History

All courses, arranged by program, are listed in the catalog. Courses designated as “active” have been offered in the past three years. Courses designated as “inactive” have not been offered in the past three years and indicate the semester in which the course was last offered. If you cannot locate a specific course, try our advanced search link. Current class schedules, with posted days and times, may be found on the Registrar's Office website or by logging directly into iSiS.

43.101 Classical Civilization Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5189
Status Active

This course provides an introduction to the Ancient Near East, Greece and Rome. The class first examines the formation of urban centers and the evolution of civilization as the late Bronze Age world transforms into the Iron Age with the creation of the vast empires such as Assyria and Achaemenid Persia. The course then focuses on the development of Greek city-states and the ideological differences between Athens and Sparta with a brief exploration of Classical Greed culture. Finally the class looks at the conquests of Alexander and his successors in the East, and the development of Rome as it shaped and was shaped by the cultures it conquered. The course requires short analytical papers, exams, and historical analysis of primary sources.

43.105 Western Civilization I Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5191
Status Active

This course surveys some important issues and tendencies in the history of Western Civilization from its origins through the early modern period, including ancient Mesopotamia, classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. These include "civilization" and the rise of cities, different imaginings of god(s) and humanity, evolving forms of political organization, continuity and change in social organization and everyday life, and the ongoing dialogue of faith and reason.

43.106 The Modern World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5192
Status Active

In a period of intensifying globalization a basic understanding of our world is increasingly important. The main purpose of this course is to expose students to the global processes that have shaped our modern world since roughly the year 1500. Taking on a global and comparative perspective, this course will help students to develop a topical, chronological, and geographical understanding of global history and cultures.

43.107 World Civilization I Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5193
Status Active

This class examines societies and cultures from ancient until early modern times with the underlying assumption that world history is an important conceptual tool for understanding our interdependent world. Course topics analyze the nature of the earliest human communities, the development of the first civilizations and the subsequent emergence of cultures in selected areas of Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas. This course also offers a consideration of issues related to the connections and relationships that shaped civilizations as a result of migration, war, commerce, and the various cultural expressions of self, society, and the cosmos before 1500.

43.108 World Civilization II Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5194
Status Active

This course will introduce you to the study of world history, its relevance for living in the present, and the challenge to think critically about the emergence and subsequent development of the modern world since 1500. Participants in this course will examine experiences that transcend societal and cultural regions, focus on processes of cross-cultural interaction, and investigate patterns that influenced historical development and continue to impact societies on a global scale.

43.111 United States History to1877 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5195
Status Active

This course surveys United States history from the early settlement of North America through the Civil War and Reconstruction. It considers the role of the political and economic leadership in the building of the nation as well as actions of ordinary people whose energies and aspirations constitute the fabric of United States society.

43.112 United States History since 1877 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5196
Status Active

This course surveys the history of the United States from the end of Reconstruction to the present. It covers significant developments in the politics, economy, culture, and other aspects of American life during that period.

43.200 Early Christianity: The First Centuries Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34822
Status Active

This course serves as an introduction to the first 800 years of Christian history. It will begin with an introduction to the Apostolic Church of the first century (and its Jewish/Greco-Roman background) and conclude with an introduction to the Eastern Orthodox Church of Late Antiquity. The course will also cover popular topics like "Gnosticism," "Women in Early Christianity," and "Early Christian Worship and Art."

43.204 China & the Modern World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5201
Status Active

This course introduces China's interactions with the world since the 1840s. With theOpium War as the starting point, students are ushered into a traditional China whosepolitical system, cultural values, and an economic structure stood in sharp contrast to those of the outside world. The main focus of the course is to explore the process inwhich China fought for its survival as a sovereign nation and searched for its road tomodernization.

43.207 Women in China Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5204
Status Active

From Confucian texts to current conditions, the course examines the evolution of Chinese women's status throughout the centuries. The course will ask questions such as whether Confucianism dictated oppression against women, what factors influenced the changes of status for women, how Western feminism is connected with Chinese women, what roles women played in transforming China, and how ordinary women lived and are still living in China.

43.209 Colonial Latin America Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5206
Status Active

This class examines the history of Latin America from 1492 until the early nineteenth century. After considering the rise of the Aztec and Inca empires, we will consider how the Spanish and Portuguese were able to acquire and maintain control in the region. Topics include indigenous-European relations, slavery, economic developments, the challenges of maintaining a colonial government, and Latin American independence.

43.211 Historical Dimensions of Globalization Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33660
Status Active

This course explores the impact of globalization on the development of world societies in the late 20th-early 21st century. Using historical analysis of contemporary realities, it develops an appropriate frame of reference to address questions about the nature and cause of globalization.

