University of Massachusetts Lowell

Areas of Study

Accreditation

The University of Massachusetts Lowell is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).NASAD is the national accrediting agency for art and design and art and design-related disciplines. The Association also provides information to the public. It produces statistical research, provides professional development for leaders of art and design schools, and engages in policy analysis.

For more information please visit: http://nasad.arts-accredit.org.

Art Major

UML offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in art with a concentration in either Design or Fine Arts with emphasis in: animation, painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography, graphic design, web design, and interactive-media.

The Art Major at UMass Lowell is designed to develop the artistic and aesthetic talents of students through a Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program that meets the National Association of Schools of Art and Design accreditation requirements. The Art Department also offers a minor program in studio art.

Art Minor

In addition to the Art Major, UML students can choose from two art minors: the Art/Art Studies, General Minor (SA), which is designed for students who focus on photo, animation, design or general art studies; and the Art Minor (AR), which is designed for students who focus on painting and sculpture.

  1. 1. Art/Art Studies, General Minor (SA)
  2. 2. Art Minor (AR)


BFA Requirements

General Education Requirement
A minimum of 33-35 credits must be completed as part of the University General Education requirement.

BFA studies in Art consist of 87 credit hours and must include at least five courses (15 credits hours) at the 300 level, including the following distribution requirements:

  1. 1. Six Studio Foundation courses (18 credits): Art Concepts I, Art Concepts II, Digital Foundations,
  2. Form and Content, Drawing I, and Drawing II must be completed prior to starting the concentration.
  3. 2. Fourteen Concentration courses (42 credits).
  4. 3. Internship (3 credits).
  5. 4. Four courses (12 credits) in Art History and two courses (6 credits) in Aesthetics and Critical Studies.
  6. 5. Senior Studio Requirement (6 credits): Last semester of senior year.

Courses

A strong foundation program is essential to the education of today’s artists and designers. At the University of Massachusetts Lowell, the foundations program reflects the interdisciplinary nature of contemporary art and design practices. Art is understood as a critical part of visual culture. Foundations students gain visual awareness and vocabulary through a six-course sequence. The acquisition of technical skills and techniques is always accompanied by concept development and critical analysis. Students get immersed in artistic life, just as one needs to be immersed in a foreign country in order to learn a foreign language. Risk taking is strongly emphasized while students begin developing their own voice and artist identity.

The following Studio Foundation Courses are required by all art majors. You need: 6 courses /18 credit hours

Required Courses Course Number Pre-Requisites
Art Concepts I 70-101  
Art Concepts II 70-102 70.101 Art Concepts I
Digital Foundations 70-113  
Drawing I 70-155  
Drawing II 70-156 70.101 Art Concepts I, and 70.155 Drawing I
Form and Content   70-201 70.101 Art Concepts I, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.113 Digital Foundations

