Course Listing Gender Studies

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

40.270 Women in American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5238
Status Active

This course surveys the history of women in the British North American colonies and United States with a special focus on social and economic change. It examines women as a distinct group but also attends to divisions among them, particularly those based on class, ethnicity/race, and regional diversity. Course themes include concepts of womanhood, the development and transgression of gender roles, unpaid work and wage labor, social reform and women's rights activism, as well as changing ideas and practices with respect to the female body.

41.376 Family Law Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 4983
Status Active

Studies the critical family law issues facing society today. Subject matter examined includes the law of marriage, custody, adoption, divorce, child support, juveniles, right to die, fetal tissue transfer to prolong the life of another, reproduction control, and surrogate parenting. This course is taught from a legal and human values perspective.

41.381 Women and the Law Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 4985
Status Active

Presents issues that particularly affect women. Topics include: sex discrimination, sexual harassment, marriage, divorce, reproductive control, surrogate motherhood, and custody.

42.240 Literature and Women Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5053
Status Active

A survey of literary attitudes toward women from the Judaic and Hellenic periods through the present.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.243 Contemporary Women Writers Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5056
Status Active

Contemporary Women Writers introduces students to American women writers of the last fifty years. We examine the historical,socio-cultural, political, and personal influences on these writers' work by studying trends and events in recent American history and themes reflected in the works. By studying contemporary women's writing in this contextualized fashion, students can appreciate larger trends in our society, the role writing plays in examining such trends, and the value of literature as an exploration of human growth and struggle. Through discussion, group collaboration, critical analysis, and by designing their own graphic organizers, students gain a breadth of knowledge in the following areas: the themes and stylistic concerns of contemporary American women writers; the key historical events that influence contemporary American women's writing; the critical reading of literary texts.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.257 The Family in American Literature Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5065
Status Active

A study of literary selections dealing with traditions of family life, the individual, and social change.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.328 Writing About Women Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30862
Status Active

Writing About Women

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II and 42.227 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or 42.229 Essay Writing or 42.238 Intro to Creative Writing.

42.335 American Women Novelists Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5119
Status Active

A study of selected novels by American women. Focus on the female voice within the American tradition. Treatment of such issues as domesticity, education, and authorship.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.342 Women Writers and the Past Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30861
Status Active

Women Writers and the Past

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101 College Writing I; Pre-Req: 42.102 College Writing II.

42.345 British Women Novelists Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5121
Status Active

Selected novels by writers such as Austen, the Brontes, Eliot, Woolf, Bowen, and Drabble.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.395 Special Topics in English Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38096
Status Active

This course focuses on the exploration of thematic or issue-oriented or timely topics of interest. The precise topics and methods of each section will vary. Barring duplication of topic, the course may be repeated for credit.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101 College Writing I; Pre-Req: 42.102 College Writing II.

43.207 Women in China Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5204
Status Active

From Confucian texts to current conditions, the course examines the evolution of Chinese women's status throughout the centuries. The course will ask questions such as whether Confucianism dictated oppression against women, what factors influenced the changes of status for women, how Western feminism is connected with Chinese women, what roles women played in transforming China, and how ordinary women lived and are still living in China.

43.228 Women in European History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5215
Status Active

This course examines the history of women in late medieval, early modern, and modern Western Europe (ca. 1300-1900). From medieval saints and Renaissance queens to Enlightenment Salonieres and ordinary wives and mothers, women have played an astonishing variety of roles. We will utilize primary and secondary sources, historical films, and works of art to understand the contributions and challenges of women in the past.

43.270 Women in American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5238
Status Active

This course surveys the history of women in the British North American colonies and United States with a special focus on social and economic change. It examines women as a distinct group but also attends to divisions among them, particularly those based on class, ethnicity/race, and regional diversity. Course themes include concepts of womanhood, the development and transgression of gender roles, unpaid work and wage labor, social reform and women's rights activism, as well as changing ideas and practices with respect to the female body.

43.301 The World of Things: Consumer Cultures in the Modern West Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5257
Status Active

This course will examine the emergence and historical impact of consumer cultures in the modern West, from the eighteenth century through the present. Topics to be covered will include the emergence of spaces of consumption (the home, the commercial/spectacular metropolis, the department store, the shopping mall, the tourist site), changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, the construction of modern social identities of class, gender, generation and race through consumption, and political struggles over consumption.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.338 War and Memory in Twentieth Century France Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37041
Status Active

This course will address the individual and collective trauma of modern warfare, as that was experienced in France both during and after the country's three main wars in the twentieth century. It focuses on how the experience of modern war was negotiated in culture---in personal and official memory, in gender relations, and in a great variety of written and visual texts. Individual units will be dedicated to World War I, the Occupation and Vichy Regime during World War II, and the Algerian War, and to the long and conflicted afterlife of those conflicts.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.380 Work and Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5323
Status Active

Provides a survey of labor history from the colonial period to the present focusing on the interrelationship between culture and work in American society and on the dynamics of technical and economic changes on the organization of work processes.