43.212 Modern Latin America Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 33661
Status Active

Modern Latin America, a 200-level course, surveys Latin America from independence in the early nineteenth century to the present using primary sources, a textbook, and scholarly works. It begins with an understanding of the political, social, and economic context from which ideas of independence emerged and consideres the wars for independence. We will spend a significant part of the course studying nation-building: how did the leaders of new nations define their nations and the values that would guide them? Who was included and who was excluded in the process of nation-building? The next part of the course examines the demands of groups originally excluded: the indigenous population, women, and the poor. The portion of the course covering the twentieth century emphasizes Latin America's international connections, focusing on influence from the United States and the effectds of world wars on the region. Mass politics also emerge, and are expressed in the Mexican Revolution and in Peronism. We also wiill consider the Cuban Revolution and its wider effects in the region. We will conclude our survey of the region by considering how historical trends continue to affect politics today. For example, the Bolivian political scene continues to be affected by the events and outcome of the War of the Pacific (1879-1883) and by a strong indigenist movement.

43.213 History of the Ancient Near East Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37455
Status Active

This broad survey investigates the development of the so-called "Cradles of civilization, " Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, the Levant and Persia. At times the class will dip deeply into these cultures, using primary texts as well as archaeological and artistic evidence to better understand the political, religious, economic, military, social and artistic evolution of these closely associated cultures. We will focus on themes such as the development of kingship as a secular and sacred ruler, the ideology of Empire, the environment, and the fragility of the inter-connected network of resources that developed. The ultimate goal is to understand the inter-cultural milieu of the Ancient Near East and demonstrate how much Western civilization owes to these historical developments.

43.223 England to 1660 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35872
Status Active

A survey of English History to 1660 with emphasis on the Institutional, Economic and cultural developments. In addition to providing general knowledge of the topic, the course is designed to enhance the learning experience of both History and English majors.

43.224 England Since 1660 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35704
Status Active

A survey of English History since 1660 with emphasis on the Instutional, Economic and cultural developments. In addition to providing general knowledge of the topic, the course is designed to enhance the learning experience of both History and English majors.

43.225 Ancient Greek History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5213
Status Active

A study of Greek history, institutions and culture from Minoan times through the Hellenistic period.

43.226 Roman History and Civilization Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5214
Status Active

This course examines one thousand years of Roman history (ca. 500 BC-500AD) with equal emphasis upon social, political, military, and cultural aspects of the Republic and Empire.

43.227 Europe in the Middle Ages Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 1244
Status Active

A survey of the Latin West during the formative period from the Roman Empire to the creation and development of the first European civilization.

43.228 Women in European History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5215
Status Active

This course examines the history of women in late medieval, early modern, and modern Western Europe (ca. 1300-1900). From medieval saints and Renaissance queens to Enlightenment Salonieres and ordinary wives and mothers, women have played an astonishing variety of roles. We will utilize primary and secondary sources, historical films, and works of art to understand the contributions and challenges of women in the past.

43.231 Renaissance and Reformation Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5217
Status Active

The history of Europe in the time of transition between the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period. Two principle topics are the intensification of cultural change which began in Italy around 1300 and spread slowly northward and the disruption of the unity of the Western Christian Church.

43.237 Europe in the Twentieth Century Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5221
Status Active

This course will survey the continent�s history over its `age of extremes� in the twentieth century, moving broadly from the apogee of European global power at the turn of the century to its decline in the trauma of two world wars and decolonization, through the Cold War and post-1945 recovery and the challenges and possibilities that have arisen for Europe in the aftermath of 1989 and the fall of the Berlin Wall.

43.239 The Nonwestern World Since 1945 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5223
Status Active

The recent history of Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin America and the comparative global processes and trends that have influenced the world since 1945.

43.240 World War I Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5224
Status Active

The course will cover the wide range of causes of this major conflict, the difficulties and changing dynamics of waging this massive war and the effects of all this on both the internal political and social conditions and external consequences for the combatants with the peace settlement.

43.241 Colonial Survival: Case Studies in Early American Legal and Political History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37709
Status Active

This class contrasts the dominant monoculture colonies of Massachusetts Bay and Virginia with the lesser known multicultural colonies of Maine, Plymouth, New Amsterdam, Maryland and Rhode Island. While some of the multicultural colonies foundered, others flourished by utilizing a wide range of political and legal methods which allowed for their survival alongside much larger rival colonies. The class finishes by examining similar political and legal methods employed by Native American tribes for their own survival, in particular the Cherokee, whose carefully negotiated accommodations to Anglo-American culture allowed them to live side by side with the growing United States until the 1830's. Close analysis of both primary and secondary source material will provide students with an intensive look at rarely examined issues in early American history.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 43.111 United States History to 1877.