Concentration: ART

Concentration: DESIGN

Course Offerings Course Number Course Offerings Course Number
Ceramics 70-232 Graphic Design I 70-210
Sculpture I 70-235 Web Design I 70-220
The Language of Video 70-242 Typography I 70-230
Monotypes 70-257 Digital Imaging and Photography 70-262
Papermaking 70-259 Computer Art I 70-265
Photography I 70-261 2D Animation I 70-272
Alternative Photo Processes 70-266 Interactive Media I 70-278
Printmaking 70-267 Illustration 70-290
Color 70-269 Graphic Design II 70-310
Figure Drawing 70-270 Web Design II 70-320
Painting I 70-271 Typography II 70-330
Water Media 70-273 3D Animation I 70-376
Book Arts 70-298 2D Animation II 70-377
Ceramics II 70-332 Interactive Media II 70-381
Sculpture II 70-335 Streaming Media for the Web 70-385
Sonic Arts 70-345 Advertising Design 70-395
Photography II 70-361 Art and Copy 70-397
Painting II 70-371 Graphic Design III 70-410
Professional Studio Photography 70-373 Web Design III 70-420
Ceramics III 70-432 Advanced Studio 70-491
Sculpture III 70-435 Directed Studies 70-494
Photography III 70-461 Advanced Tutorial 70-495
Painting III 70-471    
Advanced Studio 70-491    
Directed Studies 70-494    
Advanced Tutorial 70-495    
Course Offerings Course Number Pre-Requisites
Typography I   70-230 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Typography II   70-330 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, and 70.230 Typography I, and 70.210 Graphic Design I
Papermaking 70-259 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Photography I   70-261 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Digital Imaging and Photography   70-262 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II, and Co-req: 70.265 Computer Art I.
Computer Art I 70-265 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Printmaking   70-267 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Color 70-269 70.101, 70.102, 70.201, 70.255 and 70.355.
Painting I   70-271 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Water Media   70-273 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Sculpture I 70-235 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Ceramics 70-232  
Graphic Design I   70-210 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Book Arts 70-298 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Ceramics II 70-332 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II, 70.232 Ceramics I, or Instructor's Permission
Sonic Arts 70-345 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Sculpture II 70-335 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and 70.235 Sculpture 1, or Permission of Instructor.
Photography II   70-361 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and 70.261 Photography I, or Permission of Instructor.
Computer Art II   70-268 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and 70.265 Computer Art I.
Monotypes   70-257 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II
Figure Drawing 70-270 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Painting II 70-371 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and 70.271 Painting I or Permission of Instructor.
Professional Studio Photography   70-373 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.261 Photography I, and 70.361 Photography II
The Language of Video   70-242 70.113 Digital Foundations,71.101 Art Concepts I (studio), 71.102 Art Concepts II, and 71.201 Form & Content.
Web Design I 70-220 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I, 70.310 Graphic Design II, and 70.230 Typography I
Streaming Media for the Web   70-385 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, and 70.220 Web Design I
Interactive Media I   70-278 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.
Graphic Design II   70-310 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, and 70.230 Typography I, and 70.210 Graphic Design I
Advertising Design   70-395 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I and 70.310 Graphic Design II.
Art and Copy   70-397 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I and 70.310 Graphic Design II.
Ceramics III 70-432 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II, 70.232 Ceramics I, and 70.332 Ceramics II.
Photography III   70-461 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.261 Photography I, and 70.361 Photography II.
Painting III   70-471 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.271 Painting I and 70.371 Painting II.
Sculpture III 70-435 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II, 7.0235 Sculpture I and 70.335 Sculpture II.
Graphic Design III   70-410 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I, 70.310 Graphic Design II, 70.230 Typography l and 70.330 Typography ll.
Alternative Photo Processing   70-266 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and 70.261 Photography I, or Permission of Instructor.
Advanced Studio   70-491 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and Junior level studio class in the same discipline.
Directed Studies   70-494 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and Sophomore level studio class in the same discipline.
Illustration   70-290 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, and 70.156 Drawing II.
Web Design II 70-320 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I, 70.310 Graphic Design II, 70.230 Typography I and 70.220 Web Design I.
3D Animation I   70-376 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.272 2-D Animation and 70.276 Intro to 3-D Modeling.
2D Animation II   70-377 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, 2D Animation 70-377, or Instructor permission.
Interactive Media II   70-381 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.272 2-D Animation and
70.276 Intro to 3-D Modeling
Web Design III 70-420 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II, 70.210 Graphic Design I, 70.310 Graphic Design II, 70.230 Typography,70.220 Web Design I,& 70.320 Web Design II.
Advanced Tutorial   70-495 70.101 Art Concepts, 70.102 Art Concepts II, 70.113 Digital Foundations, 70.201 Form & Content, 70.155 Drawing I, 70.156 Drawing II and Junior level studio class in the same discipline
2D Animation I   70-272 70.101, 70.102, 70.113, 70.201, 70.155, and 70.156, or Instructor permission.

Students need to take four courses (12 credits) in Art History and two courses (6 credits) in Aesthetics and Critical Studies.

Course Offerings Course Number Pre-Requisites
History of Art I (Prehistoric to Medieval Art)   58-203  
History of Art II (Renaissance to Modern)   58-204  
Aesthetics and Critical Studies of 20th Century Art   79-221 Pre-Reqs: 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies, Art in Political, Religious, and Historical Context   79-241 Pre-Reqs: 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies of Contemporary Art and Culture   79-352 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
History Photography Studio   79-225 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies Seminar   79-231 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies of Graphic Design   79-360 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies of New Media   79-361 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Understanding Movies: Cinema as Social Commentary   79-380 42.102 College Writing II, This is a 300 level course intended for Junior and Seniors.
Aesthetics and Critical Studies Seminar   79-490 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Directed Study in Aesthetic Concepts   79-494 Pre-Reqs: 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.
Practicum Experience in Aesthetic Concepts   79-496 58.203 History of Art:Preh-Med and 58.204 Hist of Art II: Ren-Mod.