44.360 Gender, Race, and Crime Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5390
Status Active

This course examines gender and racial implications of criminal laws, criminal justice practices and programs will be examined. The position of women and racial/ethnic minorities will be assessed from the different perspectives of victims, offenders, and criminal justice practitioners.

44.422 Victimology Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5413
Status Active

This course examines the patterns of victimization, the characteristics and lifestyles of crime victims, and the impact of their victimizations. The treatment of victims by the criminal justice system will be examined along with possible reforms in these approaches.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 44.101 Criminal Justice System or 44.221 Criminology I, Junior/Senior standing only.

44.477 Intimate Partner Violence Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5417
Status Active

This course examines the causes and consequences of domestic violence and the latest research regarding the responses of the criminal justice system.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Level is Junior or Senior standing.

45.306 Feminist Theory Politics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5515
Status Active

What is sexist oppression? Is our culture still sexist, or is the need for feminism over? How should we respond to sexism in other cultures? Do men and women have different natures? Are our culture's sexual representations of women necessarily degrading, and if so, why? We'll consider these questions, and others, by examining the arguments and methodology of analytic feminism. We'll start by tracing the historical development of feminism in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, and then turn to several contemporary feminist analyses of sexist oppression. We'll then use these feminist frameworks to examine more specific issues. Possible topics include: feminist analyses of sexual objectification in pornography, feminist arguments in ethics and social theory, feminist analyses of science,and feminist criticisms of gendered labour.

45.375 Philosophy of Sex and Love Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5509
Status Active

The aim of this course is to introduce students to both historical and contemporary discussions surrounding the topics of sex and love.

46.320 Gender Law and Politics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5617
Status Active

Explores legal constructions of gender by examining Supreme Court cases, federal legislation, historical documents, news stories, and scholarly essays on sexual inequality in the United States. Topics include the evolution of the family as a legal (and illegal) reality; political regulation of reproduction and sexual activity; feminist critiques of economic inequality; the rise and fall of affirmative action; the changing role of gender in class consolidation; and ongoing debates about the relationships between public and private life.

46.327 The Dynamics of Sexual Politics Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5621
Status Active

Starting with the constructionist approach of analyzing the sexual dynamics of ancient civilizations, we will expose how sex has been used as a political tool to further the cause of unrelated agendas, how attitudes about sex have changed from Greco-Roman times to the 1960's sexual revolution, culminating in the current political debate about Vermont's civil union laws. Join us in this academic endeavor to understand our roles as sexual beings both in history and in politics, as well as an exploration of our own attitudes towards differing sexualities.

46.402 Women in Islam Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5674
Status Active

Focusing upon one of the most important topics in Islam, this course will go beyond conventional stereotypes and explore woman's many and varied roles within Islamic cultures and societies.

46.411 Dynamics Power and Authority Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6189
Status Active

This course surveys theories of power, authority, participation, and politics. Building on these theories, students will examine changing social, political, and economic patterns of inequality based on class, race (and related divisions of ethnicity, religion, caste, nationality), and gender. Reviews various approaches to altering these dynamics (business strategy, public policy, community and social movements). Cuts across units of firm, community, region, and nation, along with corresponding governmental institutions, and links theoretical analysis with study of practical problem solving. Instructor-initiated cases drawn from a variety of national experiences. Students will learn techniques of power analysis and prepare a power analysis project.

47.335 Psychology and Women Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5723
Status Active

Considers such topics as: the psychology of sex differences; biological bases of psychological sex differences; the nature of female sexuality; clinical theory and practice concerning women; women as mental patients and mental health consumers; implications for psychology and for women's status.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 47.101 General Psychology.

47.351 Human Sexuality Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5725
Status Active

Addresses the biological, psychosocial, and attitudinal aspects of human sexuality through lectures, discussions, films from a variety of perspectives.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 47.101 General Psychology.

48.225 Sociology of Disability Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33256
Status Active

This course is organized around several key questions that are used to study the concepts of disability and ability from a variety of sociological and interdisciplinary perspectives. Specifically, the course explores representations of disability in popular culture and medical discourses to discuss disability and ability as social constructs. By looking at various literary and cultural representations, this course investigates constructions of the disabled and abled body, how this becomes politicized, and the implications of these constructions.