43.242 World War II Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5225
Status Active

The Second World War transformed states and people from East Asia to the United States to Europe. We examine diplomatic and military aspects of the war and how it affected the lives of people in the countries involved. Topics include the prelude to the war, military campaigns in Europe and the Pacific, collaboration and resistance, the home front, the Holocaust, science and the atom bomb, and the consequences of the war.

43.249 The Vietnam War Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38202
Status Active

Covers the U.S. was in Vietnam from its origins in the French colonial era to its impact on contemporary culture and foreign policy.

43.258 Russia to 1796 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5233
Status Active

The growth of the Russian state: Varangian origins, the Kievan state, conversion to Christianity, Mongol domination, the rise of Muscovy, Europeanization and expansion under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great.

43.262 The Twenties and the Thirties Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5236
Status Active

An examination of the emergence of the corporate and governmental institutions of modern America set in two turbulent decades of cultural and political ferment that involved both booming prosperity and the economic collapse of the Great Depression.

43.270 Women in American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5238
Status Active

This course surveys the history of women in the British North American colonies and United States with a special focus on social and economic change. It examines women as a distinct group but also attends to divisions among them, particularly those based on class, ethnicity/race, and regional diversity. Course themes include concepts of womanhood, the development and transgression of gender roles, unpaid work and wage labor, social reform and women's rights activism, as well as changing ideas and practices with respect to the female body.

43.274 Native American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5242
Status Active

A comprehensive study of the Native Americans through historical and first-hand accounts of their lives. Designed to enlighten students and to represent fairly the Native Americans, dispelling some of the existing myths about them.

43.275 African-American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5243
Status Active

This course surveys African American history in the United States from colonization to the present. It begins with a study of life in West Africa and traces the forced migration of Africans to the Americas. It explores West African transmissions, the freedom struggle, the great migrations from the South, the Harlem Renaissance, the modern Civil Rights movement, and the continuing impact of African Americans on life in the 21st century.

43.279 History of Lowell Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5245
Status Active

This course will provide an overview of the growth, decline, and rebirth of the city of Lowell, Massachusetts. Topics will include the Industrial Revolution, role of women and unions in the workplace, immigration and the formation of ethnic neighborhoods, urban renewal, and historic preservation. The survey will also discuss notable personalities such as labor activist Sarah Bagley, Civil War general Benjamin Butler, writer Jack Kerouac, Senator Paul Tsongas and boxer Micky Ward. The foregoing names may differ over time.

43.281 Sub--Saharan Africa Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30354
Status Active

This course provides a basic introduction to the history of the African continent. It will expose students to the processes and patterns that have shaped modern African history. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the continent faces today. But, at the same time, it will also provide students with the knowledge to shatter the myths and stereotypes about Africa.

43.295 Japan Since 1600 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5252
Status Active

A study of the traditional Japanese institutions and the transformation of Japan into a modern state after 1868: the Tokugawa Shogunate, Meiji Restoration, Russo-Japanese War, world power status, militarism, World War II, and present day Japan.

43.296 United States Diplomatic History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5253
Status Active

Although the course takes the entire United States diplomatic history as its field of historical study, its focus is on the American foreign policy in the twentieth century. The course first explores domestic and international factors that made the United States a world power by 1898. It will then consider the goals, the practices, and the results of the twentieth century American foreign policy. The course challenges students to view American diplomacy in a global context.

43.298 Introduction to Historical Methods Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5255
Status Active

An introduction for the undergraduate student to the nature and principles of history. The course takes up methodology, historiography, research methods, electronic resources, bibliography, and the technical and stylistic problems involved in the presentation of research in scholarly form. Required of all history majors in the sophomore year.

Pre/Co-Requisites: No Freshman, History Majors only.

43.301 The World of Things: Consumer Cultures in the Modern West Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5257
Status Active

This course will examine the emergence and historical impact of consumer cultures in the modern West, from the eighteenth century through the present. Topics to be covered will include the emergence of spaces of consumption (the home, the commercial/spectacular metropolis, the department store, the shopping mall, the tourist site), changing attitudes toward shopping and spending, the construction of modern social identities of class, gender, generation and race through consumption, and political struggles over consumption.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.302 Byzantine History & Civilization Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5258
Status Active

A study of the important political, social, and cultural changes in the East Roman Empire from the founding of Constantinople to the fall of the Empire in 1453 with emphasis on the role of Byzantium as the custodian of the classical past.