Internship

70.221 Internship required: 3 Credit Hours

Students are encouraged to secure an internship that is relevant to their concentration and will help them launch their careers in art or design. For additional information, please visit the Art Department’s Internship wiki.

Senior Studio Content

Senior Studio Seminar is the BFA degree capstone course and can only be taken in the last semester of a student's course sequence. There is a portfolio requirement for Senior Studio. Students who have completed 105 BFA applicable credit hours are eligible to apply for Senior Studio.

An exhibition of work completed in Senior Studio is required in the student's final semester. A minimum grade of C+ (2.3 GPA) is required to pass Senior Studio. Students who receive a grade below C+ (2.3 GPA) must repeat the course.

The Senior Studio Seminar course is regarded as a professional course and for this reason it is restricted to matriculating BFA majors only and may not be credited to any other major. Students should be aware that transferring from the BFA program to another degree major will normally entail a loss of credits and the completion of degree requirements within the customary four-year period may not be possible.

 Denotes that course description includes viewable sample art.

Art Concepts I will focus on learning the visual language of the creative process through an examination of the principles of two-dimensional visual organization. These fundamental basics form the underlying structure of all studio and communication arts. Through slide lecture, guest lecturers, field trips, and studio projects, students will begin to understand the many forms that visual expression takes. The course will develop creative problem solving skills and students will learn to respond to personal challenge. Students will also be instructed in the principles of professional execution and be introduced to diverse modes of thought, media, and aesthetic expression. Art majors only.

>> Sample Lesson

Art Concepts II will focus on learning the visual language of the creative process through an examination of the principles of three-dimensional visual organization. These fundamental basics form the underlying structure of architecture, environmental graphic design, product design and sculpture. Through slide lecture, guest lecturers, field trips, and studio projects, students will begin to understand the many forms that three-dimensional expression takes. The course will develop creative problem solving skills and students will learn to respond to personal challenge. Students will also be instructed in the principles of professional execution and be introduced to diverse modes of thought, media, and aesthetic expression. Art majors only.

>> Sample Lesson

This course explores the computer as a tool of the visual language. Topics included are raster and vector-based image making, art for the internet & mobile devices, and current image capture and output methods. This course will introduce Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and a basic programming with the aim of expanding the artist's toolkit. Lectures, readings, and discussions will provide an overview of history and contemporary ideas on the use of computers in art.

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This required foundation course focuses on the translation of the three-dimensional world to the two-dimensional surface. Through a variety of media, surfaces, and approaches, students will concentrate on developing visual literacy and visualization skills. A wide range of assignments will be given to develop graphic and conceptual forms of expression.

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Drawing II will ask the student to continue to develop their skills in observation and will emphasize giving form to contemporary ideas through building a strong sense of visual literary. Assignments include a wide range of color media, surface, and subject matter with the focus on the psychological and structural use of color, creative experimentation, and the development of personal style.

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Form and Content is considered the capstone course of the Art Foundations Requirement. Form and Content will continue to focus on learning the visual language of the creative process by exploring the possibilities of time-based and sequential media. Through a variety of studio assignments and individual projects students will explore the integration of humanities concepts related to contemporary art and culture. Art majors only.

The study of lettering concepts and techniques, including the history of letters, styles and families of type, letter design, hand-drawn to computer-based lettering approaches and their effect and uses in communication. Emphasis will be on creative and aesthetic communication. Fall, alternate years.

This course will be a continuation in the study of typography with an emphasis on exploring the relationship between images, words and text. Students will further their understanding of hierarchy typographic voice, style, legibility and rhythm. Projects will involve both two-dimensional and three-dimensional media. At the end of this course, students will regard the power and beauty of type and “visual” voice with a deeper understanding and appreciation.

The papermaking course is designed to explore paper, not just as a surface to receive an image, but also as a material capable of being an artistic expression in and of itself. The course will explore the processes and techniques of making images in handmade paper, making images on handmade paper, making visual designs out of handmade paper and casting handmade paper into three-dimensional sculptural forms.

>> Sample Lesson

Photography I covers the basic camera and darkroom techniques as well as aesthetic principles. Emphasis will be on black and white film and paper emulsions. Students learn to develop and print their own photographs.

This course will offer the student a transition between traditional photographic imaging and digital photographic imaging. The course will cover the fundamentals of digital scanning, digital capture and image manipulation. Image preparation for other media will also be explored. Basic familiarity with the Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required.

An aesthetics and communications course using the computer as the primary tool for translating art ideas into physical form. The emphasis will be on practical usages of existing Macintosh software as a means of creation.