48.231 Sociology of the Family Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5824
Status Active

Studies the nature of the family in contemporary society, with particular emphasis on the family in America. What functions does the family perform in modern society? How is it changing? How do these changes affect our lives?

48.240 Sociology of Gender Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5827
Status Active

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of gender studies. A variety of topics are presented, such as gender stratification, work and family, sexual identities, media representations of women and men, women's movement, and violence against women. Feminist theories and methods are also introduced.

48.305 Sociology of Family Law Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5841
Status Active

Examines some social issues in family law, the changes therein, and the social climate and consequences accompanying these. By using the sociological method of inquiry to examine family law cases, the relationship between law and society as instruments of order and change are exemplified.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 48.101 Intro to Sociology.

48.362 Social Welfare Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30414
Status Active

The course examines the development of social welfare policy in the United States as well as alternative strategies for social welfare provision. Particular attention is paid to the role of race/ethnicity, class, and gender in the formation of social welfare policy.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 48.101 Intro to Sociology.

48.405 Feminist Methodologies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34784
Status Active

Despite the recent growth of feminist methodologies, there is no one way of doing feminist methodologies. The growing body of literature in this area addresses the distinctive challenges and strengths of doing this research. Gender Studies scholars especially seek to question the framing of a study, managing of emotions, and ethical dilemmas. We will explore feminist strategies for creating, implementing, and analyzing a project that is grounded in the everyday lives of people while situating them in a social, political, and economic context. We will explore the interdisciplinary intersections where these challenges push at the boundaries of the disciplines of your major field of study. We will also investigate how to use as variety of qualitative approaches while doing a feminist project and the ways in which feminism can enlighten understandings of "traditional" qualitative methods.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Academic Plan Sociology (BA) only, or Instructor permission.

52.330 Italian Women Writers Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6018
Status Active

Studies women writers of Italy by giving attention to the genres of narrative, poetry, theater and autobiography. Authors are selected according to their impact on issues affecting women, gender studies, feminism, avant-garde, modernism, social relations and psychological discourse. Conducted in English.

57.420 Gender, Work and Public Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33616
Status Active

This seminar course, "Gender, Work and Public Policy" will explore the relationship between human rights, gender and work issues in the 21st century. We will examine how current and future reality can be shaped by related public policies. Today we live in a period of global transition comparable to the period that followed the Industrial Revolution. It presents us with enormous challenges and opportunities regarding factors we will address in class: economic globalization, government restructuring, work-family balancing, environmental safety at work, gender inequalities and the connection between human rights and dignity at work. We will especially look at public policies that can either impede or advance better overall equality of work-life and family life.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Senior Status.

58.340 Women and Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6241
Status Active

Investigation of the various ways women have been portrayed in the visual arts from antiquity to the present. A chronological examination of selected female artists and their milieu from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century.

58.345 Pre-Raphaelite Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6242
Status Active

The examination of nineteenth century painting in England with a study on the role of representative artists such as Ford Madox Brown, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, Edward Burne-Jones, William Holman Hunt, Elizabeth Siddall, Fredrick Sandys, and William Morris.

59.340 Women and Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6241
Status Active

Investigation of the various ways women have been portrayed in the visual arts from antiquity to the present. A chronological examination of selected female artists and their milieu from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century.

59.345 Pre-Raphaelite Art Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6242
Status Active

The examination of nineteenth century painting in England with a study on the role of representative artists such as Ford Madox Brown, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, Edward Burne-Jones, William Holman Hunt, Elizabeth Siddall, Fredrick Sandys, and William Morris.

79.380 Understanding Movies: Cinema as Social Commentary Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37494
Status Active

This film theory seminar has several main objectives: to study the production of meaning in films; to analyze how moving images are used in social representation; and to introduce students to the visual and critical language of cinema. In this course, we will view a series of films by international authors. These address some of the most pressing issues of today's global world such as identity, subjectivity, difference and otherness, race relations, representations of gender and sexuality, immigration, war, colonialism and post-colonialism, poverty, and social inequalities. The films that we watch will be studied not as isolated cinematic texts but as illustrations and examples of theories of representation. Students will develop their critical analysis skills by being introduced to theoretical concepts such as "the gaze" in art and cinema as well as formal elements such as mise-in-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 42.102 College Writing II, This is a 300 level course intended for Junior and Seniors.

GNDR.200 Special Topics in Gender Studies (200-level) Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36387
Status Active

"Special Topics in Gender Studies" (200-level) offers students the opportunity to study a topic of special interest in the field of Gender Studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. The content and approach will vary depending upon the research and teaching interests of the faculty member teaching the course.

