Course Listing Film Studies

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

41.372 Sports, Entertainment and Art Law Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 4981
Status Active

The purpose of this course is to challenge students to engage in analytic reading, critical thinking and problem solving as it relates to the legal issues facing the sports, entertainment and art worlds.

41.386 Intellectual Property Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 4988
Status Active

Surveys the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction between the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights.

41.489 Seminar in Law Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5001
Status Active

Provides opportunity for small groups of advanced students to study selected topics.

42.232 Turning Fiction into Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5048
Status Active

Often when we encounter narratives (in the movies or in books) we tend to practice a "suspension of disbelief" letting the story unfold, following the conventions of film and fiction without question This course will direct our critical focus on the mechanisms through whic writers and filmmakers convey meaning to their audiences.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

42.341 Studies in Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 31938
Status Active

A rigorous examination of a topic of current interests in film studies organized by particular themes, genres or filmmakers.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 42.101/102 College Writing I & II.

43.348 Making an Historical Documentary Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34782
Status Active

This course provides students with the basic conceptual and technical skills for developing and completing an historical documentary, including instruction about subject choice, narrative structure, camera work, and editing.

43.389 Ancient History in Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37439
Status Active

Ancient History in Film seeks understand the interconnection between ancient texts, social history and pop culture in American cinema. This course is more than an excuse to watch fun films and gain academic credit. It will engage the primary texts that are the foundation for these cinematic creations while investigating the social and cultural influences that shaped the making of these movies. Ultimately, this course will provide a clearer view of our own world through the lens of moviemakers mimicking the Greco-Roman world. We will read primary texts in translation, modern analyses of these movies and you are responsible to watch an entire film between class sessions. All films are on reserve in the Media Center of the O'Leary Library.

45.314 Philosophy of the Gothic Imagination Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5522
Status Active

A philosophical inquiry into science fiction, fantasy, and horror, with special emphasis on film. This course will attept to provide interpretations of some classic examples from these genres, as well as to inquire into the philosophical significance of these literary categories and their relation to mythology and religion. Questions to be addressed will include the problem of knowledge and rationality and its limits, the nature of the human being, and the moral problem of the role of violence in the social order. The class will attempt to identify a continuous tradition between these modern genres and ancient Greek tragedy and mythology.

45.316 Philosophy and Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5524
Status Active

This course examines the political and philosophical values and ideas which constitute cinema. It analyzes film as an historical, cultural, commercial, and artistic endeavor. Students will develop the skills to watch film actively and critically.

46.316 Politics and Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5615
Status Active

Analysis of the role of film in creating, expressing, revealing, and responding to social and political ideas and values. Examines a variety of film and film styles and introduces students to elements of film theory, the theory of popular culture and the role of film in forming our ideas about the world.

48.112 Sociology Goes to the Movies Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33538
Status Active

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to survey primary sociological texts and view films, offer commentary on and analysis of social behavior.

50.340 Contemporary French Cinema Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5968
Status Active

Provides a critical appreciation of contemporary French cinema (1985-today) aiming at sorting out its eclecticism and focusing on the following aspects: 1) French cultural exception in the European Union: cultural integration and national identity; 2) Representation of the ongoing social and moral changes in contemporary France; 3) The new generation of French filmmakers. Class taught in French.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 50.211 French 3 and Culture, or 50.212 French 4 and Culture.

50.376 French Cinema & Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5973
Status Active

Covers the dramatic presentation French society gives of itself during the period of profound social and economic change, from the New Wave and the May 68 events to today's younger generation facing an uncertain tomorrow. Each screening (in French with subtitles) is preceded by an introduction placing the film in its historical context. In English.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 50.211 French 3 and Culture, or 50.212 French 4 and Culture.

50.380 Francophone Identity through Cinema Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5975
Status Active

Provides a critical appreciation of the notion of Francophone identity through modern and contemporary (1970-today) Francophone cinema from diverse places such as but not limited to North Africa, West Africa (especially Senegal), Canada (especially Quebec) the Caribbean, Belgium, and Switzerland. The course is aiming at showing the evolution of the Francophone identity in the postcolonial period until now and is focusing on the following aspects: 1) The emergence and importance of postcolonial Francophone cinema in the 1970s as a "cinema engage" (especially Sembene Ousmane in Senegal); 2) Contemporary issues of the postcolonial Francophone societies through films; 3) Representations of the cultural diversity in Francophone films; 4) Identity, race and immigration, women's status issues.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 50.211 French 3 and Culture, or 50.212 French 4 and Culture.

