All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. If you cannot locate a specific course, try the Advanced Search. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, can be found on the NOW/Student Dashboard or by logging in to SiS.


Engineering for Teachers (Formerly 25.501)

Description

The course will focus on increasing teachers' understanding of the Engineering Design Process. The linkage between science, engineering and technology will be discovered as teachers engage in a variety of home-based projects requiring them to apply design principles to the building, testing and evaluating of prototypes. Teachers will also gain knowledge of the various fields of engineering. Through their participation in the course, teachers will discuss how they might integrate engineering-technology concepts with other areas of their curriculum.

Designing Sustainable Products

Description

The course introduces students to the sustainability aspects of product design. Sustainable products are designed to conserve materials and energy, select low-impact materials, eliminate toxic substances, extend product life, re-use materials, and reduce the generation of wastes. The entire product life cycle will be considered including: material extraction, material processing, manufacturing, transportation, product use, and disposal. Students will learn the impact of design solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context. The students will learn strategies to identify the sustainability impacts throughout the product life cycle, as well as the application of sustainable product design principles and strategies to address these impacts.

Introduction to Nanotechnology (Formerly 25.550)

Description

This course is designed to provide you with a broad overview to the multi-disciplinary field of nanotechnology. The course is team-taught by researchers from science, engineering, health and environment, management, and humanities disciplines. The topics include an introduction to nanoscale phenomena; fundamental theoretical concepts and experimental techniques in nanotechnology; nanoscale manufacturing and processing; innovative nanomaterials for various applications; applications of the technology; and environmental and health impacts of nanotechnology.

Selected Issues in Nanomanfacturing (Formerly 25.570)

Description

A seminar course that examines the issues associated with high rate template-based nanomanufacturing, including: technologies for nanoscale templates, high rate assembly of nanoelements and polymer systems, registration at the nanoscale, interfacing with biological systems, measurement of nanoelements, and molecular modeling. Environmental, regulatory, and ethical issues associated with new technologies are also addressed. The course is co-taught by faculty from Northeastern University, the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and the University of New Hampshire. Meeting dates: January 27, February 10, February 24, March 10, March 24, and April 7. Time: 12:00 to 3:30, including lunch.

Thesis Review (Formerly 25.580)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Project Review (Formerly 25.581)

Description

There is currently no description available for this course.

Graduate Industrial Cooperative Educational Experience I (Formerly 25.590)

Description

Industrial experience credit for co-op and internships with industry. Students must register with department co-op coordinator.

Graduate Industrial Cooperative Educational Experience II (Formerly 25.591)

Description

Industrial experience credit for co-op and internships with industry. Students must register with department co-op coordinator.

Graduate Industrial Cooperative Educational Experience III (Formerly 25.592)

Description

Industrial experience credit for co-op and internships with industry. Students must register with department co-op coordinator.

Graduate Industrial Cooperative Educational Experience (Formerly 25.593)

Description

Industrial experience credit for co-op and internships with industry. Students must register with department co-op coordinator.

Seminar for Teaching Assistants in Engineering

Description

Prepare graduate students for their role as teaching assistants in labs and lectures. Topics include: (1) classroom management, (2) grading strategies, (3) how to prepare for lecture and lab, (4) understanding the cultural differences that come with the diverse campus population, (5) balancing teaching and research responsibilities, (6) how to do graduate-level research. This course is mandatory for all new teaching assistants in the College of Engineering.

Academic and Technical Writing for Research in Engineering

Description

This course addresses the complex nature of academic language and academic writing by focusing on sentence, paragraph and text structures, purposeful and appropriate word choices, and the writing process. Through attention to details and critical reading of various materials, students will enhance their writing skills by applying effective planning, drafting, rewriting and editing strategies. Students will further become adept at critically and creatively evaluating, analyzing, constructing and presenting their ideas and arguments. As a workshop class, the final product of the class will be one or more of (1) a journal paper that is ready for submission, (2) a conference paper, and (3) one or more chapters of a dissertation or thesis. Please Note: Advanced English language proficiency required.

Graduate Professional Development for Engineers

Description

This course is designed to provide master's students with the requisite preparation in understanding the expectations of the workplace and tools needed to engage in an effective job search process. The course will facilitate the transition and preparation to meet the increased expectations of a graduate student while on a graduate cooperative experience. The course will be comprised of a series of workshops and offer resources intended to provide students a good understanding of the US work environment, work culture and expectations. Topics include: workplace culture and expectations, professional communication skills, job search strategies, resume writing, mock interviews, technical writing.

Graduate Cooperative Experience

Description

This one-credit course is for co-op internship experience. There will be one credit whether the co-op experience is for three or six months. Learning objectives a s mutually agreed upon by the student and co-op supervisor will be required to be submitted at the beginning of the experience. A final evaluation by supervisor will be due before final grading. Full-time co-op is typically expected to be at a minimum of 30 hours per week.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGN.6020 Grad Prof Development for Engineers. Full-time MS-level student in Engineering having successfully completed at least 18 graduate credits in their major that count toward the completion of the associated master's degree program.

Workforce Development

Description

Optional seminar series which will be comprised of weekly speakers from industry, government, academia and non-profit sectors with a focus on workforce development talks.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGN.6020 Grad Prof Development for Engineers. Full-time MS-level student in Engineering having successfully completed at least 18 graduate credits in their major that count toward the completion of the associated master's degree program.