43.304 European Economic & Social History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5260
Status Active

Europe has been transformed in the last 250 years from an agricultural society to a post-industrial one. We study the processes by which this happened, from the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and early 19th century to the wars and depressions of the early 20th century and the collapse of the communist system and European unification in the late 20th century. Students learn basic concepts and methods of history and economics.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Level: minimum Sophomore standing.

43.308 History of Crime and Social Control Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5264
Status Active

Analyzes the causes and development of attempts to control crime, ethnic conflict, radical protest movements, urban disorders, and attitude and role conflicts.

43.310 History of New England Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5266
Status Active

Explores the evolution of New England society from pre-Columbian to the Post-Industrial, emphasizing the ways succeeding generations of New Englanders have confronted social and economic change. Topics include: white-Indian relations, ecological change, Puritanism, the New England town, the industrial revolution, the rise of cities, immigration, ethnic and class conflict, and the distinctiveness of the region.

43.314 American Social History II Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5270
Status Active

This course explores various aspects of common peoples' lives in the United States since 1880. Primary areas of investigation include work and leisure, family and community, as well as culture and values.

43.316 American Environmental History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5272
Status Active

This course explores the environmental history of early America and the United States from the end of the last ice age (c. 12,500 years ago) to the present. It examines the role played by nature as an historical agent as well as the relationship between human communities and the physical and organic environment. Course themes include evolving land use, the environmental significance of industrial capitalism, urban public health, resource conservation and wilderness protection, the impact of ecology on public consciousness, as well as environmentalism.

43.320 American East Asian Relations Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5276
Status Active

The course examines relations between the United States on one hand and Japan, Korea, China, Vietnam, and the Philippines on the other in the 19th and 20th centuries. Besides political, trade, and cultural relations, there is also emphasis on American laws and practices regarding immigrants from these East Asian countries. The aim of the course is for students to gain a basic knowledge of American relations with East Asia and to develop analytical skills for sophisticated inter-national relations.

43.321 The Holocaust Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5277
Status Active

In a world in which genocide is real, the murder of six-to-eight million Jews between 1939 and 1945 remains a critical topic of inquiry. When were factories of death first conceived? What perverse rationale motivated the collaborators who built and operated the gas chambers and crematoria? This course will answer questions of this kind by examining the most respected scholars who have written on and primary sources that speak directly to the Holocaust

43.322 Chinese Foreign Policy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5278
Status Active

Chinese foreign policy since 1949 with a strong emphasis on tracing the links between historical, ideological, and cultural influences, on the one hand, and pragmatic and nationalistic considerations on the other. While tracing these links, the course explores the intricate process of policymaking in the People's Republic of China.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Requisite: Sophomore level or higher.

43.323 World of the Atlantic Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34780
Status Active

The concept of the Atlantic world arose to describe the interactions of the peoples of the Americas, Europe, and Africa through trade, conquest, colonialism, independence and beyond. In this class, we will consider the cultural, economic, and political relationships that are formed and change over time between these groups. We will pay special attention to historical approaches to studying and writing about the Atlantic World.

43.327 England: The Middle Ages Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 1245
Status Active

The history of the English people and nation from the Roman conquest to the end of the fourteenth century with special emphasis on the development of political and social institutions.

43.329 Childhood in Premodern Europe Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 30355
Status Active

This course examines the concept of childhood in medieval and Renaissance Europe (ca. 1100-1600), with particular attention to England and Italy. There are no specific prerequisites, although some knowledge of European history (i.e., Medieval Institutions, Western Civilization, Renaissance-Reformation) will be useful. Among the topics we will consider are the following: the different stages of childhood; children's education and apprenticeship; dress, diet, and demeanor of children; orphans; royal children; Protestant and Catholic views of children; adolescent sexuality; depiction of children in art; child labor; literature for children.

43.330 Tudor and Stuart England, 1485-1714 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5283
Status Active

Traces the transformation of England from a small island kingdom to the hub of an overseas empire. During this period the English people underwent religious upheaval and civil war, saw the rise and partial decline of the monarchy, built and rebuilt London, and enjoyed the plays of Shakespeare. Although England provides the focus for this course, the rest of the Tudor and Stuart world is included.

