Course Listing Technology Society and Human Values

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

40.248 Values in American Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 1248
Status Active

Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists. Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

41.490 Legal Aspects of Cyberspace Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5002
Status Active

The growth of the Internet has created two parallel universes each with its own set of rules and reality: real space and cyber space. Traditional notions about privacy, defamation, contracts, freedom of expression, pornography, stalking, jurisdiction and intellectual property are challenged by the latest cyberspace technology. Much of the debate about control, which leads to questions about rights and responsibilities, centers around who, if anyone, should design the architecture of cyberspace, i.e., the "code". These and other topical subjects serve as the focus on the study of legal issues in cyberspace.

42.216 Monsters, Apes & Nightmares Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5033
Status Active

This course examines literary responses to science in England and the United States from the early Nineteenth Century to the present. Readings include novels--Frankenstein, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Jurassic Park--essays, and poems.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.233 Play Analysis Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36436
Status Active

An introduction to the principles of play construction and the vocabulary and methods of interpreting play texts for theatrical production. Required of all theatre arts concentrators.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101 College Writing I; Pre-Req: 42.102 College Writing II.

42.236 Science Fiction and Fantasy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5051
Status Active

Designed to introduce students to understand science fiction and fantasy within the broader context of literature and literary theory. It attempts to develop and hone student's skills of critical analysis as it supplies them with the tools to contextualize their reading experience - i.e., to understand the origins and politics of the books that they read.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.248 Values in American Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 1248
Status Active

Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists. Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists.

42.249 Literature on Technology and Human Values Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5060
Status Active

A study of the relationship between works of fiction, cultural attitudes toward technology, and social values.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

43.304 European Economic & Social History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5260
Status Active

Europe has been transformed in the last 250 years from an agricultural society to a post-industrial one. We study the processes by which this happened, from the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and early 19th century to the wars and depressions of the early 20th century and the collapse of the communist system and European unification in the late 20th century. Students learn basic concepts and methods of history and economics.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Level: minimum Sophomore standing.

43.380 Work and Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5323
Status Active

Provides a survey of labor history from the colonial period to the present focusing on the interrelationship between culture and work in American society and on the dynamics of technical and economic changes on the organization of work processes.

44.203 Technology and the Criminal Justice System Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30356
Status Active

This course is designed to introduce students to the latest innovations in the applications of new technological advances in the criminal justice system. Topic areas include an examination of the new technology of crime commission, and the corresponding new technology of crime control strategies. Our focus will be on the application of both "hard" technology (e.g. equipment, hardware, devices, etc.) and "soft" technology (e.g. computer software programs, information systems, classification devices, and other problem-solving applications) in each of the following areas: crime prevention, police, courts, institutional corrections, community corrections and the private sector.

45.337 Science & Meaning of Nature Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5544
Status Active

The Scientific Revolution in seventeenth century Europe transformed our relationship to the world. This class analyzes the meaning of this transformation, inquiring into such questions as what defines science as a unique discipline, whether science and religion are intrinsically in conflict, and whether the lesson of science is that the universe is merely the result of impersonal laws and blind chance, or whether there is a place for meaning and purpose in the world.

45.366 Globalization and Its Critics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35076
Status Active

The course explores globalization as the process of transformation of regional and national phenomena into global ones, analyzing its social, economic, political, and cultural aspects. Supporters view it as the progress of liberalization and democratization that develop peaceful international cooperation; critics see globalization as the expansion of the profit-seeking global corporations that abuse the less developed and vulnerable regions. The course readings include the works of Amartya Sen, Samuel Huntington, Joseph Stiglitz, and other leading economists, sociologists, and philosophers.

46.210 Media & Politics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5583
Status Active

This course explores the role of the media in American politics and the role of politics in the American media including a survey of general approaches to media analysis and the history of mass communication.

46.222 Politics of the Internet Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5588
Status Active

This course will examine the influence social media and web connectivity have had on political campaigns, campaign fundraising, political mobilization, and the recent proliferation of democratic movements.

46.251 Politics of Identity Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30848
Status Active

This interdisciplinary course considers the way we construct self-identity through our affiliation with various cultural and political groups- from the"Red Sox nation" to linguistic, economic, nationalistic and ethnic groups. It examines the central role of nationalism; its symbols, traditions and expectations; the role of the media; and the benefits and risks of our allegiance to these groups.