52.378 Italian Cinema and Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6025
Status Active

A guide to contemporary Italian studies through literary and cultural approaches. The works of central figures in contemporary Italian letters are examined in view of their impact on Italian life. Emphasis is given to poets, novelists, the new cinema, the influences of existentialism, and the impact of America on Italian literature. Conducted in Italian/English.

54.371 Hispanic Literature & Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6090
Status Active

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Reqs: 54. 211 Spanish 3 and Culture or 54.212 Spanish 4 and Culture.

54.375 Latin American and Spanish Cinema Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6092
Status Active

An exploration of representative Spanish and latin American films from a variety of major directors. Areas of investigation include the cinematic representation of nationality, ethnicity, identity, gender, history and politics. This course will be taught in English. Knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not required. Spanish majors and minors will complete written assignments, reviews, quizzes, and exams in Spanish.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 54.102 Spanish 2 and Culture, or 54.204 Intensive Spanish 3 and 4.

58.225 History of Picturing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6227
Status Active

This course surveys the major trends and functions of imaging and picturing, as well as its societal impact as it becomes a pervasive cultural and aesthetic entity since the invention of photograph, film and video. Lectures trace the chronological development of the medium; analyze images, culture and integrate discussions pertaining to the role of imaging as it affects the process of visual information as well as how imaging and picturing can affirm existing cultural structures or shape the course of new aesthetic images and ideas.

58.370 Art History and Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6247
Status Active

Examination of issues of content, theory and criticism in the traditional, modern and contemporary lives of artists; autobiographies, biographies and historiographies as source of filmic expression. Focus on the interpretation and transformation of art historical records into filmic vision as revealed in set and costume design, music, camera technique and other aesthetic elements of film, as well as how such elements function to extend and convey directorial vision to movements in art history.

59.225 History of Picturing Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 6227
Status Active

This course surveys the major trends and functions of imaging and picturing, as well as its societal impact as it becomes a pervasive cultural and aesthetic entity since the invention of photograph, film and video. Lectures trace the chronological development of the medium; analyze images, culture and integrate discussions pertaining to the role of imaging as it affects the process of visual information as well as how imaging and picturing can affirm existing cultural structures or shape the course of new aesthetic images and ideas.

74.456 Film Music Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35562
Status Active

A study of music in sound cinema from the 1920s to the present. The course focuses on the expressive, formal, and semiotic function that film music serves, either as sound experienced by the characters, as another layer of commentary to be heard only by the viewer, and/or some mixture of the two. Composers to be studied include Max Steiner, Bernard Hermann, Jerry Goldsmith, John Williams, Danny Elfman, and others, as well as film scores that rely upon a range of musical styles, including classical, popular, and non-Western. The singularly most important goal of the course will be to study how music functions in a given film, regardless of its musical style. In the process, ancillary ideas will emerge including discovering how music establishes psychological moods, guides emotions, and reveals aspects of the narrative structure of the film. By the end of the course, the student will have gained a greater understanding of both music and film and it is likely that students will never watch or listen another movie in quite the same way.

79.380 Understanding Movies: Cinema as Social Commentary Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37494
Status Active

This film theory seminar has several main objectives: to study the production of meaning in films; to analyze how moving images are used in social representation; and to introduce students to the visual and critical language of cinema. In this course, we will view a series of films by international authors. These address some of the most pressing issues of today's global world such as identity, subjectivity, difference and otherness, race relations, representations of gender and sexuality, immigration, war, colonialism and post-colonialism, poverty, and social inequalities. The films that we watch will be studied not as isolated cinematic texts but as illustrations and examples of theories of representation. Students will develop their critical analysis skills by being introduced to theoretical concepts such as "the gaze" in art and cinema as well as formal elements such as mise-in-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 42.102 College Writing II, This is a 300 level course intended for Junior and Seniors.