43.332 Warfare in the Ancient World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37440
Status Active

Warfare in the Ancient World is a practical introduction to the study of warfare in the ancient world and traces the advances made in empire building, ideology and military technology. The chronological structure of the class starts with the Egyptians and continues through the Dark Age, Classical and Hellenistic Greeks, to the rise and fall of Rome. This course will trace certain themes through the centuries: how different civilizations waged war; who served in various armies and why soldiers decided to fight. While major battles and important individuals are discussed, military tactics and strategies are only tools to help understand the underlying causes for armed conflict.

43.334 The French Revolution and Napoleon Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5286
Status Active

This course will involve students directly in critical consideration of the central events and issues of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods, with an eye to their longer-term historical resonances in France, Europe and beyond. The core problems we will be discussing are ones which have remained vital in modern and even contemporary political history: the nature of liberty, the nation and national identity, equality and inequalities, violence and terror in politics, the cult of the leader, war and empire.

43.336 Problems of Modern Ireland Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5288
Status Active

This course focuses on a discussion of the problems in Modern Irish History, how they became problems and what people have tried to do to resolve them. You will also learn about the nature of both history and human beings who have made history, and you will learn how to analyze historical issues, and come to some logical and defensible conclusion about the nature of those events and people. In this course, particularly, you will learn how to analyze events in terms of the challenges of economic, political and social claims by different groups with their competing values.

43.337 Germany Since 1871 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5289
Status Active

43.338 War and Memory in Twentieth Century France Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37041
Status Active

This course will address the individual and collective trauma of modern warfare, as that was experienced in France both during and after the country's three main wars in the twentieth century. It focuses on how the experience of modern war was negotiated in culture---in personal and official memory, in gender relations, and in a great variety of written and visual texts. Individual units will be dedicated to World War I, the Occupation and Vichy Regime during World War II, and the Algerian War, and to the long and conflicted afterlife of those conflicts.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.342 Inquisition: Myth and Realtiy Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5292
Status Active

Following a brief introduction and an overview of the medieval Inquisition, the first few weeks of the course will be devoted to a study of the Inquisition in Spain and Italy from 1450-1650. We will also discuss the way in which the history of the Inquisition has been analyzed during the past five hundred years (what historians call "historiography"). The second half of the course will focus on student research and selected topics in Inquisition studies.

43.343 Fascism and the Radical Right in Twentieth Century Europe Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34573
Status Active

This course will offer a comparative exploration of the deep and enduring appeal of fascism and far rightist politics in twentieth century Europe. Beginning with the nationalist revival and cultural crisis of the late nineteenth century and the cataclysm of World War I, we will trace the rise of the radical right to political prominence in Europe in the 1920's and 1930's. While retaining a Europe-wide perspective throughout, we will analyze in particular detail the Fascist and National Socialist seizures of power in Italy and Germany, and examine their efforts of political, social, economic and cultural mobilization. Issues covered will include fascist political communication and governance, terror and "normality" in everyday life, labor and youth policy, racism and racial purification, and gender and reproductive politics, among others. In the final section of the course, we will contemplate the historical legacy of fascism after 1945, focusing on the politics of memory and representation in post-war Germany, Italy and Europe more generally, and assessing the recent resurgence of fascist and quasi-fascist political tendencies in the 1980's and 1990's.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.344 Revolutions in the Modern World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38334
Status Active

In this comparative history course, we look at the theories of Marx, Barrington Moore, Crane Brinton, Theda Skocpol, William Sewell, and others on the causes, dynamics, and outcomes of revolutions in the modern world. We then consider the history of the French, Russian, Vietnamese, and Iranian Revolutions (list may vary each semester) to see how well the theories fit the events. The course ends with a discussion of whether the pattern and analyses discussed in the course are helpful in understanding a contemporary revolution, such as that in Egypt.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 43.106 The Modern World.

43.345 Slavery and Abolition Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5293
Status Active

This course takes a comparative approach to the study of plantation slavery in the Americas with special attention to developments in Virginia and Cuba. It surveys the structure of slavery in the nineteenth century United States South; slavery's legacy in the United States; and its twenty-first century reincarnation in human trafficking and forced labor around the world.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Requisite: Sophomore level or higher.

43.348 Making an Historical Documentary Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34782
Status Active

This course provides students with the basic conceptual and technical skills for developing and completing an historical documentary, including instruction about subject choice, narrative structure, camera work, and editing.

43.349 The Cuban Revolution Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34715
Status Active

The Cuban Revolution has been surrounded by controversy since it took power in 1959. Through readings, films, and discussions, we will examine not only the events that have occurred in Cuba over the last four decades but also the ways that they have been presened to audiences in Cuba, the United States, and elsewhere. We will carefully consider the role of perspective in academic writing and the media and how it has shaped understandings of the Castro era.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.350 Colonial America: History and Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5295
Status Active

Emphasis is on the British North American and Caribbean colonies of the 17th and early 18th centuries. Topics include: the impact of European pandemic diseases on the native American populations, new European technologies and the transformation of the environment: contrasts between religious, social, and economic developments in New England and those in the settlements to the south; a comparative analysis of slavery; and the beginnings of modernism.