GNDR.240 Introduction to Gender Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36625
Status Active

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the field of Gender Studies that examines both commonalities and differences among diverse groups of women. A variety of topics are presented such as past and present stratification in work and family, sexual identities, medial representations of women, and violence against women. Social movements for women's equality and feminist theories and methods are also introduced.

GNDR.300 Special Topics in Gender Studies (300-level) Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36388
Status Active

"Special Topics in Gender Studies" (300-level) offers students the opportunity to engage in depth with a special topic in the field of Gender Studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. The content and approach will vary depending upon the research and teaching interests of the faculty member teaching the course.

GNDR.301 Gay and Lesbian Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36389
Status Active

This seminar provides an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of lesbian, gay, bisexual. and transgender (LGBT) studies, incorporating perspectives from the sciences, social sciences and humanities. The general goal of the course is for students to explore the dynamic, interactive forces - biological, psychological, social, cultural, and political - that shape the experience of sexuality. Topics will include: methodological, epistemological and pedagogical issues in the study of sexuality; the biological foundations of gender and sexuality; the social construction of sex and gender; literary, artistic, and mass media representations of LGBT people; development of gender and sexual identities; relationships and families; LGBT communities and political movements; HIV/AIDS; intersecting identities (gender, race, class, disability, etc.), and queer theory.

GNDR.401 Gender Studies Practicum Credits: 1-3

Course Details
Min Credits 1
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36397
Status Active

This course provides a link between the UMASS Lowell campus and the community, offering students a unique learning experience. This Community Service-Learning course provides opportunities for students to learn through thoughtful engagement in community service, applying knowledge of gender issues gained in the classroom to the world outside the classroom. Students and their faculty supervisors together will determine the kind of service work students will engage in during the semester, choosing from a wide range of available placements. They will be using their hard-won knowledge from their years in the classroom and applying it to help meet urgent needs in the he community. Students will have the opportunity to make lasting connections and effect positive change in our community. Ideally, this course will promote good citizenship through reflection on gender issues and testing of personal values, leading students toward a heightened sense of social responsibility and a lifelong commitment to their local, national, and global communities.

GNDR.410 Directed Studies (400-level) Credits: 1-3

Course Details
Min Credits 1
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36243
Status Active

This course, taken for 1 or 3 credits, may serve as a capstone experience for advanced gender studies students, helping them to explore a gender-related topic of interest while working closely with a faculty member. Projects that students complete for the Directed Studies will vary in length, scope, and topic, depending on how many credits are taken and which faculty member the student agrees to work with the student. What all projects will have in common is (1) a topic clearly relevant to gender studies, (2) an emphasis on achieving deep learning through advanced study, and (3) the integration of two or more distinct disciplines, integrating these disciplinary insights in order to solve a complex problem or analyze a complicated issue. This course allows for a student and professor to work closely together on a project of mutual interest. It is expected that the faculty member will be supporting and guiding the student�s work, and thus regular meetings will be necessary. In some cases the faculty member may not feel competent to oversee all aspects of a project in which an unfamiliar discipline is employed. In such cases, a second (and even third) faculty member may be asked to participate in the Directed Study as a consultant and final reader.

GNDR.490 Seminar in Gender Studies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36398
Status Active

This course serves as a capstone experience for advanced students, helping them to make connections between the gender studies classes they have taken and their main course of study or some other area of interest. This seminar provides a framework for students to integrate what they have learned, thus moving their experience in the program from a multi--perspectival examination of gender to a more cohesive and integrated approach encapsulated in a final project. This project will draw upon the methods, knowledge theory, end products, etc. of at least two distinct disciplines, integrating these disciplinary insights in order to solve a complex problem or analyze a complicated issue related to gender. Students will benefit from working with peers in small groups and as a whole class, learning how other students synthesize what they have learned about gender issues and how their lived experience influences their perspectives on such things as the intersection of gender with socio-economic position, race and ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, and other factors. The professor who leads this seminar will be both a resource and a catalyst; students will learn about gender and advanced research, and they will be prompted to reach their academic potential.

HON.320 Seminar: Special Topics in Honors Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 36909
Status Active

Seminar: Special Topics in Honors offers students the opportunity to engage in depth with a subject that is of special interest in an Honors-level seminar. The course will address an inquiry-based topic that spans or falls outside the boundaries of any individual major on campus, but integrates methodology, content, and /or approaches from two or more.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: Honors Program or permission of the instructor.