46.316 Politics and Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5615
Status Active

Analysis of the role of film in creating, expressing, revealing, and responding to social and political ideas and values. Examines a variety of film and film styles and introduces students to elements of film theory, the theory of popular culture and the role of film in forming our ideas about the world.

47.273 Brain, Mind & Behavior Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5712
Status Active

Surveys issues and topics dealing with the physiological and evolutionary bases of behavior. Biological systems and processes that influence behavior are considered, with particular emphasis on brain mechanisms. Recent discoveries in the neurosciences will be presented. Methods of research are reviewed.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 47.101 General Psychology.

48.215 Peacemaking Alternatives Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5821
Status Active

Examines various positive alternatives to war and violence, including disarmament, nonviolence, conflict resolution, and the United Nations. Students do volunteer work with an activist agency or interview an activist. The course stresses the historical and contemporary role of peace movements and allied social-change movements such as feminism, civil rights and environmentalism.

48.311 Sociological Perspectives on Communication and Social Change (Last Term 2009 Fall) Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33285
Status Active

Most social interactions and interventions involve communication. Thus, communication patterns present critical issues for sociological inquiry. This course introduces communication as a central yet often ignored element of social life. It surveys existing communication theories, then focuses on models used by marginalized populations in efforts to democratize communication systems. Finally, it introduces tools for communication strategizing. As a final product students will conduct a frame analysis of a current social topic. From a general liberal arts perspective, the course will stress critical thinking and writing skills.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 48.101 Intro to Sociology.

57.211 Sustainable Development Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6134
Status Active

This course examines workplace and regional factors that shape the prospects for sustainable prosperity and worker and community empowerment. The course begins by reviewing recent trends in the distribution of income and wealth and the industrial structure of the New England economy. The historical dynamics shaping work organization and regional development are examined. Several industry case studies are selected because of their importance to the regional and national economy. The case studies provide focus for studying the strategic choices made by firms in mature industries and newly emerging regions; the basis of competitive advantage for Japanese firms and the response of American rivals; and the influence of the product cycle and regional institutions on capture or retention of emerging and mature industries. The final section of the course focuses on the prospects for sustainability of the organization of production and its environmental impact, incentives for skill development and technological innovation, and shared prosperity. A central course objective is to foster an understanding of the links between the workplace and region in the pursuit of sustainable development and shared prosperity.

58.203 History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6221
Status Active

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Medeival period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from Ancient Egypt and Near East, Antiquity, Byzantine and Medeival, and Early Renassance Europe. Methodological problems of interpretation, formal analysis and aesthetic principles are studies in these art works.

58.204 History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6222
Status Active

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance times to the Modern period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from the Renaisance, Baroque, Rococo, Nineteenth Century Movements-Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism and Abstract Art. The aim of the coure is to introduce the student to basic critical and art historical methods as well as the analysis of style and content within sequential cultural contexts.

58.206 History of Architecture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6224
Status Active

A survey of the major technical and stylistic developments in ecclesiastical and secular architecture from Prehistory to the present day studied with an emphasis on the major monuments (Parthenon, Pantheon, Gothic Cathedrals, St. Peter's, Versailles Palace, Eiffel Tower, Guggenheim Museum). Spring, alternate years.

58.225 History of Picturing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6227
Status Active

This course surveys the major trends and functions of imaging and picturing, as well as its societal impact as it becomes a pervasive cultural and aesthetic entity since the invention of photograph, film and video. Lectures trace the chronological development of the medium; analyze images, culture and integrate discussions pertaining to the role of imaging as it affects the process of visual information as well as how imaging and picturing can affirm existing cultural structures or shape the course of new aesthetic images and ideas.

59.101 Values and Creative Thinking Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6257
Status Active

Values and Creative Thinking is a course designed specifically for freshmen. Throughout the semester you will be asked to examine your personal value system and how it relates to your education. The purpose of this course is to help you identify those individual qualities that you can use to achieve your highest academic potential. Specifically, this course is intended to help you develop greater self-awareness and confidence; creative and critical thinking skills; career planning skills designed to help you understand the full spectrum of available careers; an understanding of different computer technologies and multimedia techniques; an awareness of the role of values in determining your experiences and perspectives; problem solving and group decision making skills relating to issues that affect the quality of your life.