43.351 Colonial Society and the Captivity Narrative Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37722
Status Active

The long sequence of military conflicts in New England at the turn of the eighteenth century led to an equally long sequence of accounts describing the experiences of English colonists taken captive by French of Native American military forces. While these narratives are often portrayed as a uniquely American literary genre, this course will open by exploring the wider European tradition of captivity narratives from the medieval and early modern periods. Readings for the course will consist of narratives written by Britians taken captive by Barbary pirates, the traditional New England captivity narratives as well as the "anti-captivity" narratives written by colonists who chose to remain with their Native American captors, all of which will be examined against the backdrop of cultural changes on both sides of the Atlantic ocean.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 43.111 United States History to 1877.

43.352 The Coming of the American Revolution Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5296
Status Active

A study of 18th-century British America with emphasis on the paradoxes of unity and diversity, Anglophilia and Anglophobia, slavery and freedom, and enlightenment rationalism and evangelical religion. The course also deals with the major causes, events, and interpretations relating to the coming of the American Revolution. Offered on a rotating basis.

43.353 The French and Indian and Revolutionary Wars Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5297
Status Active

The years between 1754 and 1784 saw drastic change on the North American continent and around the world for Britain and its colonies. Colonists in North America went from being devout British subjects during the French and Indian War to rebelling and founding their own new country during the American Revolution. In turn, the British Empire went from spending millions of pounds on North America in the 1750's to barely committing the resources necessary for fighting the Revolution. This class examines these cultural and political transitions in context with discussions on the varied populations of North America who experienced them.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 43.111 United States History to 1877.

43.355 Jacksonian America Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5299
Status Active

An investigation of the social, political, and economic developments in the United States from 1815 to 1848. Special emphasis is placed on the spread of capitalism, the growth of reform movements, the development of cities, and the conflict over slavery.

43.356 Civil War and Reconstruction Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5300
Status Active

This course surveys the increasing political, social, and economic tensions between the North and the South during the first half of the nineteenth century; the explosion of those tensions into secession and conflict; the four years of war; and the postwar struggle to reconstruct the South and forge a new union.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Requisite: Sophomore level or higher.

43.357 American Civil War in Memory Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5301
Status Active

Students analyze how Americans have remembered the American Civil War in the years after the war ended in 1865. By looking at novels, memoir films, National Park Service Battlefields, and monuments, students discover how remembrances are influenced by views of race, gender, patriotism, regionalism, and economic forces.

43.358 Amazing American Lives Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5302
Status Active

Biography often has been used by historians as source material for representing the nature of the American experience. An examination of outstanding biographies of the lives of various Americans can yield insights into all levels and ranks of American society from colonial days to the late twentieth century.

43.359 Early United States Political Culture Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5303
Status Active

The course examines what is often referred to as the Golden Age of American Democracy. How much power did ordinary Americans have in the political system? What motivated people to participate in politics? What roles did women and racial minorities play in American politics despite not being able to vote?

43.362 The Twenties and the Thirties Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5306
Status Active

An examination of the emergence of the corporate and governmental institutions of modern America set in two turbulent decades of cultural and political ferment that involved both booming prosperity and the economic collapse of the Great Depression.

43.365 United States History since 1960 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5309
Status Active

Discusses Cold War politics and civil rights upheavals during the 1960's and 1970's, the decline of American economic and political power, and the resurgence of conservative politics in the 1980's.

43.369 Russia 1796 to the Present Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38594
Status Active

This course covers the history of Russia in its various incarnations-Imperial Russia from the end of Catherine the Great's reign the Soviet Union, and today's Russian Federation. We use both historical works and literature to get a better understanding of the Imperial state, the nature and the social bases of autocracy, the ideologies and actions of the movements that supported the Empire and those that opposed it. We cover the cataclysms of World War I, the Revolutions, Civil War, and the Soviet period (preparing the student for the course on "Stalin's Russia", 43.374). We examine the causes and events involved int he decline and collapse of the Soviet Union, and the rise and emerging patterns of behavior of the Russian Federation.

43.369 Russia in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5313
Status Active

Addresses selected topics in modern Russian history: political and social reforms of the nineteenth century, international policies in Europe and Asia, the 1917 revolutions, development of the new regime under Lenin, Stalinist policies, World War II, and Russian expansion. A comparative study of these topics will underscore patterns of continuity in both Tsarist and Communist Russia.