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An introduction to basic printmaking processes and aesthetics with the emphasis on etching. The approach is concept oriented, emphasizing experimentation and exploration on an individual level to communicate ideas. Fall.

Designed to focus on advanced projects using the Macintosh platform. Focus is on design, layout, animation and video.

A course in the systematic study of color and color theory to sharpen visual acuity, stimulate creativity and develop a greater facility in the use of color.

>> Sample Lesson

Presents oil painting techniques as vehicles for serious creative expression. A variety of assignments will be given to help the student build proficiency in the use of color, paint handling, and subject matter.

This course will provide students with the fundamental understanding about the process and the concepts in animation for narrative and experimental expression. Preproduction including scripting and storyboarding will be especially emphasized. Hybrid techniques in both traditional and digital animations including hand-drawing, stop-motion, rotoscoping, pixilation as well as tweening will be introduced. Static and kinetic aesthetics of moving images will be explored through the review of historic and contemporary animations, and through the production. Students from this course will make a much smoother transition to 3D animation courses, Language of Video, Interactive media as well as Web Design/Art. The course will also introduce the student to historical and contemporary perspectives related to the discipline.

This course will cover the technical and creative uses of water based media as they apply to fine arts and graphic design. Assignments in acrylic, gouache, watercolor, and ink are designed to stimulate independent thinking.

The exploration of three-dimensional form through the use of basic materials, methods and approaches. Assignments will include expressive problems based on human and non-objective form relationships. Spring.

>> Sample Lesson

Introduces the student to the basic hand-building techniques, wheel throwing, and ceramic sculpture. The course will also examine clay, the material, glaze techniques, and firing processes.

>> Sample Lesson

This course provides students with a variety of experiences involving skills and techniques including computer use related to the execution of illustrations for children's books, fashion drawings, record albums, book jackets, folders, posters, and magazines. Field trips, discussions related to job opportunities and preparation of portfolios are integral parts of the instruction. Fall.

Exercises, lectures and projects will introduce students to graphic design principles and techniques. Course will begin with a fundamental study of image, form, and space relations, then cover such topics as working with grids, typography basics, page layout, the introduction of color, rendering techniques, history, and more. Students will be assigned a series of projects to enhance their visual communication skills.

Study of studio problems in visual structures and organization with various media and techniques; contemporary practices and issues will be explored. Topics will vary. This course may be repeated.

Students will be assigned a variety of advanced-level projects dealing with areas such as logo design, publication design, interactive screen design, direct mail projects, corporate identity systems, poster design, and more. Projects in this class are designed to better develop the students' ability to take a project to its final stage and render it as a professional portfolio piece.

This advanced-level course is designed for students who have completed Website Development (90.238) and Website Design (70.379). The course will cover advanced topics such as user-centered design, information architecture, testing, and usage analysis. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their design, development, and conceptualization skills.

>> Sample Lesson

Building on Ceramics I as an introductory course, Ceramics II will ask the student to explore functional and nonfunctional ceramic form. Students will be expected to challenge themselves with scale, advanced glaze methods and they will become familiar with kiln firings. Historical and contemporary issues in ceramics will be covered through lectures, slide presentations and critiques.

>> Sample Lesson

Sonic Arts is an introductory course to hardware hacking for sculptural installation, audio composition and instrument invention. Assignments will include building piezo microphones, home-made speakers, exploring pickups used in performance and amplification of sculptural objects, manipulating tape head readers and building simple oscillation circuits for noise. Students will learn about electronics and soldering, including how to hack devices for audio and sculptural experiences and experiment with sound as an inspiration for sculpture and performance art.

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A course allowing the student to further develop his or her techniques and understanding of sculptural form, leading to a more personal vocabulary. Conventional techniques will be extended to cover more contemporary materials and methods. Spring, alternate years.

>> Sample Lesson

Photography II is an advanced course in black and white photography that includes instruction in technique and vision. Emphasis will be on the development of a cohesive body of work in photography.

Computer Art II will continue to expose the student to advanced computer art methods that focus on design, layout, and digital imaging.

Monotypes will explore the one-of-a-kind “painter's print.” Emphasis will be on the development of personal expression through a variety of assignments and techniques. Three portfolios of prints are required, two with assigned topics, and one with a self-assigned theme.

Figure drawing is the study of the draped and undraped figure from life, stressing both sound observation and the creative use of human form as a vehicle for personal expression. A variety of assignments, graphic media, and approaches will be given in order to help explore both philosophical and aesthetic issues.

