Manning School of Business

Bachelor's Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

The Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree provides students with a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences, as well as analytical skills and specialized professional courses, which enable them to function as effective professional managers. Course work in the first two years focuses on the liberal arts, mathematics, sciences and introductory professional skills courses. These subjects provide the foundation on which the advanced courses are built. Liberal arts and sciences courses emphasize written English, behavioral and social sciences, and mathematics. Professional skills courses include accounting, economics, and statistics.

As juniors and seniors, students concentrate in professional programs offered by the Manning School of Business. The School curriculum offers concentrations in five areas of management: Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Management Information Systems (MIS). The upper-level curriculum starts with introductory management courses covering the functional areas found in organizations. Through the junior and senior years students will complete a course of study in at least one concentration. Given the increasing importance of global competition and its impact on both public and private sectors in the U.S., the School also includes an international component in all curricula. Regardless of concentration, students have sufficient electives to permit them to tailor programs to their special interests.

Note - The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Management program was closed for new admissions in 2002.

Curriculum Checksheets

The main link below shows university requirements for a BS in business administration. The secondary links show specific requirements for concentrations within the major. Following are downloadable degree plans for students entering the Manning School of Business in or after Fall 2005 (checksheets are in PDF format, Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for viewing):