43.373 Nazi Germany Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5317
Status Active

This course looks at the period 1933-1945 (the period of the "Third Reich") in Germany from the perspectives of economics, politics, society, and the arts. In the course, we will read preeminent historians who have written on each of these themes in order to gain a firm understanding of the historical debates that surround the period. Specific subjects include the Nazi consolidation of power, the increasingly brutal nature of anti-Semitic policies, the power struggles among chief Nazi officials, the ideologies and personae of figures like Hitler, Rosenberg, and Goebbels, the nature of "Nazi art" and cultural policies, and the path to war.

43.374 Stalin's Russia Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5318
Status Active

Spanning the period from the "October Revolution" of 1917 to Stalin's death in 1953, this course considers "Stalinist Russia" from the perspectives of economics, society, the arts, politics and war. In the course, we will read the preeminent historians who have written on these topics.

43.376 20th Century Irish History in Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38595
Status Active

This course is on the representation of Irish history in narrative feature and documentary films made in or about Ireland. Starting with the revolutionary era, it covers the key events, issues, and debates that defined Irish politics, culture and society in the last hundred years. The course is divided into five thematic sections and proceeds chronologically through the 20th century, starting with the War of Independence against the Britain and the Civil War that followed; the American romanticism of Ireland in film;social issues that plagued the Irish Free State and Republic;the period of violence in the North known as The Troubles;and the issued raised by multi-culturalism during the Celtic Tiger era.

43.379 United States Industry Twentieth Century Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5322
Status Active

An exploration of the rapid growth of the American economy in the 20th century, including the evolution of the large corporation and the mass production assembly line. Particular attention is devoted to the ways in which immigrants, women, and the African Americans were affected by the rise of big business. The course also traces the decline of the traditional U.S. manufacturing base following the Second World War and the impact this had on the working class and their unions.

43.380 Work and Society Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5323
Status Active

Provides a survey of labor history from the colonial period to the present focusing on the interrelationship between culture and work in American society and on the dynamics of technical and economic changes on the organization of work processes.

43.381 United States in the 1960s Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5324
Status Active

This course examines the United States during the 1960s. General themes include the stifling and freeing of dissent, the �rights revolution,� liberal social and economic policy, foreign policy in a bipolar world, redefinition of values and morals, changing relations between women and men, increasing concern with environmental pollution, the growing credibility gap between citizens and their government, and rise of the �New Right�.

43.382 The American West Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5325
Status Active

Involves readings and discussions of the history of the American frontier and the place of the frontier in American society and thought.

43.384 Radicalism in American History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5327
Status Active

A biographical approach to the influence of radicalism on American history with emphasis on significant and representative personalities and heir contributions.

43.386 History of College, 1100-1900 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35078
Status Active

The foundation of universities in late medieval Europe also ushered in the earliest colleges, intended primarily to house students but also to provide tutoring, social support, and financial assistance. The earliest colleges arose in Paris but soon spread to Bologna, Oxford, and other university towns. This course traces the history of colleges from late medieval Europe to nineteenth-century America. It considers the various models of colleges that developed in northern and southern Europe, and how those models were transferred across the Atlantic. Some colleges remained primarily residences, while others expanded to ofer a full graduate and undergraduate curriculum. We will also consider topics like student life, financial arrangements, admissions, alumni, and academic requirements.

43.389 Ancient History in Film Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37439
Status Active

Ancient History in Film seeks understand the interconnection between ancient texts, social history and pop culture in American cinema. This course is more than an excuse to watch fun films and gain academic credit. It will engage the primary texts that are the foundation for these cinematic creations while investigating the social and cultural influences that shaped the making of these movies. Ultimately, this course will provide a clearer view of our own world through the lens of moviemakers mimicking the Greco-Roman world. We will read primary texts in translation, modern analyses of these movies and you are responsible to watch an entire film between class sessions. All films are on reserve in the Media Center of the O'Leary Library.

43.390 Topics in History Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35708
Status Active

An advanced course of study and examination of a variety of issues and topics in history. Students without a sufficient background in history courses should not attempt this course. Subject matter to be announced in advance.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.105 West Civ to 1715, or 43.106 The Modern World, or 43.111 The US to 1877, or 43.112 The US sinc 1877, or Permission.

43.391 America and the World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35559
Status Active

In an age of increasing globalization, historians realize the need for putting the American national narrative in a wider historical context. This course will help students locate the study of the United States in a global, comparative and transnational perspective. This course will be used as one of the courses needed by History majors in the global, comparative and under-represented areas of the major.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.112 U.S. History Since 1877.