>> Sample Lesson

Designed to allow students to develop individual style and approach to content through a series of self-initiated paintings. Students will work closely with the instructor to develop a cohesive series that has a sound philosophical and aesthetic basis. Spring, alternate years.

>> Sample Lesson

This course will provide students with the fundamental understanding about the process and the concepts in animation for narrative and experimental expression. Preproduction including scripting and storyboarding will be especially emphasized. Hybrid techniques in both traditional and digital animations including hand-drawing, stop-motion, rotoscoping, pixilation as well as tweening will be introduced. Static and kinetic aesthetics of moving images will be explored through the review of historic and contemporary animations, and through the production. Students from this course will make a much smoother transition to 3D animation courses, Language of Video, Interactive media as well as Web Design/Art. The course will also introduce the student to historical and contemporary perspectives related to the discipline.

This is a professional level course in advertising product photography and studio portrait photography. Students will learn view camera techniques as well as principles of lighting using strobe equipment.

An introductory course in video camera principles and editing functions. Utilizing writing and still photography, students will explore the language of video in both images and sound as they produce factual documents and/or personal fiction.

Students will learn the fundamentals of computer generated 3D modeling and animation. The emphasis will be on narrative, story telling, sequential content.

This advanced-level course is designed for students who have completed 3D Modeling and Animation and are interested in further exploring the narrative possibilities of animation. Conceptual drawings and story boarding will be required. The course will cover advanced sequencing, motion paths, editing, audio, and virtual environments. Other course topics will include media preparation for output to film, video, and CD/DVD.

This course will introduce the student to the processes of game conceptualization and game prototyping. Immersive and interactive media will be explored. Interactive, engaging game design will be emphasized. Conceptual drawings, storyboarding, 3D modeling and multimedia authoring will be employed. Proficiency in 3D model building and familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required.

This course will focus on the creation of visual content for the web and will explore what constitutes a visually exciting and engaging site. Other topics that will be covered are: file formats, compression, web color strategies, and platform standards. Basic familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required.

>> Sample Lesson

This advanced level course is designed for students who have completed Interactive Media I and are interested in continuing to develop their skills in interactive design media.

This will be an intermediate course focused on the best practices of the Web Design industry, and will give students a deeper footing in the professional practice of Web Design.

>> Sample Lesson

This is an advanced course for those with intermediate or advanced ability in World Wide Web technology who want to explore the use of continuous feed, streaming audio, video, and 3D virtual worlds. The course will examine current technologies with special attention to emerging protocols and standards for audio and video publishing. Basic familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required.

This course will introduce the student to the processes of game conceptualization and game prototyping. Immersive and interactive media will be explored. Interactive, engaging game design will be emphasized. Conceptual drawings, storyboarding, 3D modeling and multimedia authoring will be employed. Proficiency in 3D model building and familiarity with Mac OS and/or Windows platforms required.

Web Art & Design III is an advanced course for students interested in Flash animation, ActionScript, php, and how databases function for blogging, making web-based art and digital performance.

>> Sample Lesson

This course provides students with a variety of experiences involving skills and techniques in both hand manipulated media and computer tools related to the execution of illustrations for children's books, fashion drawings, book jackets, folders, posters, and magazines.

Graphic Design II is an intermediate level class in graphic design dedicated to the continued development of powerful visual graphic communication, and presentation skills. Students will further their understanding of the interdependency between words and image.

Instruction in lettering, layout of commercial media as well as in the creative aspects of advertising is an integral part of the course. Practical problems, field trips, and technical guidance from preliminary layouts to finished work will help prepare students for the commercial art field. Spring.

The real world of advertising incorporates selling words and memorable images in a dynamic visual/verbal design unit. As copywriters and art directors, students learn to think pictures and see words as they prepare advertising campaign concepts for a variety of products and media, including print and television.

In a world of increasing manipulation, documentary photographs still astound us with their visual truths. In this course, students will utilize words and images "the primary tools of the photojournalist " to explore the significant issues of our time. Works by Fenton, O'Sullivan, Gardner, Riis, Hine, Bourke-White, Lange, Smith, Davidson, Salgado, Mark and others are studied for content, style, and inspiration. Fall, alternate years.

Ceramics III will require students to develop a personal visual voice in clay, resulting in a focused coherent body of work. Students will be expected to develop productive studio habits, continue to explore advanced glaze methods and participate in kiln firings.

