Project Examples

A Water System Design for Muchipampa

Course: 22.342 - Convective Processes
Semester: Fall 2005
Instructor: Eugene E. Niemi, Jr
Partner: Village of Muchipampa, Peru

Brief Description:

A Water System Design for Muchipampa project was focused upon the design of a water delivery system to provide 1 gallon per minute from a spring fed source to each of six homes spread over a distance of 500 meters in Muchipampa, Peru. Muchipampa is a community that has about six families living in drought conditions for the past year. The village people have pleaded for UML S-L to put in a water supply system.

Full Description:

A Water System Design for Muchipampa project was focused upon the design of a water delivery system to provide 1 gallon per minute from a spring fed source to each of six homes spread over a distance of 500 meters in Muchipampa, Peru. Muchipampa is a community that has about six families living in drought conditions for the past year. The village people have pleaded for UML S-L to put in a water supply system. There is a spring that has a flow rate of roughly one gallon per minute. There is a hill about 300 meters from the spring upon which a water storage tank of 1100 liters was planned for placement.

One of the student-designed systems was installed in Peru during Dr. John Duffy’s recent June 2006 trip to the village. This implemented project served to provide a water supply to homes normally living in drought conditions. Deliverables for the Peruvian community now include an installed water supply system consisting of a pump, storage tank, piping, and control valves. The Muchipampa community also participated in community-based discussions and decisions as to the best location for installing the water system. Course objectives met by this s-l project included design project in piping system design. Students and faculty also expressed an appreciation for a chance to work on a real world project that helps people, rather than a “paper design” only.

Students worked in teams to meet project and course objectives. A water pump was identified and selected to deliver water. Objectives of the design were to meet requirements while minimizing total system cost (piping, tank, and pump, combined). Since the pump was planned to be solar powered, minimizing electrical costs was not considered as critical as would ordinarily be the case in such a design process. Student teams were required to identify: piping system length; pipe diameter and material; number of elbows, tees, valves, unions, etc.; head loss in system and total head delivered by the pump; pump specifications (manufacturer model number, output, power required, etc.); and cost of material and equipment.

Students worked in teams of six students each and self selected group members, as well as a group leader. The group leader was then responsible for overall coordination of the project, calling meetings of the group, etc. At the end of the project, all group members were required to analyze performances of each group member involved, including themselves, on a written evaluation sheet. Projects were finalized in a formal report with all design specifications, calculations and or discussions to support choices made, catalog or vendor data as required, and computer design of the final design. Design iterations were also included in appendices. The final design was installed in the Peruvian village.

Learning objectives met by the S-L project were for students to:

  • Experience the design process, including the opportunity to apply theory and tools of convective processes to an actual system, and opportunity to help a remote village
  • Estimate losses (friction loss factor), optimal diameter of pipes, pipe selection, maximum pressure in pipes, and loss in different joint or connections such as elbows and valves
  • Write and present technical information reports

Community objectives met by the S-L project:

  • Enhanced health and quality of life for a remote village in Peru