43.393 History of the Middle East and Islamic World Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5331
Status Active

This course examines the history of the Middle East and the Islamic World from the time of Muhammad to the present. It provides an introduction to the history of this often turbulent region. It exposes students to the processes and patterns that have shaped the history of the Islamic World. The course examines the historical roots of the many challenges that the region faces today.

43.401 History Writing and Community Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 34894
Status Active

Restricted to upper-level students and available only with permission of the instructor, this course offers a select number of students the opportunity to work for non-profit and governmental organizations within Lowell. Such organizations might include the National Park Service; Community Teamwork Inc.; Girls Club of Lowell; St. Athanasius Church; American Textile History Museum, and so forth. The course is primarily intended for History majors. Students will utilize their skills in research, writing, and analysis to assist an organization with its documented needs (e.g., conduct research on history of the organization; write a pamphlet or short article; organize oral history interviews; analyze the urban context in which the organization has developed). Students receive academic credit, along with invaluable work-related experience.

43.410 Olympic Games and World's Fairs Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 37042
Status Active

The course studies Olympic Games and World's Fairs from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. We examine how these international festivals participate in and contribute to six themes in the history of that period: nationalism and internationalism, mechanization of industry, modern architecture and urban planning, consumer culture, racial politics, and the Cold War. Students write brief papers connection these themes and one or more game or fair and a research paper on a relevant topic. Special attention is given to certain icons, like the Crystal Palace, the Eiffel Tower, the Nazi Olympics, and the Mexico City games.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.106 The Modern World or the permission of the instructor.

43.421 The Age of European Global Expansion, 1400-1850 Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38593
Status Active

This course examines the history of European global expansion from 1400-1850. The course begins with the medieval roots of European expansion. We then focus our attention on the expansion of the seaborne empires of Portugal and Spain beginning in the fifteenth century and those of their later challengers- the Dutch, the French, and the British. This course emphasizes how European efforts at empire building in the early modern period were often limited, a process shaped by capacities of the many diverse local populations that Europeans encountered. In addition, European expansion aided in the processes of global integration as it promoted the exchanges of goods,people,germs,plants, diets, ideas, and cultures.

43.432 Research Seminar Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5337
Status Active

Systematic research in primary and secondary sources culminating in the writing of an original research paper using proper methodological and stylistic techniques. Weekly meetings and written and oral progress reports. Students must be acquainted with word-processing techniques. Required of all History majors.

43.443 'Foreigners' of the Middle East Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 38524
Status Active

This class focuses on how societies organize difference, looking at the relationships between national, ethnic, religious, racial, gender and /or socio-economic affiliations in creating and concretizing foreignness and minorities in the Arab Middle East and today's Turkey and Iran during the late Ottoman and colonial eras. This class includes engagement with historical sources, movies, memoirs and more, and requires several short papers and one longer term paper and presentation.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-req: 43.106 The Modern World.

43.491 Directed Study Credits: 1-4

Course Details
Min Credits 1
Max Credits 4
Course ID 5339
Status Active

Directed study offers the student the opportunity to engage in an independent study or research project under the supervision of a department member. Working closely with the instructor, students define and investigate a research topic in an area of special interest and present the results of their investigation in a significant paper. Juniors and seniors only.

43.496 Practicum Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 5343
Status Active

A program of on-campus and off-campus experiences for history majors only. Specific requirements vary depending upon the nature of the program undertaken by the student. The intent of the practicum experience is to provide an occasion for investigation of a community, social, cultural, or artistic area and for applying techniques of problem solving and/or skills that are appropriate to the student's major discipline. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Students are graded 'satisfactory' or 'unsatisfactory.' The practicum experience may not be substituted for a required course in the major.

43.497 Tsongas Center Field Practice Credits: 3

Course Details
Min Credits 3
Max Credits 3
Course ID 35077
Status Active

This 3-credit hour course will be an addition to the History Department's other 400-level courses. Currently, students enrolled in the "Research Seminar" conduct primary original research and present that research in one or another format. Those in the "Directed Study" work with assigned faculty on the historiographic breadth of a particular topic, reading selected books, writing response papers, and meeting for weekly discussions. Additionally, the existing "Practicum" allows students to earn course credit for hands-on classroom and history museum projects. The "Tsongas Center Practicum" will combine elements of all three, and make it possible to identify the specific Tsongas Center focus as such on student transcripts.

Pre/Co-Requisites: Pre-Req: 43.298 Intro to Historical Methods.