59.203 History of Art I: Prehistoric to Medieval Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6221
Status Active

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture and architecture from prehistoric times to the Medeival period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from Ancient Egypt and Near East, Antiquity, Byzantine and Medeival, and Early Renassance Europe. Methodological problems of interpretation, formal analysis and aesthetic principles are studies in these art works.

59.204 History of Art II: Renaissance to Modern Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6222
Status Active

A survey of the origins and development of painting, sculpture, and architecture from Renaissance times to the Modern period. Emphasis is placed on representative works of art from the Renaisance, Baroque, Rococo, Nineteenth Century Movements-Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Cubism, Dadaism, Surrealism and Abstract Art. The aim of the coure is to introduce the student to basic critical and art historical methods as well as the analysis of style and content within sequential cultural contexts.

59.225 History of Picturing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6227
Status Active

This course surveys the major trends and functions of imaging and picturing, as well as its societal impact as it becomes a pervasive cultural and aesthetic entity since the invention of photograph, film and video. Lectures trace the chronological development of the medium; analyze images, culture and integrate discussions pertaining to the role of imaging as it affects the process of visual information as well as how imaging and picturing can affirm existing cultural structures or shape the course of new aesthetic images and ideas.

59.248 Values in American Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 1248
Status Active

Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists. Deals with the development and interrelationship of American views on individualism, nature, science, technology, democracy, ethnicity, and the American dream. Readings begin with the Puritans and end with contemporary essayists.

59.303 Society and Technology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6281
Status Active

How safe is safe enough? Who really was Dr. Frankenstein? Was it possible not to create the A bomb? In this course we study decision-making capabilities crucial to survival in a technological age and examine the many value issues involved in understanding the nature of technological risk and its impact on modern society. Focusing on questions of scientific responsibility and societal safety, this course examines the changing attitudes toward technology and values.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Level Junior Standing.

59.315 Islamic Culture and Contemporary Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6292
Status Active

This course examines the relationship between Islam, politics and culture in the contemporary Muslim world. This course will introduce students to the emergence and spread of Islam and the place the 'Muslim brotherhood' holds in the imagination of many Muslims. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the social, political and cultural complexity of the Muslim world. We will cover such regions as the Middle East, Africa, South and Southeast Asia as well as various places in the 'western' world. Topics will include the rise of political Islam, the various cultural expressions of Muslims, and the variation and divergences across Muslim cultures. **This course could be taken by students from a variety of departments/majors: Islamic Studies, Political Science, History, Asian Studies, Cultural Studies,a nd Liberal Arts

70.100 Artbotics Credits: 4

Course Details
Min Credits 4
Max Credits 4
Course ID 33786
Status Active

This course is designed for students in a variety of majors to explore the intersection between Art and Computer Science, especially Robotics, through community-based public exhibitions and service-learning experience. In this project-driven class, you will learn founding principles in both the fields of Art and Computer Science, and put them into practice by creating interactive, tangible exhibits that are displayed in public settings. The knowledge and experience gained during the class will be further deepened by the service learning experience of mentoring high school students in the community. The course will also include guest lectures from practitioners in Art and Computer Science.

70.113 Digital Foundations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35096
Status Active

This course explores the computer as a tool of the visual language. Topics included are raster and vector-based image making, art for the internet & mobile devices, and current image capture and output methods. This course will introduce Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash and a basic programming with the aim of expanding the artist's toolkit. Lectures, readings, and discussions will provide an overview of history and contemporary ideas on the use of computers in art.

73.212 Special Topics: Sound Thinking Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35114
Status Active

Special Topics: Sound Thinking is an interdisciplinary elective for sophomore-level undergraduates that explores issues of sound production, musical form, or music in multimedia, depending on faculty and student interest. It is co-taught by Music and Computer Science faculty.

78.301 Music, Technology and Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 7387
Status Active

Examines how recording technology has changed music and the relationships of music and society. The course studies and evaluates the application of technology to making music, to music listening, to styles of music, and to music's roles in society, other art forms, and media. The evolving importance of technology in music over the past century is charted through the study of musical examples and through viewing how human values are reflected in this century's timely music. Studies will be based on assigned readings, lectures and discussions, examination of current and historically significant music recordings, motion pictures and media pieces for this artistry, their use of available technology, and their impact on human values and society.