include non-verbal communication, social attraction, attitudes and attitude change, group dynamics, prejudice, labeling, stereotyping, interpersonal influence, and applications to social problems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Community Psychology (Formerly 47.255)

Description

Surveys the nature and practice of community psychology, including principles of community organization and change as seen in such areas as education, mental health, the workplace, health care, justice system, corrections and social services. Students may participate in field research or projects in the community, and classroom work will include discussion of the field experiences of the participants. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req or Co-Req: PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science.

Introduction to Sociology (Formerly 48.101)

Description

Serves as the basic course in sociology. Emphasis is directed at the ways in which social institutions such as government, schools, the economy, social class, and the family develop and influence our lives. It is concerned not only with presenting various ways to understand our relationship to society but also with ways to change it. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Directed Studies World Languages Level 4

Description

Directed Studies World Languages Level 4. Permission of the instructor and department chair required.

French 4 and Culture (Formerly 50.212)

Description

This course has French 3 and Culture (or equivalent) as a pre-requisite and is the 4th and last of the 4-course French language program offered at UML. The course strengthens the four skill acquired in prior levels. It emphasizes increased accuracy and depth of students' abilities and knowledge of French and Francophone culture and language in a communicative approach (instruction occurs in French with almost no use of English). Students express themselves orally and in writing at the national standards level of high-intermediate and understand key-concepts when spoken clearly at native speed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 50.211 French 3 and Culture.

French Cinema & Society (Formerly 50.376)

Description

Covers the dramatic presentation French society gives of itself during the period of profound social and economic change, from the New Wave and the May 68 events to today's younger generation facing an uncertain tomorrow. Each screening (in French with subtitles) is preceded by an introduction placing the film in its historical context. In English.

Italian 4 and Culture (Formerly 52.212)

Description

This course has Italian 3 and Culture (or equivalent) as a pre-requisite and is the 4th and last of the 4-course Italian language program offered at UML. The course strengthens the four skill acquired in prior levels. It emphasizes increased accuracy and depth of students' abilities and knowledge of the culture of Italian speaking countries in a communicative approach (instruction occurs in Italian with almost no use of English). Students express themselves orally and in writing at the national standards level of high-intermediate and understand key-concepts when spoken clearly at native speed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req; 52.211 Italian 3 and Culture.

Italian American Literature and Culture (Formerly 52.325)

Description

Discusses the most prominent authors and works of Italian-American Literature as they, by using the ethnic setting, are able to convey universal human concerns and themes. The discussion on Italian-American ethnic issues will include such films as The Godfather, Moonstruck, The Sicilian, Goodfellas, and The Untouchables. Conducted in English.

Italian Women Writers (Formerly 52.330)

Description

Studies women writers of Italy by giving attention to the genres of narrative, poetry, theater and autobiography. Authors are selected according to their impact on issues affecting women, gender studies, feminism, avant-garde, modernism, social relations and psychological discourse. Conducted in English.

Italian Humanism (Formerly 52.373)

Description

A study of the waning of the Middle Ages and the dawning of the Renaissance as seen through the work of Petrarch and Boccaccio. Emphasis is on the study of sources and the influence of Petrarch and Boccaccio upon the literatures of western Europe. Conducted in English.

Italian Cinema and Culture (Formerly 52.378)

Description

A guide to contemporary Italian studies through literary and cultural approaches. The works of central figures in contemporary Italian letters are examined in view of their impact on Italian life. Emphasis is given to poets, novelists, the new cinema, the influences of existentialism, and the impact of America on Italian literature. Conducted in Italian/English.

Portuguese Literature in Translation (Formerly 53.237)

Description

This course offers a broad overview of Portuguese literature, in English translation, from the Middle Ages to the contemporary period, placing literary movements and major authors in their historical and aesthetic context. It focuses on promoting a basic level of cultural literacy about Portugal based on representative reading drawn from the last seven centuries of the country's history situated in their social, cultural and historic contexts. Course assignments lead students to develop skills in textural interpretation, critical thinking, and academic writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Spanish 4 and Culture (Formerly 54.212)

Description

This course has Spanish 3 and Culture (or equivalent) as a pre-requisite and is the 4th and last of the 4-course Spanish language program offered at UML. The course strengthens the four skill acquired in prior levels. It emphasizes increased accuracy and depth of students' abilities and knowledge of the culture of Spanish speaking countries in a communicative approach (instruction occurs in Spanish with almost no use of English). Students express themselves orally and in writing at the national standards level of high-intermediate and understand key-concepts when spoken clearly at native speed.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: WLSP.2110 Spanish 3 and Culture.