Tzu Yang Yu

Tzu Yang Yu, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Wind Turbine Research Group

Tzu Yang Yu, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Wind Turbine Research Group

Assistant Professor
Phone:
978-934-2288
Fax:
978-934-3052
Office:
Falmouth 107C

Expertise

Radar NDE, Structural Engineering, Concrete Materials, Structural Stability & Dielectric Dispersion of Materials

Research Interest

• Dielectric modeling of multi-phase cementitious composites
Tomographic reconstruction using inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) measurements
• Numerical modeling of wave propagation and scattering using finite difference time domain (FDTD) methods
• Early-age hydration behavior of cementitious composites
• Nondestructive testing (NDT) of concrete structures using far-field electromagnetic waves
• Structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructures using distributed sensing systems
• Mechanical analysis of concrete structures using finite element methods (FEM)
• Non-stationary signal processing using wavelet transform (WT)
• Geographic information systems (GIS) of civil infrastructures
• Structural rehabilitation/strengthening of deteriorated civil infrastructures using externally bonded composite materials

Educational Background

B.S., National Yunlin University of Science and Technology

M.S., National Central University 

M.Eng., M.I.T. 

Ph.D., M.I.T.

Biosketch

Dr. Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. He received his Ph.D. from M.I.T., majoring in structural engineering, radar NDE of concrete structures, signal processing, and electromagnetic modeling of construction materials. He is a recipient of the 2008 ASNT Fellowship Award and 2010 Fellow of the JSPS in Tokyo, Japan. He is interested in mechanics, theorecial and applied mathematics, structural stability, macro- and micro- structures/behaviors of cementitious composites, electromagnetic properties of construction and metamaterials, and SHM of civil infrastructure. His research is currently supported by the NIST, UMass S&T Office, the U.S. DOT, and AFRL.