>> Sample Lesson

Sculpture III is an advanced course allowing the student to further develop their understanding of contemporary sculptural form, leading to a more personal vocabulary. Advanced materials and methods including public art will be investigated. Contemporary cultural content will be emphasized. Students will continue to define their individual visual voice in sculpture.

This upper level course will function as a combination portfolio class and studio workshop. Part of the course will be devoted to improving one's portfolio with attention to further understanding the dynamic relationships between content, form and context. Projects will stimulate imagination and innovation as students explore integrative approaches to design challenges and improve their unique visual voices. Students will also look at the power of visual communication with social responsibility in a rapidly changing and complex world.

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Painting III is a course that will allow students to develop individual style and approach to content through a series of self-initiated paintings. Students will work closely with the instructor to develop a cohesive series that has a sound philosophical and aesthetic basis.

Sculpture III is an advanced course allowing the student to further develop their understanding of contemporary sculptural form, leading to a more personal vocabulary. Advanced materials and methods including public art will be investigated. Contemporary cultural content will be emphasized. Students will continue to define their individual visual voice in sculpture.

>> Sample Lesson

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In order to enable students to expand expression in areas of their choice, they may repeat any studio course that is the most advanced offered in that given subject. They will be given more freedom within assignments and be expected to perform on a more advanced level.

This is an advanced graphic design class with an emphasis on developing strong visual concepts. Students will work on complex projects. Projects will provide the opportunity for discussion concerning professional business practices, design ethics and pre-press. Finished work will be portfolio quality.

In order to enable students to expand expression in areas of their choice, they may repeat any studio course that is the most advanced offered in that given subject. They will be given more freedom within assignments and be expected to perform at a more advanced level.

A special problem in studio art is investigated through regular faculty meetings and independent studio work.

A program of directed studies which affords the advanced students an opportunity to pursue a previously explored problem in greater depth. The purpose is to sharpen and refine skill, content and presentation.

A study of American and European movements in painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1900 to the present. Emphasis is placed on Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism, International Style, Pop, Op Art, Minimal Art, Photorealism, and Post-Modernism.

The course Aesthetics and Critical Studies of Photography is a survey and analysis of the history of photography that concentrates on the aesthetic development of the medium from a scientific discovery to an artist’s tool. European as well as American photographers will be studied ranging from Talbot, Nadar and Cameron to today’s contemporary masters.

This course studies cultural and artistic production for political, religious and social educational, inspirational, and doctrinal aims.

The objectives are to study the production of meaning in paintings and frescos, sculpture, stained glass, architecture and other art forms that were commissioned through the church and state patronage system; to analyze how these images are used to represent and define social order; how these images support the patron's interpretation of history while appealing to aesthetic needs; and ways in which art supported the educational and evangelical aims of church and state. The course will introduce students to the visual and critical language of art produced at this time and analyze works in the context of contemporary history. The thematic focus of this class is designed for Italian cultural studies. No knowledge of Italian is required.

There will be 3 comparative case studies derived from material and locations on site.

Examination of issues of content, theory, and criticism in contemporary and traditional art and culture. Topics vary.

Examination of the aesthetic theories and practice of graphic design. Significant practitioners of the art will be highlighted.

Examination of the aesthetic theories and practice of new media. Significant practitioners of the art will be highlighted.

This course will be a study and examination of the aesthetic theories and practice of illustration. The work of master illustrators will be examined.

This film theory seminar has several main objectives: to study the production of meaning in films; to analyze how moving images are used in social representation; and to introduce students to the visual and critical language of cinema. In this course, we will view a series of films by international authors. These address some of the most pressing issues of today's global world such as identity, subjectivity, difference and otherness, race relations, representations of gender and sexuality, immigration, war, colonialism and post-colonialism, poverty, and social inequalities. The films that we watch will be studied not as isolated cinematic texts but as illustrations and examples of theories of representation. Students will develop their critical analysis skills by being introduced to theoretical concepts such as ""the gaze"" in art and cinema as well as formal elements such as mise-in-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound.

This course will be an advanced study and examination of particular aesthetic concepts. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department. Topics vary.

A special problem in studio art is investigated through conferences and studio work.

A program of on-campus and/or off-campus experiences for art majors only. Specific requirements will vary depending upon department policies and the nature of the program undertaken by the student. The intent of the practicum experience is to provide an occasion for investigation of a community, social, cultural or artistic area and for applying techniques of problem solving and/or credits. Students will be graded ""satisfactory"" or ""unsatisfactory"". Fall and Spring.